CaNews Archive‎ > ‎

September 2019

Contents

  1. 1 September 30, 2019
    1. 1.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 1.2 September 29, 2019
      1. 1.2.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.2.2 EDITORIAL: Climate threat is a ‘crisis’ - The Guardian lead editorial
    3. 1.3 September 28, 2019
      1. 1.3.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    4. 1.4 September 27, 2019
      1. 1.4.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    5. 1.5 September 26, 2019
      1. 1.5.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.5.2 Dorian response bruises premier - The Eastern Graphic article by publisher Paul MacNeill
      3. 1.5.3 P.E.I. standing committee meeting on Dorian postponed - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
    6. 1.6 September 25, 2019
      1. 1.6.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    7. 1.7 September 24, 2019
      1. 1.7.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    8. 1.8 September 23, 2019
      1. 1.8.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.8.2 The Great Green Wall Is the Type of Utopian Project That Could Save the Planet - Global Citizen article by Joe McCarthy, Erica Sanches and Pia Gralki
    9. 1.9 September 22, 2019
      1. 1.9.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    10. 1.10 September 21, 2019
      1. 1.10.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.10.2 Daniel Pauly’s Three Big Moves to Save the World’s Threatened Fisheries - The Tyee article by Andrew Nikiforuk
    11. 1.11 September 20, 2019
      1. 1.11.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.11.2 Nova Scotia had secret pact with Northern Pulp to share environmental assessment costs  - The Chronicle-Herald article by Aaron Beswick
      3. 1.11.3 Let’s all support the global climate strikes! - David Suzuki Foundtion article by David Suzuki with contributions from senior writer Ian Hanington
    12. 1.12 September 19, 2019
      1. 1.12.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.12.2 Naomi Klein: 'We Are Seeing the Beginnings of the Era of Climate Barbarism' - The Guardian (UK) article by Natalie Hanman
    13. 1.13 September 18, 2019
      1. 1.13.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.13.2 How to Support the Global Climate Strike - Lifehacket article by Josh Ocampo
      3. 1.13.3 LACK OF KNOWLEDGE IS NOT THE ISSUE - The Guardian Letter to the Editor
    14. 1.14 September 17, 2019
      1. 1.14.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    15. 1.15 September 16, 2019
      1. 1.15.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    16. 1.16 September 15, 2019
      1. 1.16.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 1.16.2 Spin before shovels in the ground - The Eastern Graphic article by publisher Paul MacNeill
    17. 1.17 September 14, 2019
      1. 1.17.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    18. 1.18 September 13, 2019
      1. 1.18.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    19. 1.19 Premier Dennis King is slated to be on CBC Radio's Island Morning (not sure of the time), and the Political Panel is also set to discuss events,  at 7:40AM. Events: Today and next Friday: Fridays for Future, 3:30-4:30PM, Cenotaph by Province House. Please note that on September 27th, the event will be from Noon-2PM.  
    20. 1.20 Climate Emergency signs for sale:
    21. 1.21 Their effectiveness will be determined by the number of them that appear before, during and after the election. We urge people to pass on the word to anyone who might be interested in buying a sign.     
    22. 1.22 Here they come, three of Canada's most brilliant elders: David Suzuki, Stephen Lewis and Buffy Ste. Marie on the Climate First Tour. At this point there is NO stop in P.E.I., and only four on this Tour now (Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal, Halifax).  Also, it does not appear as if Buffy is confirmed for Halifax.  :-/ Halifax is Tuesday, September 24th, at the Rebecca Cohn Auditorium at the Dalhousie Arts Centre. Tickets are $14 for students and $26 for adults.  Anyone interested in ride-sharing to Halifax? More details and tickets: https://www.climatefirsttour.ca/halifax Here is article from CBC Radio's "As It Happens" last night:  
  2. 2 David Suzuki joins Stephen Lewis, Buffy Sainte-Marie for 'Climate First' tour  
    1. 2.1 'This is an issue as if we are at war,' the environmental activist says is his message to young voters from: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-thursday-edition-1.5281084/david-suzuki-joins-stephen-lewis-buffy-sainte-marie-for-climate-first-tour-1.5281085  
    2. 2.2 Election recap -- What'd I Miss?
  3. 3 Election 2019 cheat sheet: the last four years in Canadian politics  
    1. 3.1 Trudeau vs. Trump: every twitch and grunt
    2. 3.2 A wave of Tory blue across Canada
    3. 3.3 The Trans Mountain pipeline saga
    4. 3.4 An attempt at reconciliation
    5. 3.5 The Liberal environmental plan
    6. 3.6 Jagmeet Singh becomes NDP leader
    7. 3.7 Trudeau’s private island vacation
    8. 3.8 A trip to India creates controversy
    9. 3.9 Canada's new federal People’s Party
    10. 3.10 Scheer struggles to denounce racism
    11. 3.11 The SNC-Lavalin affair explodes
    12. 3.12 "Live the life of the full mind, exhilarated by the new ideas, intoxicated by the Romance of the unusual,"         --- Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)
    13. 3.13 September 12, 2019
      1. 3.13.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    14. 3.14 Events: Until Saturday, September 14th: Stories in Stitches IV, 10AM-5PM (until 7PM on Friday), St. Paul's Church and Hall, Church Street and Prince Street, $5 admission. "Eastern Canada’s most dramatic exhibition of quilts, hooked rug and needlecraft creations — hundreds of them, plus artisan demonstrations.... At beautiful St. Paul’s church and hall, corner of Grafton and Prince Streets, Charlottetown … Look for the car parked on the lawn — covered in a tailor-made quilt!" Facebook event link Thursday Afternoon Farm Centre Pop-up Market, 3-6PM, front lawn of Farm Centre, 420 University Avenue. Farmers, artisans, and food producers have quite an assortment of foods and related products for sale. Darcie Lanthier MP Charlottetown Launch, 6-8PM, Farm Centre, free and all welcome.  Speeches by GPPEI Leader Peter Bevan Baker and Darcie Lanthier will top off an evening of music, munchies, refreshments and commitment auction....Music will be provided by Rowan Gallant and Jesse Périard, vegetarian delights provided by My Plum, My Duck, and there will be a variety of 'saved from the hurricane' tomato products for sale by our good friends at Heart Beet Organics." And Darcie's last name is pronounced "LAUNCH-chay", not just tonight at her Launch.... Facebook event link Later, many are planning on watching the first Federal Party Leaders' Debate at Bar1911 about 9PM. P.E.I.'s Groove Company at Baba's lounge, 8-10:30PM. Facebook event details Some upcoming events: Saturday, September 14th: Charlottetown NDP federal Candidate Nomination Meeting, 6:30-8PM, Murphy's Community Centre.  All welcome. Facebook event link Sunday, September 15th: More than something for everyone:   Open Farm Day, 1-5PM, various locations.  Visit Island Farms with a wide range of types of operations. Open Farm Day website Fourth Annual Festival of Forests, 1-4PM, Macphail Wods Ecological Centre, Orwell. "Our Fourth Annual Festival of Forests will be a family-friendly event, with children’s activities, guided walks, food and micro-workshops. This will be a great opportunity to explore the wonders of the Acadian Forest." Facebook event link Screening of PUSH -- The Film, 2-4PM, City Cinema.  "PUSH-- The Film is a documentary exploring why it has become so expensive to live in our cities, from award-winning documentary filmmaker Fredrik Gertten." Facebook event link Friday, September 20th: Climate Strike Activities this week, to be announced later Sunday, September 22nd: Dr. John Todd, 7PM, Duffy Hall, UPEI, hosted by The Institute for Bioregional Studies Ltd. and UPEI Environmental Studies. A..."... stimulating book launch that is sure to arouse discussion and a vision of hope on how PEI can become a sustainable region. John Todd is a biologist working in the field of ecological design. He addresses problems of food production and wastewater processing by using ecosystems technologies that incorporate plants, animals and bacteria. He combines alternative technologies for renewable energy, organic farming, aquaculture, hydroponics and architecture to create 'living machines' or 'eco-machines'; designed for sustainable living." <snip> More info: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFXMH5ZbNK8
    15. 3.15 Opinion piece:
  4. 4 RUSSELL WANGERSKY: Now you see it, now you don’t
    1. 4.1 "All our dreams can come true -- if we have the courage to pursue them."   --- Walter Elias (Walt) Disney (1901-1966)
    2. 4.2 September 11, 2019
      1. 4.2.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    3. 4.3 Events:This morning:
  5. 5 Public Accounts Standing Committee, 9AM-12noon,
    1. 5.1 CHANGE OF VENUE: Due to technical difficulties following the recent power outage, this meeting will take place in the Committee Room on the first floor of the J Angus MacLean Building. Live streaming will not be available but audio and transcript will be posted to our website following the meeting. We apologize for any inconvenience.The committee will meet to review The Report of the Auditor General to the Legislative Assembly dated March 8, 2019; when that review is complete, the committee will review the Report of the Auditor General: Petroleum Product Pricing: Prince Edward Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission dated December 21, 2018.Auditor General B. Jane MacAdam will be in attendance."This committee meets weekly.
  6. 6 Charlottetown Farmers' Market, 9AM-2PM, Belvedere Avenue.  Fresh produce, crafts, prepared foods, hot tea and coffee.An item of note from Marion White:  Market baskets from Bolgatanga, Ghana for sale at Charlottetown Farmer's Market starting at $40. These are beautiful and functional.11AM:  Announcement of Writ being dropped to start the Federal Election Campaign.  Election Day is legislated to be Monday, October 21st.Corn Boil hosted by Charlottetown MP Sean Casey, 5-7PM, Hillsborough Community Centre, 199 Patterson Drive.
    1. 6.1 "Join MP Sean Casey for a free corn boil!There will be lots of delicious corn, entertainment, and ADL ice cream. This is a family-friendly event! All are welcome."
  7. 7 Stand Against Hate (counter-demonstration to the rally organized by the "National Citizens Alliance of Canada"), 7PM, Kings Square.
  8. 8 Tomorrow, Thursday, September 12th:
  9. 9 Campaign Launch with Darcie Lanthier, Green Party of Canada Charlottetown Candidate, 6-8PM, Farm Centre and Legacy Garden, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.
    1. 9.1 "Join Darcie Lanthier, Green Party Candidate for Charlottetown, and her supporters in celebration of the official launch of her campaign... for an evening of music, munchies, refreshments and commitment auction....This event is free and for all ages." 
  10. 10 Article: 
  11. 11 Greta Thunberg on Climate: “If We Can Save the Banks, We Can Save the World”
  12. 12 by Jake Johnson, Common Dreamspublished on Tuesday, September 11th, 2019 at:https://truthout.org/articles/greta-thunberg-on-climate-if-we-can-save-the-banks-we-can-save-the-world/
  13. 13 During an event in New York City Monday night with author and environmentalist Naomi Klein, 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg had a simple message for those who claim it is “too expensive” to boldly confront the climate crisis with sweeping policies like a Green New Deal.
  14. 14 “If we can save the banks,” said Thunberg, “we can save the world.” “If there is something we are not lacking in this world, it’s money,” she added. “Of course, many people do lack money, but governments and these people in power, they do not lack money. And also we need to have the polluters… actually pay for the damage they have caused. So, to that argument, I would not even respond to that argument, because it has been said so many times, the money is there. What we lack now is political will and social will to do it.”
  15. 15 Thunberg arrived in New York late last month after nearly two weeks of sailing across the Atlantic. The young environmentalist made the journey ahead of the Sept. 20 global climate strikes, which she helped inspire through persistent activism that has included directly confronting world leaders and elites over their role in the planetary emergency.
  16. 16 The strikes, which are expected to bring millions to the streets in over 150 countries, will coincide with the United Nations Summit on Climate Change on Sept. 23rd in New York.
  17. 17 “I want September 20 to be a tipping point,” Thunberg said Monday night. “I want world leaders to feel like they have too many people watching them.”
  18. 18 -30-
  19. 19 "If you wish to heal your sadness or anger, seek to heal the sadness or anger of others."        ---Ana Castillo (b. 1953), Chicana poet and essayist
    1. 19.1 September 10, 2019
      1. 19.1.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 19.2 Events today:
    3. 19.3 From Tony Reddin of Bonshaw, community organizer and environmental activist:"Hope everybody's ok after the storm here in the Maritimes! Today's my birthday so I'm going to celebrate by going for a hike after lunch here in the beautiful Bonshaw Hills- who'd like to join me?"Happy Birthday, Tony! 
    4. 19.4 Education and Economic Growth Standing Committee Meeting,1:30-3:30PM, J. Angus MacLean Building, corner of Great George and Richmond Streets.
    5. 19.5 from the notice for the meeting:
    6. 19.6 CHANGE OF VENUE: Due to technical difficulties following the recent power outage, this meeting will take place in the Committee Room on the first floor of the J Angus MacLean Building. Live streaming will not be available but audio and transcript will be posted to our website following the meeting. We apologize for any inconvenience.The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the impact of the low housing vacancy rate and short-term rentals on post-secondary students, by Emma Drake, President, and Sweta Daboo, VP Academic and External, UPEI Student Union. Other witnesses to be confirmed.District 17 MLA (Peter Bevan-Baker) Corn Boil, 5-7PM, Riverdale Cider, 582 Riverdale Road (right turn from TCH across from entrance to Strathgartney Provincial Park, Riverdale
    7. 19.7 "Join your MLA for District 17 for a free family corn boil. There will be apple themed snacks, corn, music and fun!" 
    8. 19.8 Notice: Youth Circle (ages 18-30) to discuss housing and climate change, being formed
    9. 19.9 CPAC (Canadian Public Affairs Channel/Parliamentary Channel) will be producing a report on PEI once the federal election is called sometime in the next 2 weeks. As part of the report, they would like to include a Youth Circle of 3-4 youths age 18-30 discussing the issues of affordable housing and climate change. If you are interested in participating, please contact Bill Kendrick (billkendrick@island-images.ca) or 902-439-2711 for more information.
  20. 20 Robert Mitchell steps down as interim Liberal leader, considers options
    1. 20.1 -30-
    2. 20.2 Independent Child and Youth Advocate Office Public Consultations
    3. 20.3 "There is no shame in not knowing. The shame lies in not finding out."         ---Assyrian proverb
    4. 20.4 September 9, 2019
      1. 20.4.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    5. 20.5 September 8, 2019
      1. 20.5.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    6. 20.6 September 7, 2019
      1. 20.6.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    7. 20.7 Events:Farmers' Markets, all but Cardigan, which being in King's County, is being more affected by Hurricane Dorian.
    8. 20.8 Charlottetown -- 9AM-2PMSummerside -- 9AM-1PMMurray Harbour Farmers Market, 9AM-noonGeorge's in Bedeque -- 10AM-2PM
    9. 20.9 -----------------Other events will be updated as to what's going ahead or being postponed when organizers make decisions.  
  21. 21 Why social media can play a positive role in environmental action
    1. 21.1 by Taylor Loganpublished on CBC On-Line "What on Earth/" series, September 7th, 2019
    2. 21.2 Citizens' Alliance of P.E.I. Facebook page (group)
    3. 21.3 "Tension is who you think you should be.  Relaxation is who you are."    --- Chinese proverb
    4. 21.4 September 6, 2019
      1. 21.4.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    5. 21.5 Events today:Standing Committee meeting:Standing Committee on Rules, Regulations, Private Bills and Privileges, 10AM, Coles Building.This Committee is "charged with the rules and standing orders of the Legislative Assembly, scrutiny of regulations, private bills, and the privileges of individual members and the Legislative Assembly as a whole."  Chair is Official Opposition MLA Hannah Bell, and members are Official Opposition Lynne Lund, Third Party members Sonny Gallant and Gordie McNeilly, and Government members Matt MacKay and Sidney MacEwen.  The topic for today's meeting is "to consider its priorities and communications plan." People can attend in person or watch on-line here.
    6. 21.6 Dogs and Democracy, 11AM-12:30PM, UPEI Campus, W.A. Murphy Centre, free and all welcome. Sponsored by the UPEI Student Union (UPEISU). "Dogs and democracy are our 2 favourite things here at the UPEISU and we're combining them for a fun event...Come pet some therapy dogs...and vote for your favourite dog breed in a vote simulation...The ballot box will be very similar to that used by Elections Canada for Federal Elections, so come get acquainted with it before the election in October."Regarding events this weekend, some have already been rescheduled and others will likely be, so please check before starting out. e.g., District 17 MLA and Official Opposition Leader Peter Bevan-Baker's Corn Boil is now on Tuesday, September 10th, 5-7PM.  Malpeque Green Candidate Anna Keenan is moving her Piatta fundraiser to later in the week.Sunday, September 8th:PUSH! -  the Film, 2PM, City Cinema. "PUSH - The Film is a documentary exploring why it has become so expensive to live in our cities, from award-winning documentary filmmaker Fredrik Gertten.
    7. 21.7 Notes:
  22. 22 National Citizens Alliance to hold rally in Charlottetown, P.E.I.
    1. 22.1 by Dave Stewartpublished on Thursday, September 5th, 2019, in The Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/national-citizens-alliance-to-hold-rally-in-charlottetown-pei-348854/Police will be keeping an eye on Kings Square Sept. 11
    2. 22.2 "You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."      --- Cormac McCarthy (b. 1933)
    3. 22.3 September 5, 2019
      1. 22.3.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 22.3.2 Shadow Government?  - The Graphic publications Opinion Piece by Vision PEI
    4. 22.4 September 4, 2019
      1. 22.4.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 22.4.2 ATLANTIC SKIES: Finding the North Star - The Guardian column by Glenn K. Roberts
    5. 22.5 September 3, 2019
      1. 22.5.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 22.5.2 The line has been drawn - Island Farmer article by Andy Walker
    6. 22.6 September 2, 2019
      1. 22.6.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    7. 22.7 September 1, 2019
      1. 22.7.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
      2. 22.7.2 East of Toronto, a land dispute tests Trudeau's commitment to sustainability - The National Observer article by Alistair Sharp
      3. 22.7.3 Catherine McKenna says she has done everything she could to fight climate change - The National Observer article by Fatima Syed an Alistair Sharp

September 30, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Coffee with Karla -- District 12 (Charlottetown-Victoria Park) MLA Karla Bernard, 10AM-12noon, Kettle Black on lower Queen Street.
-------------------
A reminder to all, especially those in government, that the Environmental Impact Assessment is a substantial part of any project process and actually can recommend a project not go ahead, even if government wants something very badly and even if it seems like a good idea for most.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-wind-eastern-kings-myers-1.5300222

It is not 1984, and it's not 2012, when a Transportation Minister made similar comments about a certain Highway Plan B project going ahead heedless of the the Environmental Impact Assessment process. But, Government ministers and all MLAs may want to read or reread George Orwell's Animal Farm, too.
------------------------
Perhaps keep some plain old common sense in mind with the first part of the quote...
"My country is the world, and my religions is to do good." --- Thomas Paine

September 29, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Downtown Charlottetown Market, 11AM-4PM, Lower Queen Street. This is the last week of this Market, as next Sunday will be Farm Day in the City.

SHE IS project launch, Outside Receiver Coffee on Victoria Row and walking to Peakes Quay, 11AM.


insert from one of the SHE IS exhibit pieces, copied from the Facebook event link
-----
Artists Patricia Bourque and Maria Campbell will discuss their collaborative street art project "that aims to bring honour and dignity to the Mi’kmaq people of PEI and to further awareness of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls."
Facebook event link

Development and Peace (D&P)--Caritas Canada Annual Fall Action/Education Workshop, 2PM, MacKenzie Room, St. Pius X Church, Parkdale.
Guest Speaker Luke Stocking will be speaking on For Our Common Home, focusing on the Amazon and defenders of the Amazon. All welcome.

Bonshaw Ceilidh, 7-9PM, Bonshaw Hall, TCH at Green Road, admission by donation with proceeds this month going to Diabetes Canada for programs in our region. List of performers at the
Facebook event link
---------------------------------

EDITORIAL: Climate threat is a ‘crisis’ - The Guardian lead editorial

Published on Saturday, September 28th, 2019

https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/regional-perspectives/editorial-climate-threat-is-a-crisis-357725/

You might notice a difference today in our stories about the global warming protests.

From now on, we at SaltWire will refer to what’s happening to our climate as a climate crisis, instead of the usual “climate change.”

It represents a change in tone that we feel is appropriate to the urgency of the matter.

We’ve been chewing on this for some months now, since the group Extinction Rebellion besieged our office in Halifax and were invited in for a chat.

They asked us to consider this change in language, as they’re convinced people aren’t alarmed enough about the issue to insist that governments do something. Referring to it consistently as a crisis or emergency, they said, could eventually help people change how they feel about it. It could make a difference.

We’re not the first news organization to make this move. The British newspaper The Guardian has made a similar change and others have followed suit. More are considering it.

We will still publish contrary voices and commentaries on all sides of this issue.

But the vast majority of scientists are convinced that we are now very close to a point of no return, that something drastic has to happen, right now, to prevent catastrophic emergencies that will imperil millions, if not billions, of humans.

Yet another report was delivered to the United Nations this week, by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, warning of the dire consequences of continuing on our current path.

Among their findings are that global warming has reached one degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels, which is already triggering glacier melts and permafrost declines, raising sea levels, warming oceans and causing more frequent high tides and intense storms.

The warming oceans are already affecting sea life and disrupting fisheries. Arctic sea ice continues to decline, contributing to milder winters and warmer summers in the north.

Millions of young people worldwide took to the streets on Friday, the culmination of a week-long series of protests. Their hero, Greta Thunberg, spoke again at the UN this week, scolding world leaders for their inaction and instigating a memorable social media exchange with the U.S. president (and an equally memorable Bruce MacKinnon cartoon on Wednesday).

The protests had been led by high school students taking Fridays off school to carry signs and demonstrate.

But all over the world, millions of older students, office workers and just plain concerned citizens are joining them.

They’re all justifiably worried about their future.

Who wouldn’t be, if they were hearing such warnings from scientists? Who should they trust? The experts? Or a bunch of middle-aged politicians content to kick the climate can down the road for the next generation to deal with?

It’s easy to understand their anger and frustration.

We have an opportunity in Canada, right now, to insist that people running for office make addressing the climate crisis a priority.

Let’s hold their feet to the fire.

--------------------------
And I think we will need to hold the feet of The Guardian, CBC and other media, to the fire, to live up to this commitment, certainly by accurate reporting and minimizing focusing on what really are just distractions.
--------------------
Tuesday, September 24th, 2019: "Climate First" Halifax stop

The two self-described "Old Silverbacks", David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis, talked to a group of people of all ages (including one of my kids, myself, and Island actor and environmentalist Catherine O'Brien) at the Rebecca Cohn auditorium Tuesday, September 24th. (All opinions and errors on their talk are my own.)

Sharing the stage with Suzuki and Lewis were Mi'kmaq elder and filmmaker Catherine Martin (info about her NFB documentary Mi'kmaq Family (Migmaoei Otjiosog) is here) and youth leaders in the Maritimes.

The evening's emcee was finishing graduate work in Indigenous Studies, and the two panelists were one of the high school Climate Strikes organizers and the Dalhousie University's sustainability office student manager.

A vibrant Buffy Sainte Marie appeared on screen by video to send her message of courage and hope, followed by a dynamic music video.


David Suzuki looked both just as energetic, and at times just as weary, as he had in Summerside five or so years ago on the marathon Blue Dot (Environmental Rights) tour, and was greeted with enthusiasm and affection.
He spoke that for most of human history, their outlook on the world was "Ecocentric", where we survived and flourished due to Nature's bounty, and most cultures has some ideas about taking care of the Nature that sustained them. Presumably due to low population numbers, the ability or inability to take care of nature didn't play such a critical role.
Now we have more of an "Anthrogenic" view, with humans as the complete focus. And our economy model, which we all bow down to, is based on the model for cancer! (unlimited growth and kill your host!)
And in this model and our ways of governance, government ministers protect the people that want to use the resources, not all the people and the resources.

Suzuki described a paper published in 1992, a paper signed by half the Nobel Prize winners and such, which wrote that we were headed on a collision course with destruction unless we:
1) bring environmental damage under control
2) manage resources much better
3) stablize the Earth's population
4) reduce and eliminate pollution
5) make sure females have reproductive control

But instead, we have an elevation of human consumer needs above any all. Still on the collision course.

We need everyone to tell their politicians "My vote is based on your climate policies."

------------------------
Catherine Martin described so much about respecting traditional values, of walking on this Earth, of acknowledging wrongs in the past and moving forward. Of getting outside in Nature, all of us, especially children, for most of the day. 

She urged us to empower youth, to step aside and support and protect "All the other Gretas".
---------------------------------
Stephen Lewis started by quoting Greta Thunberg, "How Dare You?" His legendary use of gorgeous and precise descriptive words made him sound like a laser show appears. He listed somnolescent world leaders, the cowardice of the G20 countries who are responsible for 80% of the world's fossil fuel emissions, and from Canada at this most recent International Panel on Climate Change, an embarrassing and infuriating "Cone of Silence".

They are dinosaurs drunk on fossil fuels, and everything is political with the astonishing fealty to corporations.
WHAT PRICE HYPOCRISY? he thundered, as Canada declared a climate emergency and bought a pipeline in less than 24 hours time.

But Lewis said momentum is building -- the World Climate Strike the week before, the Youth March, continued weekly protests, October 11 when the Nobel Peace Prize is announced and he fully expects Greta Thunberg to be the recipient. The Canadian election on October 21st, events in November, and so forth.
And for those who pot-shot that there is no plan, that it is unattainable, he countered that there is a platform -- the IBCC has written it, Green New Deal is spelling it out, it's all the Art of Possible. Youth can confront the malevolent refrain of "business as usual", the inherited tsunami of greed, the clunk of politicians, by getting out marching, actions and voting, and we will have their backs every step of the way.


David also mentioned: It's a knife in my heart that to see and hear the kids, and that they realize what we are leaving them. (His Foundation produced this funny but truly believable short video called "Eighteen to Eight.ca" about kids campaigning that the voting age be lowered to eight years.)

Their suggestions on practical things we can do to carry on the momentum from their talk:
1) vote climate first
2) join youth strikers and additional events like Fridays for Future (which, by the way, Extinction Rebellion PEI is holding every Friday in October, 3:30PM, Province House)
3) take tangible action -- sign pledges/ talk to 5 people/ help canvass with a candidate / bring it up with more people / give money if you can / remember small actions help.
----------------------------
"Just as man cannot live without dreams, he cannot live without hope. If dreams reflect the past, hope summons the future."
--- Elie Wiesel (1928-2016)

September 28, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Farmers' Markets open:
Charlottetown -- 9AM-2PM
Summerside -- 9AM-1PM
Murray Harbour Farmers Market, 9AM-noon
George's in Bedeque -- 10AM-2PM


Climate Emergency signs for sale:
Printed lawn and window signs in bright yellow and red that read:
CLIMATE EMERGENCY
ACT NOW!

Reasonably priced, they are available at the Farmers' Market in Charlottetown, Or call Mike at (902) 569-8688.

---------------------------
TREC Talk with Gary Schneider, on Landscaping with Native Plants, 1:30-4:30PM, North Granville Community Centre, 575 Taylor Road, North Granville.
Trout River Environmental Committee (TREC) has partnered with Gary Schneider from Macphail Woods Ecological Centre. "This will be a great chance to learn to identify native shrubs, ferns and wildflowers and learn which wildlife will use the plants and where to put them in your yard and garden. After a presentation from Gary, we will walk woodland trails to find native plants and transplant them into the Trout River Committee's new Native Plant Garden at the Punchbowl Community Park." Free, suitable for anyone 12 years and up, participants encouraged to wear appropriate footwear and clothing and bring a water bottle.
Facebook event link

Tomorrow, Sunday, September 28th:
SHE IS Project Launch, 11AM, Victoria Row,

Join Patricia Bouque and Maria Campbell outside Receiver Coffee for an artists' talk and walk to visit the pieces. "SHE IS an awareness raising project activated by the report for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (NIMMIWG) with support provided from the PEI Arts Grants program though Innovation PEI....The project highlights the relationship between Indigenous and settler peoples, Mi'kmaq and English, artists Patricia (Bourque) and Maria (Campbell). It demonstrates the importance of shared involvement in the action-oriented recommendations put forward by the final report for the NIMMIWG."

Development and Peace (D&P)--Caritas Canada Annual Fall Action/Education Workshop, 2PM, MacKenzie Room, St. Pius X Church, Parkdale.
edited from the media release:
The Guest Speaker is Luke Stocking, Toronto, Deputy Director for D&P for Atlantic Canada and Ontario. The Theme: For Our Common Home focuses on the Amazon, the lungs of the earth and source of one-fifth of the world’s fresh water. Defenders of the Amazon work under conditions of great danger including threats to their lives. All welcome.
---------------------------------
Thursday, October 3rd:
Environmental Forums -- for each Riding on P.E.I.

from Don't Frack P.E.I.'s posting:

Around the world, we are seeing dramatic shifts in technology and people’s behaviour to help address environmental problems. Here on Prince Edward Island, we are playing our part by banning single-use plastic shopping bags, installing heat pumps in our homes, retrofitting buildings to make them more efficient, growing/buying local food, and separating our compost and recyclables as part of our province-wide WasteWatch system – to name just a few.

But while individual action can make an important contribution to addressing problems like climate change, complex environmental challenges can’t be solved without government leadership. That’s why on Thursday, October 3, 2019, several organizations from across the Island* are organizing all-candidates’ forums in all four of the Island’s federal ridings. The Institute of Island Studies will host the Charlottetown Forum at the Duffy Amphitheatre, with Dr. Jim Randall serving as Moderator.

The environment is a top issue for Canadians. Nationally, 57% of voters indicate that they are at least “very concerned” by climate change and 31% say it will be a priority issue for them when they go to the polls. Our organizations and many members of the community hope that you will attend this debate so we can better understand your position on critical environmental issues.

Public polling consistently shows support for environmental leadership has never been higher, but this kind of support doesn’t always translate into action from our elected leaders. The debate on October 3, two weeks before the federal election, will put candidates face-to-face with voters who want bold, urgent action on the environment.

Be sure to mark your calendars – October 3, 7-9 p.m. – for these all-candidates’ debates. Here’s where they’ll be:
Malpeque – Hunter River Community Centre
Charlottetown – Duffy Amphitheatre, University of Prince Edward Island
Cardigan – Kaylee Hall, Pooles Corner
Egmont – Linkletter Community Centre

For more information, please contact:
Egmont: Barbara Graham (Barbara.bubbles.graham@gmail.com)
Malpeque: Ann Wheatley, Environmental Coalition of PEI (ann.wheatley@bellaliant.net)
Charlottetown: Laurie Brinklow, Institute of Island Studies, UPEI (brinklow@upei.ca)
Cardigan: Maureen Kerr (kerr.maureen@gmail.com)

*Participating organizations include the Environmental Coalition of PEI, the Institute of Island Studies, Pesticide Free PEI, PEI Environmental Health Cooperative, Cooper Institute, Save our Seas and Shores PEI, PEI Chapter of the Council of Canadians, Atlantic Canada Chapter of the Sierra Club, Blue Dot PEI, Citizens’ Alliance of PEI, Don’t Frack PEI, Nature PEI, Latin American Mission Program, Happy Ocean PEI, UPEI Environmental Society, Friends of Covehead & Brackley Bay, Coalition for the Protection of PEI Water, Green Economy Network, Trade Justice PEI, Green Economy Network, PEI Watershed Alliance.
-------------------------------------------------------
From the P.E.I. Certified Organic Producers Co-operative newsletter:

Well known local organic wholesaler, Lee Clarke recently experienced a serious accident which destroyed his delivery van and caused him serious physical injury. A Go Fund Me page has been established to help him get back on his feet. Please check it out!
-----------------------------
Inspiring words from the Youth4ClimateMarch in Charlottetown yesterday, Friday, September 27th, 2019, photos by me and most (except big crowd photo at end) taken with permission of the sign-maker. We need to vote #ClimateFirst -- whatever Party you think that is, and these kids got that it has to be a working-together process -- to put our words, and these kids' future hopes, into action:

 



















September 27, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Event:

Climate March, led by Youth4ClimatePEI, 12noon, outside Province House at Grafton Street side, Charlottetown. Be there if you can, for any amount of time you can.
Plan to vote, and talk to others about voting #climatefirst
When you stop and think about it, it is all that matters.

*OK, Books may matter next, and the Confed Library Used Book Sale is going on right next door (9:30AM-5PM) today, tomorrow and 12:30-3PM Sunday).

**And politics matter, too, with the Standing Committee on Rules and all that stuff meeting at 10AM today at the Coles Building, right next door, too.
----------------------------
"Act with kindness, but do not expect gratitude." --- Confucius

September 26, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Thursday Farm Centre Market, 3-6PM, Farm Centre front parking area, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.

Tonight:
Young Greens Drinks, 7-9PM, bar1911.
"This is an informal social for all those Green and Green-curious. Memberships will be available. Anyone 35 y/o and under welcome!"
--------------------------
Friday, September 27th:
Standing Committee on Rules, Regulations, Private Bills and Privileges, 10AM, Coles Building, all welcome. Also live-streamed here.
Topic: The committee will begin its consideration of the Rules of the Legislative Assembly. The committee will receive a briefing from Hon. Dennis King, Premier of Prince Edward Island.

Youth4Climate March, 12noon-2PM, outside Province House, Grafton Street, Charlottetown.
Join PEI Youth... as they participate in the Global Strike for Climate...Parents, Grandparents, Neighbours, Teachers, all Adults we need your support. “If not you, then who? If not now, then when?”
-----------------
Saturday, September 28th:
Fundraising Dinner for Malpeque Green MP candidate Anna Keenan, 7PM, PEI Preserve Company, tickets through link, here.
----------------------------
Save the Date!
Thursday, October 3rd:
Environmental Forums in all four P.E.I. Ridings
Locations and other details in an upcoming newsletter issue.
----------------------------
Opinion:
Yes, I thought the government response to Dorian overall was really not too
impressive, and glad the storm and damage were not worse.

http://www.peicanada.com/eastern_graphic/article_adef8cd8-d8ca-11e9-a560-1b491cf507dc.html?

Dorian response bruises premier - The Eastern Graphic article by publisher Paul MacNeill

Published on Wednesday, September 18th, 2019, in The Graphic publications

Dorian’s brutal winds carved a path of destruction from one tip of the Island to other, and in the aftermath socked the King government with its first major political bruise.

A political clock started ticking as Islanders gingerly took their first steps outside to take stock of the extraordinary damage. A week later patience for the King government’s response ran out for many.

In two interviews with CBC, radio and television, the premier looked and sounded less a leader and more a follower. It marked the first time since the election he has found himself back on his heels.

Part of the issue is admirable. King did not want to use the storm as a photo op. But the greater issue is the premier’s repeated explanation that Dorian kick-started an existing bureaucratic ‘process’ and it is his job to follow it.

What many Islanders are questioning is the rightness of the process, particularly when viewed against the action of the Nova Scotia government.

As a percentage of the population, more Islanders were left without power than our provincial neighbour. Yet, it was the Nova Scotia government that even before the full wrath of Dorian was known, accepted a federal offer of military support to help clear debris, fallen trees and provide ‘comfort and support’. Nova Scotia also announced plans, three days before PEI, of emergency funding for those most in need on income assistance.

If you’re on income assistance and the power is out for two, three, four, five, six or more days, the announcement of help matters. If you are middle class and the freezer thaws and the sump pump stops working, assistance matters. If you’re a senior on fixed income, assistance matters.

The PC government did respond with a not insignificant $50,000 for Island food banks, but it failed to resonate with Islanders. In light of growing public criticism the administration announced PEI’s first ever disaster assistance program, without providing any specific details. The move triggers federal government support, which begs the question why the request was not made earlier. Nova Scotia did.

Our provincial response is led by EMO, a committee of 15 senior officials from across government. It determined, based on unknown criteria, that the military was not needed. The premier and cabinet agreed. There may be substance to the decision. Or it may be partially a case of protecting silos.

Regardless, the fact it took more than a week to get power restored to all Islanders says our response could have been better.

Luckily for the new government the bobbles of Dorian are unlikely to do it any long-term harm. In an act of inexplicable tone deafness, the Opposition Greens decided to re-announce its election housing platform Sept 11 when thousands of Islanders were still without power.

It smacked of a PR stunt at the launch of the federal election.

It failed. Two days later MLA Hannah Bell issued a release stating “Does government fully comprehend the challenges Islanders are facing as they try to rebuild their homes and communities?”

Great question. The Greens should have asked it of themselves before the party’s embarrassing blunder.

Politics aside there are real questions that need answering, not the least of which is why did we refuse military support and why did it take the King government a week to initiate the disaster assistance program?

Logistically, first responders saw communication systems crumble. For years we’ve been told by telco companies that cell phone apps are the way of the future, advice the PEI government accepted without question. Dorian proved them wrong. Georgetown Fire Chief Mark Gotell has argued against a Bell decision to phase out an effective pager system once used Island wide.

He was right. Provincially we need to push back against the corporate agenda of telco companies more interested in profit than public safety. We should also examine creation of a battery loan program for oxygen units. One of the most common causes of 911 calls during Dorian was oxygen units that stopped working when the power went out. With a modest public investment, we could minimize risk for first responders and save taxpayers the cost of a forced visit to an Island hospital.

For many, the King government failed to deliver ‘comfort and security’. Dorian could have been worse. No lives were lost. But there will be a next time and we must be better prepared.

That means learning from Dorian.

------------------------------

P.E.I. standing committee meeting on Dorian postponed - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Wednesday, September 25th, 2019

https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/pei-standing-committee-meeting-on-dorian-postponed-356144/

A special standing committee meeting to address the province’s response to post-tropical storm Dorian has been postponed.

The standing committee on health and social development had invited Premier Dennis King and Public Safety Minister Bloyce Thompson to attend a meeting on Tuesday to take questions from opposition MLAs about the response.

Last Thursday, the Liberal third party issued a media release indicating King and Thompson would appear. But on Friday, Opposition members were informed King and Thompson would not be coming.

A statement from the premier’s office said it was premature for King to comment on recovery efforts, as the P.E.I. Emergency Measures Organization was still conducting its work.

“The P.E.I. EMO is still in the midst of leading and co-ordinating the provincial recovery effort following hurricane Dorian. The premier and minister have deferred their attendance at standing committee until the P.E.I. EMO is done carrying out this important work so that a more fulsome review and debrief can take place,” the statement said.

The representative from the premier’s office told The Guardian no standing committee meeting had been formally scheduled for Tuesday.

King told The Guardian he hoped to answer questions before a standing committee meeting in two to three weeks.

“The EMO is still in a recovery phase,” King said.

Representatives from both Liberal and Green opposition caucuses said they had believed the premier and Thompson would be able to attend the meeting on Tuesday.

Liberal MLA Gord McNeilly, however, acknowledged formal confirmation to attend was not received from either man.

Both Liberal and Green opposition members have criticized the leadership of King’s government during the storm recovery efforts. Tignish-Palmer Road Liberal MLA Hal Perry criticized the week-long closure of the Access P.E.I. office in Tignish, while Green MLA for Charlottetown-Belvedere Hannah Bell issued a statement criticizing the lack of communications technology for volunteer fire departments in communities like Alberton.

“Government should not expect Islanders to bear the brunt of a disaster when it is within the means of government to plan and prepare for such an inevitability. Especially when evidence that these types of weather events are increasing in severity worldwide,” Bell’s statement said.

In a phone interview, McNeilly said constituents had expressed “massive” concerns about the cost of lost food items due to lengthy power outages.

“I’ve heard a lot of confusion,” McNeilly said, referring to communication to Islanders in the days after the storm.

“Were we ready for these types of things?”

----------------------------
Note that the Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability is meeting on Thursday, October 3rd, and Maritime Electric representatives were scheduled weeks and weeks ago to talk about meeting customer needs and demand grows. As far as I know, that is still the topic and all are welcome to join in the Gallery or watch at home on the live-steam.
--------------------------------------------
"Live all you can; it's a mistake not to. It doesn't so much matter what you do in particular, so long as you have your life. If you haven't had that what have you had"
--- Henry James (1843-1916)

September 25, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Charlottetown's Farmers' Market, 9AM-2PM, Belvedere Avenue

Standing Committee on Health and Social Development, 2PM, Coles Building
Topic: The committee will begin its consideration of Motion No. 1 (Calling on the Legislative Assembly to refer wellness to the appropriate committee). The committee will receive a briefing from Dr. Heather Morrison, Chief Public Health Officer and Dr. David Sabapathy, Deputy Chief Public Health Officer.. Watch in the Gallery or live at the Legislative Assembly website.

Charlottetown Candidates' Forum, 7PM, bar1911, Sponsored by the Young Voters of PEI.

Maude Barlow, speaking on water, with a special celebration of Leo Broderick, former National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians, 7PM, Rodds Charlottetown, Georgian Room. Free. Maude reminds us that we need to protect our world's water, and that water is a human right. Always wonderful to hear Maude, and in addition to the critical election decisions ahead of us, in this province, we will soon be critically examining the final set of regulations regarding the water act, the ones dealing with high capacity wells.
--------------------------------
David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis, with special guest Catherine Martin and others in the youth climate movement in the Halifax area, were inspiring, as one would expect. More later. In the meantime, always keep in mind that this election is about the climate first. And plan to support our P.E.I. kids by attending the Climate March Friday, noon, Province House.
-----------------------------
"Stories of imagination tend to upset those without one."
---Terry Pratchett

September 24, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Tonight:
Premier's Social, 6-8PM
, Brackley Commons. Hosted by the PC Party of PEI. "Join Premier Dennis King and the PC Party for a fall social. Food and drinks will be provided. This is a family-friendly event."
Facebook event link

Tonight:
David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis in their "Climate First" Tour stop, 7PM
, Dalhouse Arts Centre, Halifax. With Catherine Martin.
Facebook event link
-------------------------
Greta Thunberg, Monday, September 23rd, 2019, at the United Nations Climate Summit.
Please take 5 minutes and 19 seconds and listen to her. And Remember what she is saying, and Act on it every day.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAJsdgTPJpU&feature=youtu.be-a9ru0gcHzONaWmwC2RWm5PHnPodY-CBMPxkQ
-------------------------
"Try to be a rainbow in someone's cloud."
---Maya Angelou

September 23, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Today:
Charlottetown Eat Think Vote: federal election 2019 (Charlottetown Federal Candidates forum on food security), 4:45-7PM, Carrefoure l'isle-Sant-Jean, 5 Acadienne Drive.
"A candidates forum & community discussion on Food Security for the Charlottetown riding ahead of the federal election, topics will include food security and poverty, healthy school food, sustainable local agriculture and food systems, healthy diets and lifestyles, and more. Anyone with an interest in any of these issues, and curious where our federal candidates stand on them is encouraged to come!
The event will begin with food served and highlights of work in the community related to issues of food security, followed by a Q&A to the candidates.

This event is part of Eat Think Vote (eatthinkvote.ca), a non-partisan campaign coordinated by Food Secure Canada with events taking place from coast to coast to coast, encouraging communities to exchange with their federal candidates about how we can improve our food system. Thousands of people will be sharing about their day-to-day realities in food, their work around food, including successes and challenges faced, and candidates will be asked to respond to the food issues facing their constituencies and to speak about how they would implement the new Food Policy for Canada."

Rally with Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada, 7:30-9PM, Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre.

Tomorrow, Tuesday, September 24th:
Climate First event, with David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis, 7PM, Dalhousie University Arts Centre, Halifax. This is the East Coast stop on this tour. Suzuki, Lewis and guests are encouraging young people to consider the environment and the climate crisis and vote in the federal election in October.

A couple of us are going form the Island; contact me if interested.
----------------------------
Article: from Global Citizen https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/great-green-wall-explainer/

The Great Green Wall Is the Type of Utopian Project That Could Save the Planet - Global Citizen article by Joe McCarthy, Erica Sanches and Pia Gralki

Published on Wednesday, September 11th, 2019 at the link, above

While other walls divide people, this initiative is bringing people together.

                                                                    Why Global Citizens Should Care

                                    The Great Green Wall is an ambitious multinational project that seeks to
                                    restore landscapes across the Sahel region of Africa, while also creating
                                 jobs, food security, peace, and much more. As a result, it covers nearly all of
                                   the United Nations Global Goals. You can support the Great Green Wall here.

As rainforests burn and desertification spreads, a massive and utopian project is underway in one of the most environmentally degraded parts of the world — and it could serve as a model for saving the planet.

The Green Green Wall is an initiative seemingly pulled from a children’s book, with all the audacity and big-picture thinking that entails. It aims to plant trees and restore landscapes across one of the widest sections of Africa — an area known as the Sahel that stretches 8,000 kilometers, or 5,000 miles — creating a “wall” of verdant ecosystems in the process.

The Great Green Wall is about more than restoring degraded land. It’s about revitalizing communities and fostering sustainable economies, with the understanding that a healthy environment is the bedrock of any healthy society.

Take Action: Download the App and Show Your Support for a Great Green Wall Across Africa!

The Sahel region of Africa — spanning 10 countries with a combined population of more than 300 million — is beset by a dizzying array of challenges. Tens of millions of people live with chronic hunger. Conflict between and within countries regularly flares up. A general lack of opportunities causes young people to migrate to other parts of the world, often further contributing to geopolitical tensions.

And intertwined with everything — both causing and intensifying other problems — is the degradation of the natural world. Few places in the world have been as heavily affected by the consequences of climate change as the Sahel region.

Severe droughts, floods, and heat waves over the past few decades have ravaged agricultural systems. Small-scale farmers that could once rely upon predictable weather patterns have seen their crops wither and get destroyed with increasing frequency. As agricultural systems have faltered, extreme poverty, hunger, and conflict have risen.

Great Green Wall

Read More: How to Get Tickets to Global Citizen Festival 2019 in NYC

In Ethiopia, severe drought has pushed millions of people into food insecurity. In South Sudan, the breakdown of agriculture has helped to fuel widespread conflict. Nigeria, meanwhile, recently became the country with the highest number of people living in extreme poverty. More than 80% of jobs in the region are in agriculture, which means the economic repercussions of climate change grow each year.

The Great Green Wall was first established as a project in 2007 to fight all of these challenges as part of its holistic approach to development. The project, which has the support of 20 countries in Africa, also receives financial backing from the United Nations Development Programme, the World Bank, and the African Forest Forum. The project received $4 billion USD in 2015 at the UN Climate Conference in Paris, with further commitments from countries like France.

The Great Green Wall aims to

· improve soil quality for farmers, which would allow crops to better withstand hostile conditions;

· create wildlife corridors that revitalize ecosystems and become hubs of tourism;

· restore sources of water to combat drought;

· generate millions of green economy jobs;

· establish a carbon sink to fight climate change;

· break the vicious cycles of migration that are draining societies of youth;

· boost economies;

· and ease the conditions that lead to violence.

Already, the Great Green Wall is bearing fruit.
(the link has the trailer video)

In Senegal, more than 12 million drought-resistant trees have been planted. More than 15 million hectares of land have been restored in Ethiopia, 5 million hectares in Nigeria, and 5 million in Niger. In Burkina Faso, local communities have used traditional practices to restore 3 million hectares of land.

“By 2030, the Wall aims to restore 100 million hectares of currently degraded land, sequester 250 million tonnes of carbon and create 10 million jobs in rural areas,” the project’s website explains.

Getting to this goal will not be easy. Roughly 15% of the Great Green Wall has been completed since work began more than a decade ago. Reaching the 2030 goal requires significant financial support from countries around the world and private sector partners. Further, countries across the Sahel need to dedicate more resources to the project and foster job creation by developing supply chains and markets for the people benefiting from the rejuvenated landscapes.

The return on investment of the wall seems self-evident — fighting climate change, promoting sustainable economic development, and ending conflict. Whereas walls are increasingly being used as barriers between countries, the architects of the Great Green Wall envision a transnational band of thriving life that unifies rather than divides.


On Saturday, September 28th, 2019:

The 2019 Global Citizen Festival in New York will be presented by Citi and Cisco and in association with our Production Partner, Live Nation. MSNBC, Comcast NBCUniversal, and iHeart will serve as Presenting Media Partners and will air a live simulcast of the Festival on MSNBC and on iHeart Radio Stations.

The Festival will also be livestreamed on YouTube and Twitter, presented by Johnson & Johnson. Proud partners of the 2019 Global Citizen Festival include Global Citizen’s global health partner and major partner Johnson & Johnson, and major partners P&G, Verizon, and NYC Parks.
-------------------
"One of the deep secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others."
---Lewis Carroll (Charles Dodgson, 1832-1898)

September 22, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Downtown Farmers' Market, 11AM-4PM, Lower Queen Street

Tonight:
Book Launch: Healing Earth, by Dr. John Todd, 7PM, Duffy Hall, UPEI. Hosted by the Institute for Bioregional Studies Ltd. and UPEI Environmental Studies "....a stimulating book launch that is sure to arouse discussion and a vision of hope on how PEI can become a sustainable region.
John Todd is a biologist working in the field of ecological design. He addresses problems of food production and wastewater processing by using ecosystems technologies that incorporate plants, animals and bacteria. He combines alternative technologies for renewable energy, organic farming, aquaculture, hydroponics and architecture to create 'living machines' or 'eco-machines'; designed for sustainable living.
John Todd is a co-founder with Nancy Jack Todd of the non-profits New Alchemy Institute and PEI’s historic Spry Point Ark. He is president of the design and engineering firm ...and a research professor emeritus and distinguished lecturer at the University of Vermont." Facebook event link
--------------------------
Please note I will happily publish what's going on with political party leaders and their travels, and with local candidates; I would appreciate being sent any notices, since my reporting on this has lots of gaps. Saying that, I did see Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer's bus filling up at the Irving on University Avenue by China King restaurant yesterday.
-----------------------------
Green Party Leader Elizabeth May is heading to the Maritimes tomorrow until Wednesday:
Monday, September 23rd:

Fredericton, 1-2:30PM
Rally, etc. at Wilmot Park, 15 Saunders St.

Moncton, 4:30-5:30PM
Campaign office visit in Moncton with Claire Kelly (candidate for Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe), 327 Mountain Road
Charlottetown: Party Rally, 7:30-9PM, Confederation Centre of the Arts, Memorial Hall, all welcome. Facebook event link

Tuesday, September 24th
Campaigning in Sackville, NB, 11AM, with Laura Reinsborough (Beauséjour)

Halifax for the rest of the day

Wednesday, September 25th:
Green Party Rally at Halifax Train Station
, 12noon-12:45PM

"As Ms. May travels from Halifax to Montreal, she will hold brief Green Party rallies at train stations en route."

Whistlestops (subject to change)

Halifax NS 12:45pm departure
Truro 2:31pm departure
Amherst 4:08pm departure
Sackville NB 4:25pm departure

Moncton NB 5:17pm arrival 5:32pm departure
Miramichi 7:37pm departure
Bathurst 9:28pm departure
Campbellton 11:18pm departure

--------------------------
Tuesday, September 24th:
Climate First Event, with David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis
, 7PM, Dalhousie Arts Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax.

Wednesday, September 25th:
Maude Barlow, on Water
, Council of Canadians sponsored, 7PM, Rodd's Charlottetown. We will also give some well-deserved hugs to Leo Broderick, outgoing National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians.
----------------------------
If you want to see some compelling (and some very funny) signs from Friday's Climate Strike around the world, which might inspire you or a young person for this Friday's Youth-led Summit Strike, here is a link to a Washington Post article. with photos. A reminder the Youth4Climate is Friday, September 27th, at noon at the Grafton side of Province House.
--------------------
"This week, National Observer joins a consortium of 220 media outlets committed to improving climate coverage. The collaboration called Covering Climate Now aims to convene and inform a conversation about how the media can do justice to the defining crisis of our time." At the Columbia Journalism Review:
https://www.cjr.org/covering_climate_now/?

The National Observer has a lot of good stories this week, if you are taking a break from being out in the gorgeous late summer day to do some reading (or waiting until the same late summer dew dries up a bit):
https://www.nationalobserver.com/
------------------------------
"What after all, has maintained the human race on this old globe despite all the calamities of nature and all the tragic fallings of mankind, if not faith in new possibilities, and courage to advocate them."
--- Jane Addams (1860-1936), social worker and activist

September 21, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events today:
Farmers' Markets open:
Charlottetown -- 9AM-2PM
Summerside -- 9AM-1PM
Murray Harbour Farmers Market, 9AM-noon
George's in Bedeque -- 10AM-2PM
Cardigan Farmers' Market, 10AM-2PM

Climate Emergency signs for sale:

Printed lawn and window signs in bright yellow and red that read:
CLIMATE EMERGENCY
ACT NOW!

They are 9''x12''.
The lawn signs are weather-proof and sell for $8 with metal stand,
and the window signs are $2

They are available at:*Farmers' Markets in Cardigan and Charlottetown
Or call Mike at (902) 569-8688.

---------------------------
Tea Hill Disc Golf Tournament, in support of the Minkinduri Children of Hope Foundation, all day. Tea Hill Park, 492 Keppoch Road, Stratford. $10 registration at the site. Hosted by Rotary Club of Stratford.
"People can just show up at Tea Hill Park... and register there. No experience necessary. We provide all the equipment. Good fun for a good cause."
Facebook event link for more details

If you don't see any of your birding friends around, it is because they are all at:
Bennett Birding Classic, all day.
"Each year, teams with three to seven members gather pledges then head out in the wee hours of the morning to find as many species as possible in one 24-hour period."
Facebook event link

The Gloom and Doom Jubilee, 7-8:30PM, Victoria Row. Free. "...an artist based collective of climate change concerned folks, are helping to raise awareness of Global Climate Strike Week with a multimedia event...
It includes the talents of musicians Russell Louder, The Lxvendr Effect, Poet-Laureate Julie Pellissier-Lush, Poet Tanya Davis, and the River Clyde Pageant performers, projections of information/climate themed art by local artists and more! Get involved in the action while enjoying the art it inspires. For questions/info on The Doom and Gloom Jubilee - contact Mille at 902-388-7234 or onethousandflowers@gmail.com"

If you just need some darkness and stars...
September Stargazing, 7-9PM, Macphail Woods, Orwell Corner, free. Learn about the night sky and get to know some constellations. This outing will teach some basics of astronomy and then head out into the dark for naked-eye stargazing.
Facebook event link

Tomorrow, Sunday, September 22nd:
Book Launch: Healing Earth, by Dr. John Todd, 7PM, Duffy Hall, UPEI. Hosted by the Institute for Bioregional Studies Ltd. and UPEI Environmental Studies "....a stimulating book launch that is sure to arouse discussion and a vision of hope on how PEI can become a sustainable region.
John Todd is a biologist working in the field of ecological design. He addresses problems of food production and wastewater processing by using ecosystems technologies that incorporate plants, animals and bacteria. He combines alternative technologies for renewable energy, organic farming, aquaculture, hydroponics and architecture to create 'living machines' or 'eco-machines'; designed for sustainable living.
John Todd is a co-founder with Nancy Jack Todd of the non-profits New Alchemy Institute and PEI’s historic Spry Point Ark. He is president of the design and engineering firm ...and a research professor emeritus and distinguished lecturer at the University of Vermont." Facebook event link
----------------------------
from: https://thetyee.ca/News/2019/09/16/Three-Big-Moves-To-Save-Threatened-Fisheries-Daniel-Pauly-UBC/

Daniel Pauly’s Three Big Moves to Save the World’s Threatened Fisheries - The Tyee article by Andrew Nikiforuk

If the UBC expert was global fisheries minister for a day, here’s what he’d do.

Published on Monday, September 16th, 2019

Daniel Pauly, one of the world’s leading fishery scientists, has spent decades documenting global overfishing.

In the last 60 years, globalization has transformed largely sustainable, small-scale local fishing enterprises into something very different. Now “largely corporate-owned and controlled” fleets subsidized by taxpayers roam the world’s oceans, depleting fish stocks either legally or illegally, Pauly says.

Pauly’s pioneering and often provocative work has shed light on what the scientist calls “the toxic triad of fisheries” — the under-reporting of catches, overfishing and the tendency to blame depleted catches on “the environment.”

So what would Pauly do if he became a sort of global fishery minister? Just how would he renew the globe’s depleted fisheries? The scientist, who has a reputation for bluntness, doesn’t hesitate for a minute, rattling off three major reforms. Everything hinges on going back to the future, says Pauly.

1. End government subsidies for industrial fishing fleets

“First, I would try to abolish subsidies,” he says. “It would have a huge effect globally. All the fishery scientists and free marketers would be happy with me.”

The major global fishing companies receive some $20 billion to $30 billion a year in government subsidies, he said, which encourages them to continue fishing even as stocks are depleted. Industry subsidies in countries such as Spain and Russia support large trawling fleets, mainly by assisting with their fuel bills.

That’s resulted in such overcapacity that the global fishing fleets have twice the capacity required for all the fisheries on Earth. Ending the subsidies would mean they wouldn’t fish in areas where catches are falling and profits shrinking. “It would eliminate all marginal fisheries,” Pauly says.

Reducing the size of the world’s industrial fleet would bring a wide range of benefits and few disadvantages. The ships employ lots of horsepower and technology, but few people. Their fuel use per tonne of fish landed has been increasing, Pauly notes. The industrial fleet also generates 10 million tonnes of waste fish every year. And one-third of its catch goes to animal feed for intensive livestock operations on land or sea.

Pauly says multilateral action is needed to end harmful subsidie. In other words, all fishing nations must end or reduce subsidies that encourage overfishing at the same time, under the same rules. The World Trade Organization is probably best equipped to manage the process, Pauly says.

2. Create fishing reserves for small, local fisheries

Next, Pauly would focus on creating exclusive zones for small fisheries. “I would create a zone of 30 to 40 kilometres around every country, reserved for small-scale fisheries that don’t drag nets over the ocean bottom.”

Small fisheries employ large numbers of local people. They use less fuel per pound of fish caught. They tend not to waste fish. And they provide local food for local people. “We should encourage carefully managed, owner-operated, small-scale fisheries operating in home-country waters,” he says. “Industrial fisheries shouldn’t operate inshore. All they do is destroy things,” adds Pauly.

3. Establish no-go zones to protect fish

Last but not least, Pauly would establish large marine reserves where no fishing is allowed. “I would set up a network of large protected areas,” he says.

He says a ban on fishing in the high seas — the ocean far from coasts — should be considered.

“It wouldn’t decline the catch too much,” he says. But it would ensure there were places were fish were protected from commercial predation. Tuna, for example, could still be caught in coastal areas. But the open ocean would provide a protected space.

The research on marine reserves shows conclusively that by every measure — the number of fish, their size and diversity — they allow stocks to rebound even after overfishing. A 2017 study reported that the biomass of fish in marine reserves is “on average 670 per cent greater than in adjacent unprotected areas.”

Although marine reserves aren’t immune to the effects of climate change, protecting their complex ecosystems help them remain more resilient than unprotected areas.

Canada, which has the world’s longest coastline, has committed to protecting only 10 per cent of its oceans. To date, only five per cent of the Arctic coastline has been protected.

“We need protected areas where big fish can roam. You cannot have giraffes in a network of potato fields. High seas could be closed, and technically it would be easy to monitor by satellite.”

After that, says Pauly, he would rest on his laurels.

“Each of these things is feasible and will probably have to be done if we want a global fishery within 50 years,” Pauly says. These changes wouldn’t entirely solve the fishery problem, he says, “but provide the architecture” for recovery

The world has a stark choice, he says. “You can rebuild abundance, or you can sustain misery.” Most countries now simply seek to sustain stocks that are badly depleted, rather than take action to rebuild them. “I would encourage all countries to have an explicit program to restore stock health,” Pauly says.

He notes that Canada has nothing like the Magnuson–Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act. It was passed in 1976 in the U.S. to stop overfishing. It created regional management councils and specifically mandated that overfished populations be allowed to rebuild to their former abundance.

Pauly views it as one of the best pieces of legislation for protecting fish stocks because its execution is clear, rule-based and penalties are set. It does not allow for “ministerial discretion” as is common in Canada and Europe.

In Canada, too many decisions about fisheries are based on political considerations and ignore science and catch data.

A recent decision boosting cod quotas on the east coast and herring quotas on the west coast, for example, came directly from a federal minister’s office.

Canadian politicians routinely intervene in decisions on quotas and fisheries management, Pauly says. The decisions should be based on science, he adds.

“The minister interfering is like having the attorney general interfering in a court case,” Pauly says. In the legal system, judges and jury do their thing, he says. And in fisheries management, scientists should be allowed to work with real data and make decisions.

For a fisheries minister to intervene and set a quota is equivalent to an attorney general recommending to a judge that the accused should be given 10 years in jail “because I don’t like them,” says Pauly. “It is conflict of interest and absurd.”

The whole point of the reforms, says Pauly, is to stop giant, government-subsidized corporations from continuing to exploit badly depleted fisheries and allow fish populations and ecosystems to rebound back to health.

That will only happen if politicians quit serving industry and allow science to drive fishery policies, he says.

And if they work for the coastal communities that care about fish.

Andrew Nikiforuk is an award-winning journalist who has been writing about the energy industry for two decades and is a contributing editor to The Tyee. 
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"You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."
--- Malcolm Forbes

September 20, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Fridays for Future/beginning of Global Climate Strike Week, 3:30PM, Province House (Grafton Street side).
"Starting on Friday 20th, September we will kick start a week of climate action with a worldwide strike for the climate. This week of action will end by Earth Strike -- a global general strike on September 27th"
Facebook event link
Students will be leading the event next Friday, September 27th, starting at 12noon.

Tonight:
Cardigan Riding Green Candidate (Glen Beaton) Campaign Launch, 7-9PM, Robert Cotton Centre, Stratford. "Whether you are Green, Green-curious, or just curious - come and help launch Green Party Candidate, Glen Beaton's campaign. Meet and chat with Glen and his team, find out about campaign plans and events and do what Greens do across the country - have Fun! Refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome."
Cardigan candidates are:
Glen Beaton, Green Party
Lawrence Macaulay, Liberal
Wayne Phelan, Conservative
Lynne Thiele, NDP

Tomorrow, Saturday, September 21st:
Taste Our Island Roving Feast, 7-9PM, Delta Hotel. "Taste, rove and mingle with culinary artisan chefs who are the finalists for the prestigious, ‘Taste Our Island Award;’ based on the outstanding quality of their cuisine and their use of local produce." Organized and hosted by the Institute for Bioregional Studies (and part of Fall Flavours). Tickets ($65+HST) still available through this Facebook event link
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Articles:
While the news has been preoccupied with particular stories, here are two that deserve attention:

Climate Crisis/Extreme Weather:
Houston, Texas, has been swamped by Post Tropical Depression Imelda:
News and Guts story and footage on Houston, Texas

Local Rank and Rancor:
Nova Scotia government, which smells about as bad as driving by the pulp mill, had a secret deal to share the cost of the environmental assessment: https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/news/provincial/nova-scotia-had-secret-pact-with-northern-pulp-to-share-environmental-assessment-costs-353558/

Nova Scotia had secret pact with Northern Pulp to share environmental assessment costs  - The Chronicle-Herald article by Aaron Beswick

Published on Tuesday, September 17th, 2019, in The Chronicle-Herald (and later, The Guardian)

Court sides with Pictou Landing First Nation over province in pulp mill dispute

The province made a secret agreement with Northern Pulp to pay part of the cost of producing its environmental assessment documents.

Furthermore, it contractually forbade Northern Pulp from revealing any details of the agreement to the taxpayer.

“Except as required by law, regulatory or judicial authority, Northern Pulp shall keep private and confidential and not make public or divulge any information or material relative to this agreement without having first obtained the written consent of the province,” reads a clause in a 2016 funding agreement between the province and the Abercrombie Point mill.

While that original agreement only allowed for $300,000 for design and engineering costs, it was amended in September.2017 to include up to $250,000 toward the preparation of an environmental assessment. Two months later it was amended again to oblige the province to reimburse up to $8 million for design and engineering work, along with any other costs the province considered reasonable.

The mill ultimately billed the province $6 million under that agreement, but never said if any of that money went toward preparing the environmental assessment that was registered this spring.

The government couldn’t confirm by deadline Tuesday whether that happened.

The agreements were filed as evidence by Northern Pulp with the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal in a failed attempt by the province to avoid consulting the Pictou Landing First Nation on its funding of the construction of Northern Pulp’s controversial proposed new effluent treatment facility.

In a written decision released Tuesday, the court threw out the province’s appeal of a lower court’s ruling.

“Nowhere does Northern Pulp’s fresh evidence suggest it would build the new (effluent treatment facility) without the province’s funding,” reads the decision.

“... There is a distinct potential that, without the province’s contribution, Northern Pulp would decline to pay the full amount required for the new (effluent treatment facility) and would be content to sue the province for the alleged breach of the lease. Then the mill would not obtain a new industrial approval after January 30, 2020, and would close, ending the discharge of contaminants that adversely impacts (the Pictou Landing First Nation).”

Province not unbiased, decision says

The three-judge panel accepted the Pictou Landing First Nation’s reasoning that because the province has been negotiating how much the taxpayer will fund Northern Pulp’s new effluent treatment facility behind closed doors, the province was contributing to the mill’s continued operation and thereby its continued pollution of the community.

The judges also uphold the lower court’s opinion that it is reasonable to conclude the provincial government will not provide an unbiased environmental assessment of the project.

“The funding agreements say the province ‘approves’ the items of design, engineering and environmental assessment before paying Northern Pulp,” reads the decision.

“Once the province approves under the funding agreements, would there be an about-face that denies approval under the Environment Act? Likely, the contractual approval would facilitate the statutory approvals.”

The ruling points to a 1995 memorandum of understanding signed between Northern Pulp’s former owners and the province in which the government “contracted to give approvals” for a new effluent treatment facility.

Northern Pulp has stated it will answer an extensive list of questions about its proposed effluent treatment site by the end of this month. Once it does that the public has 30 days to comment and then the provincial environment minister has another 25 days to decide whether to approve the project.

Pictou Landing First Nation lawyer Brian Hebert said Tuesday the ruling provides further proof that the project should have gone for a longer federal environmental assessment.

“Our client felt quite strongly that the province had so many irons in the fire and such a large history of co-operation with the mill that they wouldn’t get an unbiased environmental assessment unless it was federal,” said Hebert.

But Trudeau’s Liberal government has repeatedly punted the decision down the field on whether it would demand the more time-consuming federal assessment.

A Chronicle Herald freedom of information request showed that the federal government received a recommendation from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency this spring on whether it should take over responsibility from the province. But the recommendation itself was redacted.

Central Nova MP Sean Fraser said earlier this month that the federal environment minister has since asked for a new recommendation. But the assessment agency won’t have to provide that recommendation until after the Oct. 21 federal election.

-------------------------------------------------
Some David Suzuki for this week - and remember, he and Stephen Lewis will be in Halifax,
Tuesday, September 24th, for a Climate First event at Dalhousie University
's Arts Centre. More details here, and contact me for possible car-pooling.

Let’s all support the global climate strikes! - David Suzuki Foundtion article by David Suzuki with contributions from senior writer Ian Hanington

Published on Friday, September 20th, 2019

No one who understands science questions whether humans are causing the climate to change to our detriment, mostly by burning fossil fuels. The evidence is indisputable. It’s been verified and accepted by every reputable scientific institution in the world, and by almost every government except the current, fact-averse U.S. administration.

The only real debate is about how best to address it. Do we need mitigation or adaptation? Is a carbon tax or cap-and-trade more effective? Should we reform agricultural practices?

The truth is that we need to deploy every available solution quickly and keep developing new ones. Thanks largely to efforts by the fossil fuel industry and its supporters in media, governments and the public to sow doubt and confusion for decades about the overwhelming scientific evidence, we’ve stalled so much that addressing the crisis gets harder daily, especially because carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases remain in the atmosphere for many years, and will continue to alter the climate even after we slow or halt emissions — if we do.

Many young people understand what their elders have failed to grasp: we’re jeopardizing their futures.

Because adults aren’t acting quickly enough to solve the crisis, despite the abundance of solutions, young people are stepping up and speaking out in many ways and places. The #FridaysForFuture climate strikes have grown into a worldwide movement since then 15-year-old student Greta Thunberg began her solitary strike outside Sweden’s parliament a year ago.

Thunberg recently arrived in New York, after a cross-Atlantic journey in a zero-emissions yacht, gearing up for a week of climate action from September 20 to 27 that includes the Friday strikes, a UN youth climate summit on September 21 and a global UN climate action summit on September 23. She also plans to attend the September 27 Montreal climate strike.

Youth are asking everyone to join the strikes and activities. The main Canadian strikes are on September 27.

Youth are asking everyone to join the strikes and activities. The main Canadian strikes are on September 27, but you can find when and where they’ll be in your area at globalclimatestrike.net/. According to 350.org, more than 2,500 strikes have been registered in 117 countries.

Although skipping work or school to march in the streets may be out of some people’s comfort zones, the strikes offer an important opportunity to let decision-makers know that we, the people, want action.

“We strike so that in the United Nations meeting, when they speak, it is with our beliefs on their tongues. We strike so that when they raise their hands to vote, it is with the weight of our vision hanging from the tips of their fingers. We strike so that when they stand, it will be with the might of the youth, the workers, and the people,” School Strike for Climate Australia’s Evan Meneses said.

Among other things, climate strikers are asking for a rapid shift from fossil fuel energy to renewables; respect for Indigenous land, sovereignty and treaties; environmental justice that includes supporting those most affected by pollution and poverty; protecting and restoring biodiversity and habitat; and moving toward sustainable or regenerative agriculture.

As adults, we owe it to the youth and those not yet born to do everything in our power to ensure they have a livable future, with clean air, drinkable water, healthy food, biodiverse life and a stable climate.

As adults, we owe it to the youth and those not yet born to do everything in our power to ensure they have a livable future, with clean air, drinkable water, healthy food, biodiverse life and a stable climate. Dropping what you’re doing for one or more days to get out and march may not sound like much, but the more people show up, the louder the message to governments, media, industry and society.

Many of us grew up in times and places when we didn’t fully realize that our postwar shift to consumerism as economic policy was depleting Earth’s resources and throwing natural systems and cycles, including the carbon cycle, out of balance. We maybe had an inkling that some wealth in the developed world came at the expense of people in poorer nations, but we didn’t consider that driving around in large vehicles and burning gas were doing much more than causing some pollution, easily resolved by removing lead from gas and making fuel-efficient cars.

Now we’ve known for decades where the planet is headed if we continue with business as usual, and it’s not a human-friendly place.

Let’s all get out there to demand action — and show the kids we care!

Written by David Suzuki with contributions from Senior Editor and Writer Ian Hanington
-----------------------------------------------
from Sally Bernard, farmer at Barnyard Organics, on Thursday, September 19th, 2019:
The moment of death for a tender plant cell is not necessarily the onset of frost but the second the sun touches that frost, causing a thaw too quickly and the cell walls burst, resulting in dehydration and ultimately, death for that cell. Evidently some plants’ cells are stronger than others, like this lovely purple kale which only gets better with lower temps. But my tomatoes huddled underneath their blankets for the night will be saying goodbye to the leaves who couldn’t fit under the cover. And my vine crops who are so unwieldy and wild and refuse to grow tidily enough to get fully covered, or even reveal whose vines belong to which plant. I’ll be picking the pumpkins and gourds today, hoping I managed to cover my as-yet unripened squash.

It’s always a bit heartbreaking to see that beautiful glitter in the early morning, knowing that it marks the end for some crops, but there usually follows a resigned acceptance (and maybe even rejoicing) at a few less things to manage. A harbinger of the next season, one with less planting and more harvest, and at the end, sweet rest.
Goodbye cucurbits, hello autumn."
---Sally Bernard

September 19, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Special Legislative Committee on Climate Change, 10AM-12noon, Coles Building. Attend in the Gallery or watch on-line.
This committee will determine its work plan. Its mandate is here.

Poverty meeting, 2-4PM, Coles Building. Attend in the Gallery or watch on-line.
This committee is going to deal with clearing defining poverty on P.E.I., and is receiving a briefing today from the P.E.I. Working Group for a Livable Income.

Thursday Pop-up Farm Market at Farm Centre, 3-6PM, 420 University Avenue.

Meet and Greet with Malpeque Green Party candidate Anna Keenan, 6:30-8:30PM, Cornwall Town Hall (next to APM Centre), Lowther Drive, Cornwall.
"All are welcome to discuss the Green Party's platform, and hear ideas for how we can revolutionize Canada's current climate change plan, strengthen our democratic institutions, and fight for well-being and dignity for all. The event will start with a short speech from Anna, and move into Q&A and discussion."
Edited from the Facebook event link

Pints with Politicians, 7-9PM, The Fox and Crow (UPEI's Student Union pub), all welcome. "Join your Charlottetown candidates for an informal meet and greet at the Fox & Crow! You'll have the opportunity to mingle with them and learn more about their policies and party platforms.This event is open to everyone!" Candidates include But I don't know if confirmed: Joe Byrne, NDP; Sean Casey, Liberal Party; Darcie Lanthier, Green Party; Robert Campbell, Conservative.
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from: https://www.ecowatch.com/naomi-klein-climate-barbarism-2640400753.html

Naomi Klein: 'We Are Seeing the Beginnings of the Era of Climate Barbarism' - The Guardian (UK) article by Natalie Hanman

originally published on Tuesday, September 17th, 2019, in The Guardian (U.K.)

Natalie Hanman: Why are you publishing this book now?

Naomi Klein: I still feel that the way that we talk about climate change is too compartmentalised, too siloed from the other crises we face. A really strong theme running through the book is the links between it and the crisis of rising white supremacy, the various forms of nationalism and the fact that so many people are being forced from their homelands, and the war that is waged on our attention spans. These are intersecting and interconnecting crises and so the solutions have to be as well.

The book collects essays from the last decade, have you changed your mind about anything?

When I look back, I don't think I placed enough emphasis on the challenge climate change poses to the left. It's more obvious the way the climate crisis challenges a rightwing dominant worldview, and the cult of serious centrism that never wants to do anything big, that's always looking to split the difference. But this is also a challenge to a left worldview that is essentially only interested in redistributing the spoils of extractivism [the process of extracting natural resources from the earth] and not reckoning with the limits of endless consumption.

What's stopping the left doing this?

In a North American context, it's the greatest taboo of all to actually admit that there are going to be limits. You see that in the way Fox News has gone after the Green New Deal – they are coming after your hamburgers! It cuts to the heart of the American dream – every generation gets more than the last, there is always a new frontier to expand to, the whole idea of settler colonial nations like ours. When somebody comes along and says, actually, there are limits, we've got some tough decisions, we need to figure out how to manage what's left, we've got to share equitably – it is a psychic attack. And so the response [on the left] has been to avoid, and say no, no, we're not coming to take away your stuff, there are going to be all kinds of benefits. And there aregoing to be benefits: we'll have more livable cities, we'll have less polluted air, we'll spend less time stuck in traffic, we can design happier, richer lives in so many ways. But we are going to have to contract on the endless, disposable consumption side.

Do you feel encouraged by talk of the Green New Deal?

I feel a tremendous excitement and a sense of relief, that we are finally talking about solutions on the scale of the crisis we face. That we're not talking about a little carbon tax or a cap and trade scheme as a silver bullet. We're talking about transforming our economy. This system is failing the majority of people anyway, which is why we're in this period of such profound political destabilisation – that is giving us the Trumps and the Brexits, and all of these strongman leaders – so why don't we figure out how to change everything from bottom to top, and do it in a way that addresses all of these other crises at the same time? There is every chance we will miss the mark, but every fraction of a degree warming that we are able to hold off is a victory and every policy that we are able to win that makes our societies more humane, the more we will weather the inevitable shocks and storms to come without slipping into barbarism. Because what really terrifies me is what we are seeing at our borders in Europe and North America and Australia – I don't think it's coincidental that the settler colonial states and the countries that are the engines of that colonialism are at the forefront of this. We are seeing the beginnings of the era of climate barbarism. We saw it in Christchurch, we saw it in El Paso, where you have this marrying of white supremacist violence with vicious anti-immigrant racism.

That is one of the most chilling sections of your book: I think that's a link a lot of people haven't made.

This pattern has been clear for a while. White supremacy emerged not just because people felt like thinking up ideas that were going to get a lot of people killed but because it was useful to protect barbaric but highly profitable actions. The age of scientific racism begins alongside the transatlantic slave trade, it is a rationale for that brutality. If we are going to respond to climate change by fortressing our borders, then of course the theories that would justify that, that create these hierarchies of humanity, will come surging back. There have been signs of that for years, but it is getting harder to deny because you have killers who are screaming it from the rooftops.

One criticism you hear about the environment movement is that it is dominated by white people. How do you address that?

When you have a movement that is overwhelmingly representative of the most privileged sector of society then the approach is going to be much more fearful of change, because people who have a lot to lose tend to be more fearful of change, whereas people who have a lot to gain will tend to fight harder for it. That's the big benefit of having an approach to climate change that links it to those so called bread and butter issues: how are we going to get better paid jobs, affordable housing, a way for people to take care of their families?

I have had many conversations with environmentalists over the years where they seem really to believe that by linking fighting climate change with fighting poverty, or fighting for racial justice, it's going to make the fight harder. We have to get out of this "my crisis is bigger than your crisis: first we save the planet and then we fight poverty and racism, and violence against women". That doesn't work. That alienates the people who would fight hardest for change.

This debate has shifted a huge amount in the U.S. because of the leadership of the climate justice movement and because it is congresswomen of colour who are championing the Green New Deal. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaibcome from communities that have gotten such a raw deal under the years of neoliberalism and longer, and are determined to represent, truly represent, the interests of those communities. They're not afraid of deep change because their communities desperately need it.
In the book, you write: "The hard truth is that the answer to the question 'What can I, as an individual, do to stop climate change?' is: nothing."


Do you still believe that?

In terms of the carbon, the individual decisions that we make are not going to add up to anything like the kind of scale of change that we need. And I do believe that the fact that for so many people it's so much more comfortable to talk about our own personal consumption, than to talk about systemic change, is a product of neoliberalism, that we have been trained to see ourselves as consumers first. To me that's the benefit of bringing up these historical analogies, like the New Deal or the Marshall Plan – it brings our minds back to a time when we were able to think of change on that scale. Because we've been trained to think very small. It is incredibly significant that Greta Thunberg has turned her life into a living emergency.

Yes, she set sail for the UN climate summit in New York on a zero carbon yacht ...

Exactly. But this isn't about what Greta is doing as an individual. It's about what Greta is broadcasting in the choices that she makes as an activist, and I absolutely respect that. I think it's magnificent. She is using the power that she has to broadcast that this is an emergency, and trying to inspire politicians to treat it as an emergency. I don't think anybody is exempt from scrutinising their own decisions and behaviours but I think it is possible to overemphasise the individual choices. I have made a choice – and this has been true since I wrote No Logo, and I started getting these "what should I buy, where should I shop, what are the ethical clothes?" questions. My answer continues to be that I am not a lifestyle adviser, I am not anyone's shopping guru, and I make these decisions in my own life but I'm under no illusion that these decisions are going to make the difference.

Some people are choosing to go on birth strikes. What do you think about that?

I'm happy these discussions are coming into the public domain as opposed to being furtive issues we're afraid to talk about. It's been very isolating for people. It certainly was for me. One of the reasons I waited as long as I did to try and get pregnant, and I would say this to my partner all the time – what, you want to have a Mad Max water warrior fighting with their friends for food and water? It wasn't until I was part of the climate justice movement and I could see a path forward that I could even imagine having a kid. But I would never tell anybody how to answer this most intimate of questions. As a feminist who knows the brutal history of forced sterilisation and the ways in which women's bodies become battle zones when policymakers decide that they are going to try and control population, I think that the idea that there are regulatory solutions when it comes to whether or not to have kids is catastrophically ahistorical. We need to be struggling with our climate grief together and our climate fears together, through whatever decision we decide to make, but the discussion we need to have is how do we build a world so that those kids can have thriving, zero-carbon lives?

Over the summer, you encouraged people to read Richard Powers's novel, The Overstory. Why?

It's been incredibly important to me and I'm happy that so many people have written to me since. What Powers is writing about trees: that trees live in communities and are in communication, and plan and react together, and we've been completely wrong in the way we conceptualise them. It's the same conversation we're having about whether we are going to solve this as individuals or whether we are going to save the collective organism. It's also rare, in good fiction, to valorise activism, to treat it with real respect, failures and all, to acknowledge the heroism of the people who put their bodies on the line. I thought Powers did that in a really extraordinary way.

What are you views on what Extinction Rebellion has achieved?

One thing they have done so well is break us out of this classic campaign model we have been in for a long time, where you tell someone something scary, you ask them to click on something to do something about it, you skip out the whole phase where we need to grieve together and feel together and process what it is that we just saw. Because what I hear a lot from people is, ok, maybe those people back in the 1930s or 40s could organise neighbourhood by neighbourhood or workplace by workplace but we can't. We believe we've been so downgraded as a species that we are incapable of that. The only thing that is going to change that belief is getting face to face, in community, having experiences, off our screens, with one another on the streets and in nature, and winning some things and feeling that power.

You talk about stamina in the book. How do you keep going? Do you feel hopeful?

I have complicated feelings about the hope question. Not a day goes by that I don't have a moment of sheer panic, raw terror, complete conviction that we are doomed, and then I do pull myself out of it. I'm renewed by this new generation that is so determined, so forceful. I'm inspired by the willingness to engage in electoral politics, because my generation, when we were in our 20s and 30s, there was so much suspicion around getting our hands dirty with electoral politics that we lost a lot of opportunities. What gives me the most hope right now is that we've finally got the vision for what we want instead, or at least the first rough draft of it. This is the first time this has happened in my lifetime. And also, I did decide to have kids. I have a seven year old who is so completely obsessed and in love with the natural world. When I think about him, after we've spent an entire summer talking about the role of salmon in feeding the forests where he was born in British Columbia, and how they are linked to the health of the trees and the soil and the bears and the orcas and this entire magnificent ecosystem, and I think about what it would be like to have to tell him that there are no more salmon, it kills me. So that motivates me. And slays me.

This story was originally published by The Guardian, and is republished here (the EcoWatch link) as part of the Covering Climate Now partnership to strengthen the media's focus on the climate crisis.
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"The size of your dreams must always exceed your current capacity to achieve them. If your dreams don't scare you, they aren't big enough."
--- Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (b. 1938), former president of Liberia

September 18, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Charlottetown Farmers' Market is open, 9AM-2PM

Standing Committee Meetings:
Public Accounts, 9AM, Coles Building, Topic: "The committee will meet to review The Report of the Auditor General to the Legislative Assembly dated March 8, 2019; when that review is complete, the committee will review the Report of the Auditor General - Petro"leum Product Pricing: Prince Edward Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission dated December 21, 2018. Auditor General B. Jane MacAdam will be in attendance." Watch live here. (NOW)

Standing Committee on Health and Social Development, 2PM, Coles Building and on-line. "The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the Prince Edward Island Human Rights Commission from John Rogers, Chair, and Brenda Picard, Q.C., Executive Director. Other presenters to be confirmed." Watch live here

TONIGHT:
Public presentation: Climate Change, Indigenous Rights and Trade Justice, 7PM, Farm Centre, with environmental and Indigenous leader Clayton Thomas-Müller. Free. (Trade Justice PEI has been planning this event and is very happy to have Clayton here in P.E.I.)
Facebook event link
--------------------------------
Climate Crisis "Global Strike Week" (September 20-27th) events/P.E.I. planned so far:

Friday, September 20th:
Fridays for Future – Global Climate Strike, 3:30-4:30PM, at Province House on Grafton street

Note that some businesses will be closed for Friday or part of Friday as a Climate Strike

Saturday, September 21st:
The Doom and Gloom Jubilee, 7-8:30PM, Victoria Row, "an artist-based collective performing a multimedia event."

Friday, September 27th:
Global Climate Strike led by PEIYouth4Climate, 12Noon-2PM, Province House at Grafton Street. Support from everyone needed!
--------------------------------------
Are you a bit confused about the Climate Strike activities going on and how you be supportive? I am, also, but it looks like there is this Friday is a global day for a "strike" to bring awareness to the public (and leaders), and then next Friday the 27th, students leading the events to send their message. Everyone is welcome all events.

Here is a U.S. based-article, focusing on U.S. Global Climate Strike/Student led demonstrations on the 20th, but it offers some suggestions:

How to Support the Global Climate Strike - Lifehacket article by Josh Ocampo

Published on Monday, September 16th, 2019

Last week, 16-year-old activist Greta Thunberg and hundreds of other young activists protested in front of the White House, demanding action on climate change. This Friday, September 20th, they’ll be joined by thousands of other young (and older) protestors across the world to take part in a global Climate Strike. But what exactly is the strike? And how can you support the protests if you’re not able to join in?

What exactly is the Climate Strike?

Inspired by Thunberg’s protest last year, the strike on September 20 aims to bring awareness to the climate crisis in the days preceding the UN’s climate change summit; students have pledged to walk out from schools to “call attention” to the crisis and to make certain demands.

U.S. Youth Climate Strike, made up of eight youth-led groups, is demanding changes from U.N. leaders that include support of the Green New Deal, implementation of sustainable agriculture, and the protection of indigenous lands and waterways. (There isn’t one organization responsible for the strike, but rather, groups all over the world; while their demands may differ, the intent is the same.)

At least 900 Amazon employees at the company’s Seattle headquarters have pledged to walk out, too. And stores like Patagonia, Burton, and Lush have agreed to close their U.S. stores in support. “These Climate Strikes won’t solve the climate crisis alone,” the Global Climate Strike’s website reads.” What this moment can do is demonstrate that people are no longer willing to continue with business as usual.”According to 350, a non-profit dedicated to climate change awareness, at least 450 climate strikes registered across the U.S. so far and 2,500 globally. And New York City public schools are excusing students who are absent from school to strike (with parental consent)

How can I help?

If you want to strike, first, you should understand what it means for you and your job; depending on your occupation, like some state employees, a strike may be considered illegal. As Vice suggests, you might initially suggest to a supervisor to close their doors for the day (or even just a couple of hours) to honor the strike. “Probably this won’t be successful if you work for a large corporation like Chase Bank or Walmart,” Geoff Dembicki writes for Vice. “But small businesses like coffee shops, restaurants, bars, and clothing stores could be receptive. The same goes for medium-size office workplaces.”

Alternatively, use your lunch break to join a local demonstration; you should check out the Strike With Us’ website to find nearby events. Depending on your location, Climate Strike events might be taking place throughout the week, too. And if calling out sick is out of the question, you can donate to organizations like the US Youth Climate Strike (all proceeds will go toward future strikes and initiatives according to their GoFundMe page). And make a public statement of support on social media and help amplify the strike’s message.

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-support-the-global-climate-strike-1838097431

--------------------------------------------------------------
A recent letter to the editor, responding to an opinion piece. Note this was not found on-line on The Guardian's website except in their Press Reader format, so I have no actual link.

LACK OF KNOWLEDGE IS NOT THE ISSUE - The Guardian Letter to the Editor

Published on Friday, September 6th, 2019

This is a response to the opinion piece 'Young people need knowledge to succeed financially' by Logan McLellan in Thursday's Guardian.

With all due respect, Mr. McLellan, I would challenge you on your conclusion that lack of knowledge is impeding financial success.

The annihilation of education grants and bursaries and replacing them with interest-bearing student loans is not a lack of knowledge. Rents and mortgages that account for 50 per cent or more of household income (versus less than 35 per cent in the 1970s) is not a lack of knowledge. Allowing credit cards/lending companies to charge usury interest rates is not a lack of knowledge. A shift from tenured employment with benefits to contract work and self-employment without benefits is not a lack of knowledge.

Never have I chosen not to max out my RRSP contribution or TFSA because of a lack of knowledge, but every time it has been a lack of funds.

Indeed, those I know with little money have vast financial knowledge. Their budgets are squeezed to within an inch of bursting. They can tell you how much money is in the bank, the exact time any deposit or withdrawal takes place, and the best way to stretch a dollar. A lot of time is invested in making day-to-day living manageable, and worrying about the impact of any unexpected emergencies (can I afford an ambulance?) or celebrations (how many birthday party invitations can a kid get in a year?).

I do however, agree with your statement: “It’s time we started treating the decline in personal finances as the urgent problem that it is.”

As you are running for office, I look forward to hearing more concrete ideas than passing the problem off to an education system that is already strained and tasked with the job of educating students for a world that we can’t even imagine.

Personal finances are already taught in high school. I know because I taught it 20 years ago.

Laura K. Bird,
Charlottetown


Or, as this headline from an old piece in the satire magazine The Beaverton:
"Financial planner recommends having more money"
------------------------------
"The ability to forgive oneself....It is the key to making art, and very possibly the key to finding any semblance of happiness in life."
--- Ann Patchett (b. 1963), writer

September 17, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Tuesday, September 17th:
Public Lunch Webinar, "Food System Failure: Why Food is a Forgotten Policy Option", 12-1:30PM
, at Dalhousie University and the webinar link, below.
Four experts will discuss the challenges and opportunities for our 21st century food system
The second panel in the MacEachen Institute's ten-week Policy Matters Speaker Series.
The right to food is enshrined in international law, while ending hunger is explicit as the second of 17 global sustainable development goals. Yet 4 million Canadians experience food insecurity, diet-related chronic diseases are increasing, and climate change is threatening food supply and production as well as traditional ways of life for many communities across Canada. These complex issues point to a failure of the food system but why isn’t anyone talking about this failure in the run up to the Federal election?
In this panel, four speakers will discuss the challenges and opportunities for our 21st century food system, from the perspectives of health, sustainability, economic development, corporate responsibility and law. In doing so, they will address the question, what are the policy levers for a fair, affordable, sustainable and healthy food system for Atlantic Canada?
thanks to Pauline Howard of PEI Food Exchange for sharing this.
Facebook event link

Standing Committee on Education and Economic Growth, 1:30PM, Coles Building, attending in the Gallery or watching on-line. Matters to discuss include the housing crisis, and Grade 3 Assessments. (Doesn't this highlight the dual nature of this Committee?)

Coffee House and Film Night, with BLACT Media/Urban Island, 7-10PM, Learning Centre, CASS Science Hall at UPEI. Sponsored by Trade Justice PEI

Also tonight:
Webinar with Naomi Klein on her hew new book, On Fire: The Green New Deal, 7:30-9PM, link below. "The Leap’s co-founder Naomi Klein is launching her new book, On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal, in New York. She’ll be joined by Varshini Prakash, Executive Director and co-founder of the Sunrise Movement.... On Fire brings together ten years’ worth of Naomi’s writing on the interlinked crises of climate change and inequality — from annual wildfires in the Pacific Northwest to post-hurricane disaster capitalism in Puerto Rico — culminating in an argument for why we need an ambitious Green New Deal, right now. The Event link will take you here to watch the live stream:
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheCooperUnion
------------------------------
Congratulations to District 24 (Evangeline-Miscouche) MLA Sonny Gallant for becoming the interim Leader of the P.E.I. Liberal Party. Previous interim Leader Robert Mitchell announced he was stepping down from the leadership perhaps to explore running for the permanent Leader of the Liberal Party, currently the Third Party in the Legislature. He will be interviewed on CBC Island Morning Radio before 8AM today.
------------------------
Naomi Klein will also be on The Current today after 8:30AM to discuss her book and about the future.
CBC Radio, 96.1FM, after the 8:30AM news.
--------------------------------
"If there is no struggle, there is not progress."
--- Frederick Douglass

September 16, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Short newsletter today. Glad that most people have power back on, but there are still people who missed getting counted. (902) 629-3799 is Maritime Electric's phone line to report outages.

Some events tomorrow:
Tuesday, September 17th:
"Let's Get Cooking" video release party, 10:30-11AM
, Tremploy, 75 Raiders' Road, Charlottetown. from the PEI Association for Community Living: "Please join us as we (and our partners, Tremploy, and Holland College) launch this exciting new cookbook and visual aids designed to help individuals with intellectual disabilities live a more independent life!! Space is limited, so please RSVP to PEIACL." call: (902) 439-4607
Thanks to the PEI Food Exchange for mentioning this.

Standing Committee on Education and Economic Growth, 1:30PM, Coles Building. All welcome in the Gallery or to watch live on the Legislative Assembly website.
"The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the impact of the low housing vacancy rate and short-term rentals on tourism and economic growth by Erin McGrath-Gaudet, Deputy Minister; Kent MacDonald, CEO of Tourism PEI; and Chris Jones, Director of Strategic Initiatives, of the Department of Economic Growth, Tourism & Culture. The committee will also receive a briefing on Grade 3 Assessments from Bethany MacLeod, Deputy Minister; and Tammy Hubley-Little, Director of English Education, Programs and Services, of the Department of Education and Lifelong Learning."
----------------
Also this week:
Building a Just and Sustainable Future, organized by Trade Justice PEI, a coalition of 20 groups and individuals who are concerned about Canada’s current international trade agenda and who believe that it’s time for trade that is more democratic and environmentally sustainable, more supportive of a transition to a carbon neutral economy in which workers receive their fair share of the benefits, and is more respectful of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.
This is similar to what's discussed by The Leap Manifesto...all good ideas and plans which decision-makers need to be aware of to move forward.

Events:
Tuesday, September 17th:
Coffee House, 7-10PM
, UPEI, CASS Science Building,
conversation, music by Blact Media and three short films "...about resistance and the struggle for a just and sustainable future (The Pipe Dreams Project, Frontera Invisible and Saving Rosia Montana) that tell the stories of young activists opposing pipelines in Canada, a Romanian community opposing a mining project that threatens their homes and the environment, and peasant farmers and Indigenous people resisting corporations intent on displacing them to produce palm oil for green fuel."
Facebook event link

Wednesday, September 18th:
Presentation: "Climate Justice, Indigenous Rights and Trade Justice", 7PM
, Farm Centre, with Clayton Thomas-Muller, Climate Justice and Indigenous Rights campaigner and activist.
Facebook event
-----------------
"My grandfather once told me that there were two kinds of people: those who do the work and those who take the credit. He told me to try to be in the first group. There is much less competition."
---Indira Gandhi (1917-1984)

September 15, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Open Farm Day, various times, is going ahead, despite two places not being able to participate due to storm damage.
CBC Story with links

Fourth Festival of Forests, 1-4PM, Macphail Woods
Facebook event link

PUSH-The Film, 2PM , City Cinema. "...a documentary exploring why it has become so expensive to live in our cities, from award-winning documentary filmmaker Fredrik Gertten..... This film event is presented by the group, The Fight for Affordable Housing PEI, a grassroots advocacy group working to address the lack of affordable housing, tenants’ rights and the influx of unregulated short-term rentals in Prince Edward Island. Members of the Fight for Affordable Housing agree, that housing is a right, not a privilege and that it cannot be treated as a commodity to be governed by market forces. All people, in Prince Edward Island as well in communities around the world, deserve safe, affordable and accessible homes."

Fascinating Ladies-- Closing Performance, 2PM, Victoria Playhouse, Victoria-by-the-Sea, tickets. " Fascinating Ladies is a celebration of the great girl groups and famous female artists of the 20th century. Through song, dance and lively banter, the dynamic trio of Catherine O’Brien, Kelley Mooney and Allison Kelly will delight and entertain." I can speak to that the cast as individuals are very, very giving members of various communities and organizations.
-----------------------------------
Book pre-orders:

Mammals of Prince Edward Island and Adjacent Marine Waters


Of course, we are mammals of P.E.I., too, but I think this gorgeous and informative book focuses on the non-human ones.

The all-star biologist/naturalist line-up of writers includes Rosemary Curley, J. Dan McAskill and Pierre-Yves Daoust; and the photography is breathtaking, as in the cover photo by Donna Martin.

The book is published by Island Studies Press, with gratitude to them for investing in this kind of endeavour.

Pre-orders at a discount can be made here at the Nature PEI webpage,
and will be in at the December 2019 Nature PEI meeting (Tuesday, December 3rd)


cover of Mammals of Prince Edward Island and Adjacent Marine Waters
---------------------------------
Back to politics: http://www.peicanada.com/eastern_graphic/article_5decc9b8-d3f1-11e9-9935-4b99379bacf3.html

Spin before shovels in the ground - The Eastern Graphic article by publisher Paul MacNeill

Published on Wednesday, September 11th, 2019, in The Graphic publications
(bolding is mine --CO)

Politics is the art of misdirection. Announcing an action is almost more important than the action itself. And because spin is of primary importance to governments, regardless of stripe, the same promise can be made over and over again with a straight face. Governments know the public and media are quite easy to dupe.

Premier Dennis King made his way to UPEI last week for a photo of him holding an artist’s rendering of a proposed new 260 room residency. The president of UPEI was exuberant and bragged about the important relationship between the government and school. The president of UPEI student union beamed for the camera.

It was “easy for me to get behind a project like this,” the premier told The Guardian.

There is only one problem. Premier King didn’t need to get behind the project. The Government of Prince Edward Island was already behind the $60 million project.

The announcement was, quite literally, old news.

Like November 2018 old news. That’s when the former Liberal government announced the residency as part of its Housing Action Plan. The residence will also serve as part of the athlete’s village for the 2023 Canada Games.

What the new premier needed was a photo of his government making a Liberal announcement a PC project. In the history of democracies, this is not a first. Nor will it be the last. But it is a perfect example of unnecessary political manipulation that delays a needed project.

At some point government needs to stop yapping and start building. Foot dragging will not solve any issue – especially the housing crisis.

Emma Drake was not quoted by The Guardian in her current capacity as student union president, but when the project was first announced last year, UPEI’s student newspaper, The Cadre, did. And as Vice President, Drake added a pointed and important perspective.

“I think 260 units is great, but at the same time it’s very divisive in the sense that the people who are living there can either afford it as they come from higher income backgrounds, or they are in exceptional amounts of debt,” she told the school publication.

While it does not take the shine off, or minimize necessity of the residence, Drake provides much needed context. Neither Premier King nor UPEI President Alaa Abd-El Aziz referenced the affordability issue. Neither said what impact it will have on record student debt because the reality is staying on campus is significantly more expensive than off.
(CO note: with Charlottetown's rental market, I am not sure "significantly" is totally accurate, but it's true on-campus residence is generally more expensive than off-campus.)

It’s a fair question and one that deserves a more thoughtful response than a smiling photo op.

Premier King has promised to govern differently. And in many ways, most notably tone, he has. But in many ways this PC government acts just as Liberal and PC governments before it. Spin is a priority; action too often delayed to appease political or bureaucratic considerations.

He promised bold. We have yet to see it. And as the days grow farther from the last provincial election and closer to the next, it becomes less likely PC actions will match their political rhetoric.

Islanders are ready for bold and decisive leadership, but government often runs far behind public sentiment. And if it happens with the King government it will be a squandered opportunity.

Paul MacNeill is Publisher of Island Press Limited. He can be contacted at
paul@peicanada.com
-------------------------------------

"The only true wisdom is knowing you know nothing."
--- Socrates (470-399 B.C.E.), philosopher

September 14, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

LOTS of Events and Notices:
Farmers' Markets:
Charlottetown -- 9AM-2PM
Summerside -- 9AM-1PM
Murray Harbour Farmers Market, 9AM-noon
George's in Bedeque -- 10AM-2PM
Cardigan Farmers' Market, 10AM-2PM

-----------------
Climate Emergency signs for sale:

Printed lawn and window signs in bright yellow and red that read:
CLIMATE EMERGENCY
ACT NOW!

They are 9''x12''.
The lawn signs are weather-proof and sell for $8 with metal stand,
and the window signs are $2

They are available at:
Fridays for the Future,
Cenotaph, Province House, Charlottetown
*Farmers' Markets in Cardigan and Charlottetown Saturday mornings*
Or call Mike at (902) 569-8688.

Their effectiveness will be determined by the number of them that appear before, during and after the election. We urge people to pass on the word to anyone who might be interested in buying a sign.


-------------------------------------------
Last day to see the fabric arts show "Stories in Stitches IV"
Until 5PM, St. Paul's Church and Hall
Facebook event link
---------------------------------------------
Joe Byrne has been acclaimed the NDP candidate in the Charlottetown Riding for the October Federal election.
The NDP Nomination meeting scheduled for tonight has been postponed and the Campaign Launch date will be announced soon.
-----------------------------------
Keep in mind for tomorrow:
Sunday, September 15th:

Festival of Forests
Facebook event link

Open Farm Day
website

PUSH -- movie on the fight for affordable housing, Facebook event link
----------------------------------------
Tuesday, September 17th:
Coffee House and Film Night: Building a Just and Sustainable Future, 7-10PM
, The Learning Centre in the CASS Science Hall @ UPEI

A coffee house, featuring The Urban Island, presented by BLACT Media, will take place on Tuesday, September 17th at UPEI, between 7 and 10 pm. The event is open to the public, and admission is free (although donations are always welcome).

The event is one of a series of events taking place on the UPEI campus and at the PEI Farm Centre on September 17 and 18. Building a Just and Sustainable Future has been organized by Trade Justice PEI, a coalition of 20 groups and individuals who are concerned about Canada’s current international trade agenda and who believe that it’s time for trade that is more democratic and environmentally sustainable, more supportive of a transition to a carbon neutral economy in which workers receive their fair share of the benefits, and is more respectful of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Also in the line-up for the evening are three short films about resistance and the struggle for a just and sustainable future (The Pipe Dreams Project, Frontera Invisible and Saving Rosia Montana) that tell the stories of young activists opposing pipelines in Canada, a Romanian community opposing a mining project that threatens their homes and the environment, and peasant farmers and Indigenous people resisting corporations intent on displacing them to produce palm oil for green fuel.

About the performers: @TheUrbanIsland is a community group of artists, educators, and media creators, whose goal is to showcase all that is going on within PEI’s Urban Community. Urban Islanders are artists who have received professional training who collaborate with and support one another to act with confidence as independent creators when opportunities arise. Find out more on Instagram @blactmedia and @theurbanisland.

For more information, find Trade Justice PEI on facebook and Instagram @tradejusticepei, or email tradejusticepei@gmail.com.

Wednesday, September 18th:
Public talk by Clayton Thomas-Müller, 7PM,
PEI Farm Centre

Trade Justice PEI is pleased to announce that Clayton Thomas-Müller will be in Charlottetown on Wednesday, September 18 for a public speaking event, starting at 7 pm at the PEI Farm Centre. His talk, "Climate Change, Indigenous Rights and Trade Justice" is open to the public and there is no charge for admission. This is part of “Building a Just a Sustainable Future”, a series of events taking place on September 17th and 18th at UPEI and at the Farm Centre.

Clayton Thomas-Müller is a campaigner for indigenous rights and environmental and economic justice. He is based in Winnipeg, Canada, and is a member of the Mathias Colomb Cree Nation, also known as Pukatawagan, in Northern Manitoba. He is a senior campaign specialist with 350.org, an international movement working to end the age of fossil fuels and build a world of community-led renewable energy for all.

Clayton has been involved in many initiatives to build an inclusive global movement for energy and climate justice. He serves on the board of environmental organisations such as the Bioneers; Black Mesa Water Coalition; Indigenous Climate Action and the Wildfire Project. He has campaigned across Canada and the US supporting indigenous peoples to defend their territories against the encroachment of the fossil fuel industry, with a special focus stopping the expansion of the Canadian tar sands and its associated pipelines.

Trade Justice PEI, the host of the event, is a coalition of 20 groups and individuals who are concerned about Canada’s current international trade agenda and who believe that it’s time for trade that is more democratic and environmentally sustainable, more supportive of a transition to a carbon neutral economy in which workers receive their fair share of the benefits, and more respectful of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

For more information: @tradejusticepei, or tradejusticepei@gmail.com.
---------------------------------------
Tuesday, September 24th:
Climate First Tour -- HALIFAX
, David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis
Website

Wednesday, September 25th: Maude Barlow, CHARLOTTETOWN, 7PM, Rodd's Charlottetown, free.

from MaudeBarlow, Honourary Chairperson of the Council of Canadians:
The facts are undisputable – our world’s freshwater sources are in danger.

Now, more than ever, we need to make a commitment to protect water from pollution, abuse and corporate greed – and that’s where the Blue Communities Project comes in.

Despite the 2017 Water Act, we know PEI continues to experience significant impacts on ground water – the Island’s only source of drinking water. From increased industrial agriculture (with its dependence on high levels of chemical fertilizers and pesticides), major coastal erosion, and the exploitation of loopholes in current water and land protection legislation, there are still many threats to PEI’s water.

I invite you to join me in Charlottetown on September 25 as I discuss Blue Communities, water protection, and my new book, Whose Water is it Anyway? Taking water protection into public hands.

The Blue Communities Project is dedicated to three primary principles: that access to clean, drinkable water is a basic human right, that municipal and community water will be held in public hands, and that single-use plastic water bottles will not be available in public spaces. With its simple, straightforward approach, the Blue Communities movement, led by the Council of Canadians, CUPE and Eau Secours, has been growing around the world for a decade. Today, Paris, Berlin, Bern, and Montreal are just a few of the cities that have made themselves Blue Communities.

In this book I examine the growing threats to our water sources and tell the story of how grassroots water warriors woke up to the immense pressures facing water in a warming world. The way forward includes a step-by-step guide to making your own community “blue.”

Event Details

When: Wednesday, September 25 at 7:00 p.m.
Where: The Georgian Room, Rodd Charlottetown, 75 Kent St, Charlottetown
Facebook Event

Also this evening, please join us to share in a very special celebration as Leo Broderick, former Chairperson and Board Member of the Council of Canadians, receives the prestigious Order of P.E.I. award!

This event is co-hosted by the Charlottetown Chapter of the Council of Canadians. Admission is free.

My book will show you how ordinary people can effect enormous change by coming together with common passion and purpose. There will be copies available for purchase, and I will be happy to sign it for you!

We need a new water ethic that puts water protection and water justice at the heart of all our policies and laws. The path forward to Blue Communities is clear – and necessary.

I hope to see you on September 25 – and please bring a friend!

With hope and resolve,
Maude Barlow

------------------------------
" We need a new water ethic that puts water protection and water justice at the heart of all our policies and laws."
--- Maude Barlow

September 13, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Premier Dennis King is slated to be on CBC Radio's Island Morning (not sure of the time), and the Political Panel is also set to discuss events,  at 7:40AM.

Events:

Today and next Friday:
Fridays for Future, 3:30-4:30PM, Cenotaph by Province House.

Please note that on September 27th, the event will be from Noon-2PM.
 

 



From two caring Mikes, who are doing something (announcements edited slightly for space):
 

Climate Emergency signs for sale:

We are trying to hold politicians to there word that when they declare a climate emergency they need to act on that and not pay lip service.

We have printed lawn and window signs in bright yellow and red that read:

            CLIMATE EMERGENCY

                        ACT NOW!

They are 9''x12''.
The lawn signs are weather-proof and sell for $8 with metal stand,
and the window signs are $2

 

They are available at:
Fridays for the Future, Cenotaph, Province House, Charlottetown
Farmers' Markets in Cardigan and Charlottetown Saturday mornings
Or call Mike at (902) 569-8688.

 

Their effectiveness will be determined by the number of them that appear before, during and after the election. We urge people to pass on the word to anyone who might be interested in buying a sign.   

 



Here they come, three of Canada's most brilliant elders:
David Suzuki, Stephen Lewis and Buffy Ste. Marie on the Climate First Tour.

At this point there is NO stop in P.E.I., and only four on this Tour now (Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal, Halifax).  Also, it does not appear as if Buffy is confirmed for Halifax.  :-/

Halifax is Tuesday, September 24th, at the Rebecca Cohn Auditorium at the Dalhousie Arts Centre. Tickets are $14 for students and $26 for adults.  Anyone interested in ride-sharing to Halifax?

More details and tickets:
https://www.climatefirsttour.ca/halifax


Here is article from CBC Radio's "As It Happens" last night:
 

David Suzuki joins Stephen Lewis, Buffy Sainte-Marie for 'Climate First' tour
 

'This is an issue as if we are at war,' the environmental activist says is his message to young voters

from:

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-thursday-edition-1.5281084/david-suzuki-joins-stephen-lewis-buffy-sainte-marie-for-climate-first-tour-1.5281085
 

Posted by CBC Radio, on Thursday, September 12th, 2019
 

David Suzuki is embarking on a cross-Canada tour with fellow activist and former diplomat Stephen Lewis, and singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie. The trio say their goal is to encourage young people to stop climate change.

They admit that may no longer be achievable in their lifetimes, but they warn the consequences could be dire for the audiences they're hoping to attract — if they don't act.  

Suzuki spoke with As it Happens host Carol Off about why the three are launching the tour at the start of a federal election campaign. Here is part of their conversation.

Between Buffy Sainte-Marie, Stephen Lewis and yourself, it's quite a lineup of stars. But you're all senior citizens, sorry to say. What's your appeal to young people?

I call us the "Silverback Gorillas and the Grizzly Mom." I believe we've earned the right to speak as elders, as seniors. And our commonality with youth is that we no longer have a vested interest in the status quo. We don't have to play games to get a job or a raise or a promotion. We're not interested in money or fame or power. And so we're free now to speak the truth from our hearts.

Young people have everything at stake for the big decisions that have to be made in the coming months. And so we feel as as silverbacks, we want to pass on our life experiences and maybe point out the pitfalls or the strengths of what they're doing.

But if there's any demographic who gets it — who understands the imperatives here, dealing with climate change and the environment — it has to be young people. So aren't you preaching to the converted?

I hope you're right because they certainly have become very active. I think Greta Thunberg from Sweden has had a galvanizing impact on young people. But, you know, their voting record in the past has been very poor. Eighteen- to 22-year-olds coming into the voting age are traditionally not a high participation group.

But our message is: you've got to do more than just get out and vote. That's the most critical thing.

 

You've got to galvanize your peer group. And you've got to demand of everyone running for office — whatever party they're in — you've got to say, "Is climate change your No. 1 issue?" Because this must not remain a partisan issue. This is an issue as if we are at war.

You know, when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and [then-U.S. president  Franklin] Roosevelt declared war then, nobody said, "Aw, this guy is going to break the bank. Our economy is going to go to hell. These damn Democrats don't have the right priorities." Everybody got together.

When the Raptors were playing in the finals, you know, all of Canada — even Montreal, for God's sakes — was rooting for Toronto. We need that kind of spirit.

So how do young people — how do you direct them? And they have very few options in voting.

They are a group that traditionally has not been on the political priority — because quite frankly, when politicians are elected the first concern is re-election. And children don't vote.

And so one call is for young people to galvanize their parents and everybody who cares about them, and where we're going to become eco-warriors to demand before the election that this be put up as a No. 1 issue.

You're absolutely right. Right now, climate is a partisan issue.

If it remains a partisan issue, when we go into another government — doesn't matter which government it is — if climate isn't the No. 1 issue, then it seems to me we're just sacrificing the future of youngsters for political concern.

You mentioned how you have no other interests in this, you've lived well. You're not alone in that, we've all lived well, [those] of our generation. What is it for young people to say, "Well, it's easy for you to say that. I've got student debt, and now you want me this to save the planet." What do you say to them?

You've just sent a spear through my chest. I met three of the girls — well, they were young women — who organized the last big march in Montreal when there were 150,000 people on the streets a few months ago. And when I had the chance to meet them, quite frankly, I broke down and cried.

I cried not out of gratitude, but I cried that these young people who should be developing their life goals and their skills and so on have to be the ones that are driving the demand for action on climate that my generation and the boomers that followed — we have partied like there was no tomorrow. And we didn't think about the repercussions.

So yes, and there's a lot of sense of guilt and sadness on my part. But look, we've just got to get on with it. My carbon footprint has been enormous. To make films, I've done a lot of flying and I regret that. But we've got to get on with the challenge now.

One other area I want to ask you about, because we've been covering it these weeks — the way that environmentalists who are active on this file are being attacked online. These are vulnerable young people who are reading this stuff online. How intimidating— because it's designed to intimidate, right? So how intimidating do you think some of this stuff might be?

I've been run off the road when I was jogging in Haida Gwaii by a trucker who was hauling logs. I've been told not to come to towns, logging towns in British Columbia. And we actually had a bullet fired through our window in Vancouver.

I mean, I'm just thinking on Sunday, I was filming in Montreal. And the crew and I were sitting in a restaurant a guy came up — sidled right up, he wasn't invited. He just sat right down next to me and he said, "I have to tell you, you are nothing but a fraud. Everything you say about climate change is bulls--t."

Now I think he would have done more, but I was sitting with the crew around me. And I finally, and in the finest intellectual terms, I told him to F off.

But had I been alone, it might have been a different kind of confrontation.

So my heart goes out again to the warriors — and as you say, the women become particularly vulnerable and are the major targets for it. It's the kind of time that we have.

The premier of Alberta, one of the first things he did was to set up a war room. And I think we need a war room because I think the battle against climate change is a war.

Interview produced by Kevin Roberston. Q&A edited for length and clarity.
-30-

 

 



Election recap -- What'd I Miss?

 

Election 2019 cheat sheet: the last four years in Canadian politics
 

by Carl Meyer and Fatima Syed
published on Thursday, September 12th, 2019, in
The National Observer
 

Justin Trudeau's first four years as prime minister are officially coming to a close and it remains to be seen whether he and his government have done enough to be re-elected to office for a second shot at governing.

The Canadian political landscape looks vastly different from the promises of sunny ways that brought Trudeau to power. Here is a cheat sheet for the last four years:

Trudeau vs. Trump: every twitch and grunt

Canada’s relationship with the United States was famously described by Justin Trudeau’s father in 1969 as “sleeping with an elephant” — no matter how friendly the beast, one is nevertheless “affected by every twitch and grunt.” Donald Trump has proven to be the twitchiest and the gruntiest.

Trump stunned the world when he swept into office in 2016. From the beginning, Canadians wanted to know if Trudeau could assert himself with this brash real estate developer, a man who had called Mexicans rapists, bragged about grabbing women by the genitals and called for a travel ban on Muslims before getting elected.

Trudeau visited Trump at the White House in early 2017 and the two "affirmed their longstanding commitment to close co-operation" in a statement. But then Trump, who had already called NAFTA “the worst trade deal in history” on the campaign trail, ordered his administration to move forward with renegotiations. The U.S. issued big demands later in 2017, setting up Trudeau to declare he was “pushing back” a few months later, a move that was followed by the U.S. slapping tariffs on metals exports.

By the time Trudeau hosted Trump and other G7 leaders in Quebec in June 2018, the trade dispute was starting to turn nasty. Trump blew up the summit in a tweet after jetting off early, insulting the prime minister from Air Force One as a “dishonest” and “weak” man for the crime of standing up against the tariffs.

Canada made concessions in the new deal, USMCA, on auto imports, signing a provision restricting the country to 2.6 million passenger vehicle exports to the U.S. tariff-free, well above current levels. Canada also opened up a slice of its protected dairy market.

The fate of the deal is still uncertain. Canada's ratification of the deal wasn't passed by Parliament before it was dissolved Wednesday in preparation for the election, meaning the next Canadian government will have to pick up the project.

A wave of Tory blue across Canada

When Trudeau was first elected, an NDP government was in power in the country’s largest oil-producing region in Alberta, while a Liberal government was in charge in Canada’s most populous province, Ontario. Since then, a wave of Tory blue has swept across the country frustrating the prime minister’s attempts to align with the provinces and achieve his political goals.

In 2016, Brian Pallister’s Progressive Conservatives in Manitoba ended almost two decades of NDP government there. In June 2018, Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives were elected in Ontario, setting up the first right-of-centre government in the province since the early 2000s. That was followed by Quebec Premier François Legault’s right-leaning Coalition Avenir Québec winning in October 2018. Also that year, in New Brunswick, Blaine Higgs’ Progressive Conservatives were sworn in after defeating the Liberal government in a non-confidence vote.

This spring, Jason Kenney’s United Conservative Party swept to power in Alberta, while Dennis King’s Progressive Conservatives have come to power in Prince Edward Island. Meanwhile, Pallister has just successfully held on to his Tory government in Manitoba.

Many of the true-blue premiers are fighting Trudeau over a law requiring them his attempt to put a price on pollution, and have created a very different political landscape for the federal election.

The major premier bucking the trend? Premier John Horgan's BC New Democratic Party, which won power from the right-leaning B.C. Liberals in British Columbia in 2017, with the support of the Green Party there. But shared progressive orientation hasn’t prevented rancour: Trudeau and Horgan have clashed over Horgan’s opposition to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

The Trans Mountain pipeline saga

When Justin Trudeau signed off on the Trans Mountain and Line 3 pipelines in 2016, he called it a "major win for Canadian workers, for Canadian families and the Canadian economy, now and into the future." He probably didn't realize how much of a headache it would be for his government and the Liberal Party in the years to come.

Through National Observer’s reporting, the Canadian public now knows that, at least a month before the pipeline was approved, a high-ranking public servant was thinking about how to give cabinet "a legally sound basis to say ‘yes’” to Trans Mountain. This was occurring even as the government said it was consulting with First Nations and hadn't come to a decision. Other public servants told National Observer how stunned they were to be given such direction.

National Observer also uncovered documents showing how the government had caught Kinder Morgan, the pipeline proponent, breaking environmental rules but ignored the penalties as it began construction. A movement in British Columbia started to oppose construction of the pipeline expansion. Behind-the-scenes negotiations began to drive the government towards taking over the project by buying it with billions of dollars in public money.

Soon after, Trudeau faced new headaches as the Federal Court of Appeal quashed the approval of Trans Mountain, even as Kinder Morgan executives were cashing out with millions in stock options and bonuses. The court ruling said Trudeau’s cabinet made its decision without considering all evidence and failing in its legal duty to consult First Nations. It sent the government back to the drawing board.

What followed was a fresh attempt by the Trudeau Liberals to conduct meaningful consultations with First Nations, which led to a second approval by Cabinet this June. But that second attempt is still being questioned, and the pipeline’s fate remains uncertain.

An attempt at reconciliation

It started with a great big promise: “a total renewal of the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples.”

Over the last four years, Trudeau has repeated that no relationship is more important to him than that with Inuit, Métis and First Nations. His government has worked toward restoring self-governance practices and implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s recommendations. It passed Indigenous languages legislation and worked to fix child welfare jurisdictional issues. The national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) also found that centuries of policy and failures amount to "colonial genocide.”

But the Crown’s fundamental relationship with Indigenous peoples continued to bedevil the government. Despite efforts to create a rights and recognition framework, the Liberals failed to deliver on this crucial new pathway toward self-determination.

Some Treaty Nations said they rejected the Indigenous framework because it did not follow Free Prior and Informed Consent, a right recognized in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Still, Trudeau travelled to the North more than any of his predecessors to announce investments in housing, health, infrastructure and conservation. The prime minister also apologized for Canada's removal of sick Inuit from their homes in the 20th century, and exonerated historical figures who were betrayed long ago by the Canadian state, like Cree Chief Poundmaker and six Tsilhqot'in warriors who were invited to peace talks but then arrested and hanged in 1864.

There have also been controversies, the pipeline-consultation failure among them. NDP MP Romeo Saganash in September 2018 asked Trudeau in Question Period why he wouldn’t just “say the truth and tell Indigenous peoples that he does not give a fuck about their rights?” (Trudeau was not in the House at the time.) And a group of First Nations is fighting the Trans Mountain expansion in court. Trudeau and his government are the first to acknowledge that more work needs to be done.

As of Sept. 3, 2019, the government says 87 long- term drinking water advisories have been lifted since the Liberals took office in November 2015; 56 remain. The government promises to lift all of them by March 2021. Other statistics are significant: the MMIWG inquiry showed Indigenous women are 12 times more likely to go missing or be murdered than other women in Canada.

Around 47 per cent of children with First Nations status live in poverty, which is more than two and a half times the national average. And the annual rate of tuberculosis among Inuit is a stunning 290 times higher than the rate among non-Indigenous Canadians, according to a 2018 study by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The Liberal environmental plan

The bold foundation of Trudeau’s plan to reduce Canada’s contribution to the climate crisis — a progressive price on carbon pollution — was implemented on April 1, 2019.

The levy punctuated four years of widespread action items aimed at meeting Canada’s Paris agreement: phasing out coal power, cleaner fuel rules, funding for new green infrastructure like light rail and electric-vehicle charging stations, and other oil and gas sector restrictions. They calculated that this will result in pollution dropping to 592 million tonnes, compared to increasing to 815 million tonnes under Canada’s 2015 projections.

Bill C-69, a major overhaul of the federal environmental-assessment regime, triggered fierce backlash from conservative politicians and the oil and gas sector. Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux delivered a report suggesting Canada would need to impose additional taxes on carbon on top of its current plan to reach its 2030 target, if the carbon tax were the single, solitary tool used to reduce pollution.

This spring, Canadian government scientists published a major report showing how climate change was affecting the country nationwide, from intensifying urban flooding and heat waves to rising sea level on the coasts, threatening freshwater and marine ecosystems and other consequences. The report said Canada is heating up at double the average rate of the planet.

In June the government passed a motion proclaiming climate change a national emergency. But Trudeau could not be in the House for the vote — he was attending the Raptors’ championship parade in Toronto. The next day, the Trans Mountain Pipeline was greenlit.

Jagmeet Singh becomes NDP leader

Jagmeet Singh’s meteoric rise to the top of the New Democrats was described at the time as an unstoppable “juggernaut.” Canada’s first racialized federal political leader and candidate for prime minister, won the NDP leadership race on Oct. 1, 2017, beating out more experienced contenders and igniting a groundswell of excitement.

But Singh soon faced a very Canadian problem: he had no seat in the House of Commons and so could not engage in the daily, TV-worthy cut and thrust that goes on inside that political theatre.

It would take until 2019 before Singh could win a byelection and take his seat in the House. Throughout, he has struggled to shine on the national stage. A recent poll had the NDP falling to fourth place behind the Greens despite the party still controlling the third-most seats. Singh has his work cut out for him.

Trudeau’s private island vacation

"Let me just try to reorder the thoughts," a flustered Trudeau told reporters on Parliament Hill on Dec. 20, 2017.

He was attempting to respond to the findings of the ethics commissioner, who had said Trudeau contravened the Conflict of Interest Act when he vacationed on the Aga Khan's private island while also having “ongoing official dealings” with the spiritual leader.

Trudeau said he had always considered the Aga Khan a family friend, but he promised to clear family vacations in future. The plot thickened when, after the lobbying commissioner found there wasn’t any basis for a complaint, a federal judge ordered that office to take another look. The opposition Conservatives have since called on the RCMP to look into the whole thing.

A trip to India creates controversy

The picture of Justin Trudeau and his family in traditional Indian clothes during a February 2018 trip to the subcontinent is now a key image related to his government’s colourful four-year history — but not in the way the prime minister may have hoped.

First, Trudeau’s family was criticized — and then mocked — for leaning too heavily on “Bollywood-style” clothing during the trip. But the headlines really started coming when it was revealed that Jaspal Atwal, who was convicted of the attempted murder of an Indian cabinet minister in 1986, posed with Trudeau’s wife, Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, at an event in Mumbai.

Atwal was also invited to dine with the prime minister at a second event before that was shut down. Trudeau’s then-national security adviser Daniel Jean took much of the heat that spring for the incident, after suggesting “rogue elements” were behind the shellacking of the PM and warning of “information warfare.” Jean retired soon after, although that was planned before the controversy hit.

Canada's new federal People’s Party

Former federal Conservative cabinet minister Maxime Bernier wanted to be the leader of his party, after his boss, former prime minister Stephen Harper, quit the scene following their defeat in 2015 at the hands of the Liberals.

Bernier lost the leadership vote to Andrew Scheer by a minuscule 1.9 per cent margin. In the ensuing months, he grew disillusioned and finally announced on Aug. 23, 2018, that he was quitting to launch a new party of his own. The Conservatives, he said, had grown “too intellectually and morally corrupt to be reformed.”

The next month he unveiled his new baby: The People’s Party of Canada, described by Bernier as “a coalition of people who are disenchanted with traditional politicians who say one thing one day and the other the next.” The party, he said, was to be an advocate for “smart populism.”

Bernier launched the People’s Party soon after gaining attention on social media for his long denunciation of “ever more diversity” in Canada. He has consistently attacked Canada’s mainstream approach to immigration. He has also rejected mainstream atmospheric science proving global heating and a recent report shows his candidates spreading false information.

Scheer struggles to denounce racism

Scheer has faced blowback on several occasions over the past year for his failure to adequately denounce racism and white supremacy. In February, he appeared at a “convoy” in Ottawa that was officially billed as raising awareness for the oil and gas industry, and opposing Trudeau government environmental policies. But anti-immigrant voices were undeniably part of the scene. Facing criticism for failing to denounce these voices in the crowd, Scheer defended himself by saying he was there to speak to the oil workers.

In March, he was called out again after his initial statement in response to the deadly Christchurch mosque shootings failed to mention Muslims. Then, in June, he faced controversy for his failure to remove Conservative MP Michael Cooper from caucus after Cooper read out the Christchurch shooter’s manifesto in a justice committee hearing, prompting Trudeau to comment that “there is an awful lot of room for intolerance" in Scheer’s Conservative party.

The SNC-Lavalin affair explodes

An ethical grey cloud has been hanging over Parliament Hill since February when The Globe and Mail published a stunning report alleging the Prime Minister’s Office had urged then-attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to help the Quebec engineering and construction giant avoid criminal prosecution.

In the months that followed, Trudeau denied many of the claims, even as his principal secretary and close friend Gerald Butts resigned (only to reappear inside Liberal headquarters in time for the campaign). Meanwhile, Wilson-Raybould quit cabinet soon after the story broke, before giving explosive testimony to committee about the whole affair. She was eventually kicked out of the party and is now defending her Vancouver—Granville seat as an independent.

Trusted cabinet minister Jane Philpott also resigned over the matter and is also running as an independent in Markham—Stouffville.

Trudeau continues to admit to no wrongdoing other than a misread of the situation, saying he did it to save Canadian jobs, despite the fact that the federal ethics commissioner found Trudeau’s actions amounted to his second violation of the Conflict of Interest Act.

And right before the election campaign officially kicked off on Sept. 11, The Globe and Mail published another bombshell: that the government's refusal to release further cabinet secrets may have “stymied” the RCMP from fully examining the SNC-Lavalin case for possible obstruction of justice.

Trudeau and the Liberal Party are entering the election period with some wins and a lot of baggage, but the road isn’t easy for the remaining parties, either. Canadians politics has shifted on its axis these four years and some Canadian voters have become more distrustful of their governments and their actions.

All four major parties have an uphill battle in winning votes — perhaps none more so than the Trudeau Liberals who are set to redefine themselves from their once sunny ways.

  -30-


"Live the life of the full mind, exhilarated by the new ideas, intoxicated by the Romance of the unusual,"  
      --- Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)

September 12, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Until Saturday, September 14th:
Stories in Stitches IV, 10AM-5PM (until 7PM on Friday), St. Paul's Church and Hall, Church Street and Prince Street, $5 admission.
"Eastern Canada’s most dramatic exhibition of quilts, hooked rug and needlecraft creations — hundreds of them, plus artisan demonstrations.... At beautiful St. Paul’s church and hall, corner of Grafton and Prince Streets, Charlottetown … Look for the car parked on the lawn — covered in a tailor-made quilt!"
Facebook event link

Thursday Afternoon Farm Centre Pop-up Market, 3-6PM, front lawn of Farm Centre, 420 University Avenue. Farmers, artisans, and food producers have quite an assortment of foods and related products for sale.

Darcie Lanthier MP Charlottetown Launch, 6-8PM, Farm Centre, free and all welcome.  Speeches by GPPEI Leader Peter Bevan Baker and Darcie Lanthier will top off an evening of music, munchies, refreshments and commitment auction....Music will be provided by Rowan Gallant and Jesse Périard, vegetarian delights provided by My Plum, My Duck, and there will be a variety of 'saved from the hurricane' tomato products for sale by our good friends at Heart Beet Organics."
And Darcie's last name is pronounced "LAUNCH-chay", not just tonight at her Launch....
Facebook event link

Later, many are planning on watching the first Federal Party Leaders' Debate at Bar1911 about 9PM.

P.E.I.'s Groove Company at Baba's lounge, 8-10:30PM.
Facebook event details


Some upcoming events:
Saturday, September 14th:
Charlottetown NDP federal Candidate Nomination Meeting, 6:30-8PM, Murphy's Community Centre.  All welcome.
Facebook event link

Sunday, September 15th: More than something for everyone:  
Open Farm Day, 1-5PM, various locations.  Visit Island Farms with a wide range of types of operations.
Open Farm Day website

Fourth Annual Festival of Forests, 1-4PM, Macphail Wods Ecological Centre, Orwell. "Our Fourth Annual Festival of Forests will be a family-friendly event, with children’s activities, guided walks, food and micro-workshops. This will be a great opportunity to explore the wonders of the Acadian Forest."
Facebook event link

Screening of PUSH -- The Film, 2-4PM, City Cinema.  "PUSH-- The Film is a documentary exploring why it has become so expensive to live in our cities, from award-winning documentary filmmaker Fredrik Gertten."
Facebook event link

Friday, September 20th:
Climate Strike Activities this week, to be announced later


Sunday, September 22nd:
Dr. John Todd, 7PM, Duffy Hall, UPEI, hosted by The Institute for Bioregional Studies Ltd. and UPEI Environmental Studies. A..."... stimulating book launch that is sure to arouse discussion and a vision of hope on how PEI can become a sustainable region.
John Todd is a biologist working in the field of ecological design. He addresses problems of food production and wastewater processing by using ecosystems technologies that incorporate plants, animals and bacteria. He combines alternative technologies for renewable energy, organic farming, aquaculture, hydroponics and architecture to create 'living machines' or 'eco-machines'; designed for sustainable living." <snip>
More info:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFXMH5ZbNK8

 



Opinion piece:

RUSSELL WANGERSKY: Now you see it, now you don’t

published on Friday, September 6th, 2019 in The Guardian

https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/russell-wangersky-now-you-see-it-now-you-dont-348837/

This isn’t a column about the simple foolishness of United States President Donald Trump apparently doctoring a forecast map to bolster his claim that Alabama was among the U.S. states threatened by hurricane Dorian. (Trump had said the state was threatened — the U.S. weather service hurriedly said that had never been the case. Trump then produced a strangely altered map of the hurricane’s projected path to defend his own comments, with a circle drawn to include Alabama that looked as though it had been added with a Sharpie.)

But that is where this column started, in a way.

One of the things that has been abundantly clear in western politics in recent years is that the truth doesn’t matter anymore. In the past, getting caught in an outright lie could be a career-changer — now, at least as far as your supporters go, even an obvious lie is instantly forgiven.

But if politicians discover they can lie with impunity, what’s to stop them from stealing?

I don’t mean stealing money — I mean stealing information.

I used to have a massive library of government documents — budgets, reports by commissions of inquiry, annual reports from Crown agencies, and the list goes on. They were, by and large, stored in my unique gravitational filing system: the most-used documents, like the provincial estimates for the current and past year, usually worked their way to the top.

But, through successive office moves and the easy online availability of most documents, my piles of paper got winnowed down. Why waste time stirring up clouds of paper dust when the internet can do it for you? Why carry books around, when your iPad has it all right there, and is so much lighter?

But there’s a downside to that — and that’s keeping all the data eggs in the same basket, often conveniently under government control on government servers.

Think of it this way: all the books may still be in the big library, but without the catalogue, good luck finding them in the stacks. You don’t need to burn the books if you burn the catalogue.

And it wouldn’t even have to be obviously deliberate; just change the weblink and move it out of sight, especially on a website that’s packed with information.  That way, if someone comes looking, you can always just say “Oops, we made a mistake” and pop it back up again.

There are already documents that are effectively kept from the public, simply by putting them on the equivalent of the internet’s back shelf.

I regularly find reports on everything from car insurance to regulation of the electric grid to damning financial details about megaprojects hidden in plain sight; significant reports are completed, but there’s no announcement of their release. It’s easy to miss the new ones, unless you devote significant daily time to churning through the lists.

I’ve also experienced occasions where government documents I remember reading suddenly vanished when I needed to find them again: I’ve heard the excuse “Oh, we moved that — here it is…” when I’ve asked for them.

There have already been examples south of the border of information being stripped from government websites. In April 2017, on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s website, webpages that linked climate change to human activity vanished for an “update.” Years later, those pages are still gone, as is the temporary page announcing the update.

And yes, there are sites that capture and keep copies of information posted on the web. But they are an imperfect solution — they don’t capture everything.

Right now, the concept may seem incredible.

But if a politician can do something as bold and stupid as taking a Sharpie to a weather map, you can only imagine what they might get away with on the web.

Beware the boldness of revisionists.

-30-
 




Hiding in plain sight, the weekly record of Cabinet decisions, called "Orders in Council".  The most recent edition was listed on the third page of listings, after having to search for the listing,  and not publishing the newest first or anything logical or clear.....

from:

https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/sites/default/files/publications/20190903truwww.pdf

UNIVERSITY ACT UNIVERSITY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND APPROVAL TO INCUR A LIABILITY Pursuant to clause 17(1)(b) of the University Act R.S.P.E.I. 1988, Cap. U-4, Council authorized the Board of Governors of the University of Prince Edward Island to incur a liability and to make expenditures by borrowing an amount not to exceed sixty million ($60,000,000.00) dollars for the construction of a new student residence.
<snip>

(tomorrow -- publisher Paul MacNeill's take on al this)

 



"All our dreams can come true -- if we have the courage to pursue them."   --- Walter Elias (Walt) Disney (1901-1966)

September 11, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
This morning:

Public Accounts Standing Committee, 9AM-12noon,

CHANGE OF VENUE: Due to technical difficulties following the recent power outage, this meeting will take place in the Committee Room on the first floor of the J Angus MacLean Building. Live streaming will not be available but audio and transcript will be posted to our website following the meeting. We apologize for any inconvenience.
The committee will meet to review The Report of the Auditor General to the Legislative Assembly dated March 8, 2019; when that review is complete, the committee will review the Report of the Auditor General: Petroleum Product Pricing: Prince Edward Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission dated December 21, 2018.
Auditor General B. Jane MacAdam will be in attendance."
This committee meets weekly.


Charlottetown Farmers' Market, 9AM-2PM, Belvedere Avenue.  Fresh produce, crafts, prepared foods, hot tea and coffee.
An item of note from Marion White:  Market baskets from Bolgatanga, Ghana for sale at Charlottetown Farmer's Market starting at $40. 
These are beautiful and functional.

11AM:  Announcement of Writ being dropped to start the Federal Election Campaign.  Election Day is legislated to be Monday, October 21st.

Corn Boil hosted by Charlottetown MP Sean Casey, 5-7PM, Hillsborough Community Centre, 199 Patterson Drive.

"Join MP Sean Casey for a free corn boil!
There will be lots of delicious corn, entertainment, and ADL ice cream. This is a family-friendly event! All are welcome.
"


Stand Against Hate (counter-demonstration to the rally organized by the "National Citizens Alliance of Canada"), 7PM, Kings Square.

from the event link, below: "The National Citizens Alliance (NCA) will be holding an information session at King's Square on September 11. This federal party led by Stephen Garvey have associated themselves with the anti-Muslim Worldwide Coaltion Against Islam, a neo-Nazi tied organization which refers to Muslims as vermin and sewage.
They're currently trying to make inroads into Nova Scotia and currently have people running in ridings in Saskatchewan, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Ontario, and Alberta.
This level of hatred is a growing concern and needs to be confronted. Please share this event and let's show solidarity on the 11th to show that these politics don't belong in a just and caring society."

Facebook event link


Tomorrow, Thursday, September 12th:

Campaign Launch with Darcie Lanthier, Green Party of Canada Charlottetown Candidate, 6-8PM, Farm Centre and Legacy Garden, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.

"Join Darcie Lanthier, Green Party Candidate for Charlottetown, and her supporters in celebration of the official launch of her campaign... for an evening of music, munchies, refreshments and commitment auction....This event is free and for all ages."
 

 


Article: 

 

Greta Thunberg on Climate: “If We Can Save the Banks, We Can Save the World”

by Jake Johnson, Common Dreams
published on Tuesday, September 11th, 2019 at:


https://truthout.org/articles/greta-thunberg-on-climate-if-we-can-save-the-banks-we-can-save-the-world/

During an event in New York City Monday night with author and environmentalist Naomi Klein, 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg had a simple message for those who claim it is “too expensive” to boldly confront the climate crisis with sweeping policies like a Green New Deal.

“If we can save the banks,” said Thunberg, “we can save the world.” “If there is something we are not lacking in this world, it’s money,” she added. “Of course, many people do lack money, but governments and these people in power, they do not lack money. And also we need to have the polluters… actually pay for the damage they have caused. So, to that argument, I would not even respond to that argument, because it has been said so many times, the money is there. What we lack now is political will and social will to do it.”

 

Thunberg arrived in New York late last month after nearly two weeks of sailing across the Atlantic. The young environmentalist made the journey ahead of the Sept. 20 global climate strikes, which she helped inspire through persistent activism that has included directly confronting world leaders and elites over their role in the planetary emergency.

The strikes, which are expected to bring millions to the streets in over 150 countries, will coincide with the United Nations Summit on Climate Change on Sept. 23rd in New York.

“I want September 20 to be a tipping point,” Thunberg said Monday night. “I want world leaders to feel like they have too many people watching them.”

-30-



"If you wish to heal your sadness or anger, seek to heal the sadness or anger of others."  
      ---Ana Castillo (b. 1953), Chicana poet and essayist

September 10, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Thanks to crews from Maritime Electric, my part of Bonshaw has its power back now, but I do sympathize for those still affected, especially those who don't have power or internet or cell service and yet are supposed to look up services on social media or at a government website....

Events today:

From Tony Reddin of Bonshaw, community organizer and environmental activist:

"Hope everybody's ok after the storm here in the Maritimes! Today's my birthday so I'm going to celebrate by going for a hike after lunch here in the beautiful Bonshaw Hills- who'd like to join me?"

Happy Birthday, Tony!

 

Education and Economic Growth Standing Committee Meeting,1:30-3:30PM, J. Angus MacLean Building, corner of Great George and Richmond Streets.

from the notice for the meeting:

CHANGE OF VENUE: Due to technical difficulties following the recent power outage, this meeting will take place in the Committee Room on the first floor of the J Angus MacLean Building. Live streaming will not be available but audio and transcript will be posted to our website following the meeting. We apologize for any inconvenience.

The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the impact of the low housing vacancy rate and short-term rentals on post-secondary students, by Emma Drake, President, and Sweta Daboo, VP Academic and External, UPEI Student Union. Other witnesses to be confirmed.


District 17 MLA (Peter Bevan-Baker) Corn Boil, 5-7PM, Riverdale Cider, 582 Riverdale Road (right turn from TCH across from entrance to Strathgartney Provincial Park, Riverdale

"Join your MLA for District 17 for a free family corn boil. There will be apple themed snacks, corn, music and fun!"

 



Notice: 
Youth Circle (ages 18-30) to discuss housing and climate change, being formed

CPAC (Canadian Public Affairs Channel/Parliamentary Channel) will be producing a report on PEI once the federal election is called sometime in the next 2 weeks. As part of the report, they would like to include a Youth Circle of 3-4 youths age 18-30 discussing the issues of affordable housing and climate change. If you are interested in participating, please contact Bill Kendrick (billkendrick@island-images.ca) or 902-439-2711 for more information.

 


News from The Guardian's website:

Robert Mitchell steps down as interim Liberal leader, considers options


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/mitchell-steps-down-as-interim-liberal-leader-considers-options-350428/

Robert Mitchell has stepped down as interim leader of the P.E.I. Liberal party. Mitchell made the announcement on his Facebook account Monday night. Mitchell said he has informed the P.E.I. Liberal caucus and executive of his intention to step down. “The past few months have been a tremendous experience and I have genuinely valued the support and encouragement of Islanders,’’ Mitchell said. “As a result of that positive feedback, I am considering the permanent leadership as an option.’’

Given the possibility that he may seek the permanent leadership, the District 10 Charlottetown-Winsloe MLA believes it is appropriate and responsible to step away from the interim position.“The interim party and House positions require full attention – and appears incompatible with a potential bid for permanent leadership.’’  Mitchell added that he also recognizes that the current reality of a minority government, saying “our party must be ready to contest an election at any time’’.

“I believe the Liberal party is now in the process of a healthy rebuilding exercise and I look forward to making further contributions to our Island’s future.’’

-30-

 

Independent Child and Youth Advocate Office Public Consultations

Edited from a government press release:

Background:
In July, a draft of the Child and Youth Advocate Act was prepared with intent to establish the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate as independent from government and reporting to the legislative assembly. All three party leaders and house leaders were then briefed on the draft legislation and all three committed support to moving the process forward to public consultation before government introduces the act in the fall sitting of the legislature.

The office will be mandated with promoting and protecting the rights and views of Island children and youth.  Consultations with public and private sector professionals, organizations and community groups serving children, youth and families have been ongoing since mid-August.

Public consultation sessions being held across the province or online through the province’s website.

A decision will be made today on whether consultations scheduled for this evening in Summerside and tomorrow evening in Charlottetown go ahead. Visit www.princeedwardisland.ca/voiceforchildren for the latest updates.

ALL 6-8PM

Today, Tuesday, September 10th:
SUMMERSIDE: Athena School

(open to all residents with simultaneous translation in French),

Wednesday, September 11th:
CHARLOTTETOWN: Birchwood school

Monday, September 23rd:
MONTAGUE: Montague High School

Tuesday, September 24th:
SOURIS: Souris High School

One public meeting originally scheduled for Monday at Hernewood Intermediate School in O’Leary will be rescheduled for a later date.

 


"There is no shame in not knowing. The shame lies in not finding out." 
        ---Assyrian proverb

September 9, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews


September 8, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews


September 7, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

If you don't get a Citizens' Alliance News in the next few days, it may be due to power outages in ruburban Bonshaw; we hope everyone stays safe and looks out for each other.

Events:
Farmers' Markets, all but Cardigan, which being in King's County, is being more affected by Hurricane Dorian.

Charlottetown -- 9AM-2PM
Summerside -- 9AM-1PM
Murray Harbour Farmers Market, 9AM-noon

George's in Bedeque -- 10AM-2PM

 

-----------------
Other events will be updated as to what's going ahead or being postponed when organizers make decisions. 

 


 

Why social media can play a positive role in environmental action

by Taylor Logan
published on CBC On-Line "What on Earth/" series, September 7th, 2019

Many people believe that social media is a waste of time, an exercise in narcissism. But it can also inspire you in surprising ways.
 
It was March 2019 when 
#TrashTag popped up on my social media feed. The hashtag was a call to action for people to clean up garbage-strewn areas around them, and linked to the accounts of millions of folks around the world tidying local beaches, parks and ditches on the side of highways.

Instagram, Twitter and Facebook were blowing up with the hashtag, and I wanted to be a part of it. So I grabbed my roommate Alex, along with our friend Emanuel, and we went out to do our part to help save the world. Six very cold hours later, we had covered an area of nearly three hectares at Burlington Beach, west of Toronto, and collected three large bags of trash.
 
Here's what else happened: Throughout the day, strangers came up and asked us what we were doing. When we answered, many said it was something they were interested in doing, too. A few children saw us and copied our behaviour.
 
We posted pictures online, tagged them with #TrashTag and even made a video out of our little adventure. People commented and messaged me, saying they were inspired to clean up, too. Soon, pictures trickled into my Facebook feed, showing that my friends and family had stayed true to their word: They had completed the challenge as well.

It made me realize that internet activism can actually spark awareness — and action. And #TrashTag is still 
going strong. In the last week, it has reached over 800,000 people on Twitter alone.

Pamela Rutledge, director of the Media Psychology Research Center in California, has 
written that “social media changes public awareness. Because information circulates so freely and quickly, it creates a new baseline for change.”

And she has noted that social media has given environmental issues “an urgency much more potent than getting highlights in the evening news.”
 
One of the best examples of this is young Swedish eco-activist Greta Thunberg, whose weekly climate strikes in Stockholm went viral on social media. Now, she's a global inspiration, addressing European parliaments, chastising CEOs at the World Economic Forum and even garnering a Nobel Peace Prize nomination.

Another example of online activism at work is the banning of plastic straws. This, too, picked up speed on social media. In response to a 2017 
report by International Coastal Cleanup that found straws were one of the top 10 items collected on coastlines globally, a hashtag was born: #StopSucking. Within its first four months, the hashtag had been used more than 304 million times.

The result? Companies and governments have taken heed. 
Starbucks and McDonald’s have begun phasing them out. Alaska Airlines will be cutting plastic straws from their flights. Canada announced a plan to ban single-use plastics, like straws, by 2021. 
 
So the next time you’re feeling hopeless about the environment, look at your social media feed — you might find a little inspiration.

 Taylor Logan

Citizens' Alliance of P.E.I. Facebook page (group)



"Tension is who you think you should be.  Relaxation is who you are." 
   --- Chinese proverb

September 6, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events today:
Standing Committee meeting:

Standing Committee on Rules, Regulations, Private Bills and Privileges, 10AM, Coles Building.This Committee is "charged with the rules and standing orders of the Legislative Assembly, scrutiny of regulations, private bills, and the privileges of individual members and the Legislative Assembly as a whole."  Chair is Official Opposition MLA Hannah Bell, and members are Official Opposition Lynne Lund, Third Party members Sonny Gallant and Gordie McNeilly, and Government members Matt MacKay and Sidney MacEwen.  The topic for today's meeting is "to consider its priorities and communications plan." People can attend in person or watch on-line here.

 

Dogs and Democracy, 11AM-12:30PM, UPEI Campus, W.A. Murphy Centre, free and all welcome. Sponsored by the UPEI Student Union (UPEISU). "Dogs and democracy are our 2 favourite things here at the UPEISU and we're combining them for a fun event...Come pet some therapy dogs...and vote for your favourite dog breed in a vote simulation...The ballot box will be very similar to that used by Elections Canada for Federal Elections, so come get acquainted with it before the election in October."

Regarding events this weekend, some have already been rescheduled and others will likely be, so please check before starting out.
 e.g., District 17 MLA and Official Opposition Leader Peter Bevan-Baker's Corn Boil is now on Tuesday, September 10th, 5-7PM.  Malpeque Green Candidate Anna Keenan is moving her Piatta fundraiser to later in the week.


Sunday, September 8th:
PUSH! -  the Film, 2PM, City Cinema.
 "PUSH - The Film is a documentary exploring why it has become so expensive to live in our cities, from award-winning documentary filmmaker Fredrik Gertten.

Housing prices are skyrocketing in cities around the world. Incomes aren’t keeping up. Families are pushed out of their homes and not even nurses, policemen or firefighters can afford to live in the cities they are supposed to protect. Meanwhile, new buildings are left vacant, used as a place to house money instead of people.
Leilani Farha is the UN Special Rapporteur on Housing. It’s her job to challenge governments to secure a fundamental human right - housing for all. She’s traveling the globe, trying to understand who’s being pushed out of the city and why. She meets politicians, experts and the people directly affected by the growing housing crisis.
From Barcelona to Toronto, PUSH sheds light on our increasingly unlivable cities, a new kind of faceless landlord and a crisis that’s about to affect us all.-----
This film event is presented by the group, The Fight for Affordable Housing PEI, a grassroots advocacy group working to address the lack of affordable housing, tenants’ rights and the influx of unregulated short-term rentals in Prince Edward Island. Members of the Fight for Affordable Housing agree, that housing is a right, not a privilege and that it cannot be treated as a commodity to be governed by market forces. All people, in Prince Edward Island as well in communities around the world, deserve safe, affordable and accessible homes.
This screening is being presented with the support of the United Way of PEI
No reserved seating available. Everyone welcome!

Facebook event link
 


Notes:

Copied from a proud Charlottetown resident:

"I get my food from the Farmers' Market Coop, I bank at the Credit Union, I am insured by the Cooperators.
Check out this message from the Co-operators:"

Be prepared for the effects of Hurricane Dorian
(adapted)

Hurricane Dorian has the potential to bring high winds, heavy rain and storm surge to Atlantic Canada this weekend. We encourage you to take care of what matters most and follow the necessary precautions to avoid injury and minimize property damage.

If your property has been damaged, or if you have been ordered to evacuate, contact (your insurance company) as soon as possible.

Please take the following precautions

  • Monitor traditional and social media for possible emergency messages, and maximize your safety by following the advice of local authorities.
  • Become familiar with the steps to take in case of a power outage.
  • Prepare emergency supply kits for your home and car.
  • Move your important possessions to a higher level to protect them from flood damage.
  • Check the drainage system (storm sewer) on your street. If it is blocked, report the condition to the authorities or try to clear the area around the sewer entrance. If you live in a rural area, check culverts and other waterways and remove any blockages if it is safe to do so.
  • Make sure your backwater valves/sump pumps are working properly.
  • Clear eavestroughs and gutters of debris.
  • Remove or secure outdoor items such as lawn furniture that could become wind-borne.
  • If you own a watercraft, be sure it is out of water and secured in a building.

After the storm subsides

  • Be careful when entering any structure that has been damaged. If the structural integrity of a building is in question, do not enter it.
  • Wear steel-toe footwear with a sole plate in any areas where heavy objects may fall or where you may step on nails or broken glass. Other protective clothing such as pants, long sleeves, gloves and hard hats are also recommended.
  • Beware of damaged power lines, gas lines or electrical systems, which present risks of electrocution, explosion and fire. In your home, if you notice electrical problems, shut off the system at the main circuit breaker; if you smell gas, turn off the main gas valve, open the windows and leave the house immediately. Report electrical and gas hazards to the authorities.
  • Document any damage you may have to your belongings by taking a photo or video prior to discarding.


Making a claim -- check your documentation for contact information

  -30-


It's been a touchy and tough week with a lot of accusations thrown around between some political parties-- and who is benefitting from these stories, from these distractions?  (Not the rest of us trying to fight the climate crisis and wanting to promote electoral reform.)

And Maxime Bernier mocking the personal traits of 16 year old climate activist Greta Thunburg.  That's pretty shameful.

We can insist on better from our elected officials.  And we'll be voting federally in just over a month.

-----------------

This is totally not the Citizens' Alliance of P.E.I.   We formed in late 2012 after the Plan B highway episode, for Islanders and others, with the idea of being a public voice for positive change, focusing on environmental and democratic rights.  And, besides, apostrophes matter.  :-)

National Citizens Alliance to hold rally in Charlottetown, P.E.I.

by Dave Stewart
published on Thursday, September 5th, 2019, in 
The Guardian


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/national-citizens-alliance-to-hold-rally-in-charlottetown-pei-348854/

Police will be keeping an eye on Kings Square Sept. 11

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. —

A minor federal political party whose founder got into a confrontation with federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh’s brother recently will hold a political rally in Charlottetown on Sept. 11.

The National Citizens Alliance will hold its event at Kings Square, off Kent Street, at 7 p.m.  In a video posted to Twitter on Sunday, a protester later identified as National Citizens Alliance founder Stephen Garvey confronts Gurratan Singh, an Ontario MPP, at MuslimFest in Mississauga, Ont., and asks if he supports Shariah law and “political Islam’’.

The Ontario MPP responds, “We don’t need that kind of racism in Canada.’’ Jagmeet Singh said Garvey’s comments amount to Islamophobia.

Charlottetown Police Chief Paul Smith said his department is aware of the party’s concerns with regards to immigration. “We’re aware of it and we’ll be keeping an eye on it,’’ Smith said Tuesday during council’s protective and emergency services committee meeting. “We’ll monitor what’s going on.’’

The party was formed in 2014 and registered with Elections Canada in 2015 under the name Democratic Advancement Party of Canada. Among the party platforms, the alliance calls for an implementation of a flat tax system and an end to carbon pricing as well as a moratorium on accepting immigration applications and to reduce immigration levels to 50,000 per year.

-30-
 


"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."  
    --- Cormac McCarthy (b. 1933)

September 5, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Today, Thursday, September 5th:
Special Committee on Poverty on PEI meeting, 1:30PM, Coles Building (Legislative Chamber). This new committee will elect a chair and "consider its work plan".

Members include:
Government members Ernie Hudson (Minister of Social Development and Housing) and Sidney MacEwen,
Trish Altass and Hannah Bell from the Official Opposition Green Party, and Sonny Gallant and Gordie McNeilly from the Third Party Liberals.
You can go in person, watch on the Legislative Assembly website or probably this Facebook event link

Meet and Greet with (Malpeque MP Green Party Candidate) Anna Keenan, 6:30-8:30PM, The Eagle Nest in North Rustico

"It's always great to see the community getting out, and I would love to have the opportunity to chat with you, to see how we can make Malpeque an even better place to live. It's time for some big ideas, and a shakeup of politics-as-usual, so let's start talking about it. Non-alcoholic refreshments and some snacks will be provided. Andrew runs a great kitchen if you want to buy a fuller meal - I recommend the chowder. :)
Facebook event link

Documentary on CBC-TV, "Disruptor, Conductor", 9PM,CBC-TV, on Nova Scotia Symphony conductor Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser
Danilel Bartholomew-Poyser "wants to use his musical power for good. In Disruptor, Conductor we see him on a mission to break down institutional walls and bring live orchestral music to young people, the LGBTQ community, people on the autism spectrum and prison populations — anyone who might not have had access to it or who may have felt unwelcome in traditional spaces."
More at the link:
https://www.cbc.ca/cbcdocspov/episodes/disruptor-conductor?
---------------------------
Tomorrow, Friday, September 6th:
Standing Committee on Rules, Regulations, Private Bills and Privileges, 10AM, Coles Building. the committee will meet to "consider its priorities and communications plan."
----------------------------
From this week's Graphic newspapers, a opinion piece from the Vision PEI people, with a forewarning of troubling disclosures (the sheer time length of such "government" would perhaps explain things like the insistence on going ahead with the Plan B highway, among other government "initiatives". There needs to be more disclosed, certainly. http://www.peicanada.com/eastern_graphic/article_69c3cfa2-cdc5-11e9-b8ca-dba2187374fb.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share&fbclid=IwAR3uhlWb4eR5HdEx77cdb4X3hzy4tLsF3Vo4KmD3Vacs94iTfYN657PXgF8

Shadow Government?  - The Graphic publications Opinion Piece by Vision PEI

Published on Wednesday, September 4th, 2019 in The Graphic publications
OPINION PIECE LINK

We have some solid information that will shock some Islanders. Be assured we do not wish to be alarmist, however, if true, this information calls into question the very operation of our government, and helps explain the cynicism many share about the democratic process.

Those unfamiliar with the inner workings of government assume the premier and his cabinet ministers run the departments and make the day-to-day decisions, but that is not the whole story. Consider that the elected ministers often have no knowledge or experience whatsoever in the particular mandate of their department. How could they possibly come in - essentially off the street - knowing enough about health care, education, the environment etc to make crucial decisions.

Much, of course, depends on the individual ministers - their level of intelligence, life experiences, determination and self-confidence. But, for the most part, it is the deputy ministers, ADMs and political advisers that run the show, and the lobbyists who are in their ear every day. The ministers and the premier are often just the front people and spokespersons.

None of our current minority government members, including Premier King, have experience in actual governance. None. That said, many of us believe most all of them are good people. They ran on an ethical, progressive platform. They were/are sincere in wanting to help PEI. So far, their egos are not out of control. But something odd is afoot. There is silence from our government on a number of important issues. Many campaign promises are so far unfulfilled. There is no sign of the promised openness and accessibility. Many access to information requests are being ignored by bureaucrats contrary to the law. Announcements from the premier and cabinet are essentially inane; “We’re not happy if there is a loophole in the LPA”. That’s it? An issue this vital and that’s all you have to say? How can that be?

Now comes the shock Islanders. We have been informed by multiple reliable inside sources that cabinet ministers and even Premier King himself are being directed by bureaucrats and political advisers ... a veritable shadow government. We have reason to believe this hidden power (perhaps because of the minority situation) is much bolder than previously. Ministers are kept in the dark and denied information from their own departments. Imagine.

We are informed by insiders that the agenda proposed by the King government in the election campaign is not acceptable to those behind the scenes. They have different priorities. Priorities that benefit certain special interests and individuals. Millions of dollars are at stake, however, they may have overplayed their hand by assuming the elected officials would not speak out. In a word, they underestimated their integrity by assuming a universal desire to keep their positions would ensure silence.

These figures behind the scenes, many of whom came to prominence during the Ghiz regime, have forgotten that our elected officials DO have the final word. Our representatives were elected by the people of PEI to look after our interests. Who will Islanders support when all this corruption is exposed? We will support those we elected, so long as they speak out now about the situation they have encountered. If they don’t they run the very real risk of becoming the agents, not of the people, but of established special interests.

We’ve all had enough of the shady manipulators. There may well be a rebellion on the horizon ... soon. We hope Premier King leads it.

David Weale
Dale Small
Wayne Carver
Chris Wall
John E. Clow
Vision PEI

------------------------------
"I'm not afraid of storms, for I'm learning how to sail my ship."
--- Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888)

September 4, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events today:
Charlottetown Farmers' Market, 9AM-2PM, Belvedere Avenue.

Also note that longtime coffee roaster and seller Brett Bunsen (an incredibly funny, progressive voice out there) has opened his outside Caledonia House Coffee stand at the Farmers' Market parking lot: *Mondays through Saturdays, 6AM-2PM.*

There is a Standing Committee on Public Accounts meeting this morning, with an orientation session with Auditor General Jame MacAdams and someone from the Canadian Audit and Accountability Foundation. While this sounds really interesting for the average taxpaying Island resident, it is unfortunately an in camera meeting, so not broadcast or open to the public.

Saturday, September 7th:
Performance: YR. OBEDIENT SERVANT, 2PM, Bonshaw Community Centre. Emeritus Professor Terry Pratt portrays Samuel Johnson in this one-man, full-length slice of 18th-century London life by Kay Eldredge. Admission is by donation in support of the hosting venue. Reserve a seat by calling (902)675-3672.
-----------------------------
Dave Meslin, an Ontario-based community organizer and progressive non-partisan voter, writes on social media yesterday:

"Looking for candidates to support in the upcoming Canadian election? I'm a huge fan of GreenPAC's non-partisan efforts. Here are their endorsements for October, featuring seven Liberals, seven New Democrats, six Greens, four Conservatives, and - my favorite - one independent!

This list comes after months of outreach and consultation with political parties, supporters, environmental organizations, sustainability experts, members of the public and a wide range of other groups. Let’s work together to help these environmental champions win."


DETAILS: https://www.greenpac.ca/federal_election_2019


On P.E.I., Darcie Lanthier (running in Charlottetown) and Anna Keenan (running in Malpeque) have been endorsed by Green PAC. Environmental forums for each Riding on P.E.I. are being hosted by local groups early next month.
---------------------------------
In the early September night sky: https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/lifestyles/local-lifestyles/atlantic-skies-finding-the-north-star-347145/

ATLANTIC SKIES: Finding the North Star - The Guardian column by Glenn K. Roberts

Published on Tuesday, September 3rd, 2019, in The Guardian

A lot of people think that Polaris - the North Star - is the brightest star in the night; nothing could be farther from the truth. When giving a night sky tour to people, as I often get asked to do, and which I am more than happy to do, I have asked them to point out the north star. Invariably, they will point to one of the really bright stars in the night sky, usually Arcturus (mag. -0.05) in Bootes - the Herdsman, Vega in Lyra - the Lyre (mag. +0.02) or Sirius (the actual brightest nighttime star) in Orion - the Hunter (mag. -1.46). When I do point out Polaris to them, they are amazed that it is, in fact so dim (mag. +3.6) and difficult to find. Most people envision Polaris as extremely bright and easy to find; after all, isn’t it used for navigational purposes? Surely, the ancient navigators would have picked a much brighter star to help them find north and, consequently the other three directions.

The selection and importance of Polaris lies not in its brightness, but in its position on the celestial sphere (think of the Earth encased in a clear, outer glass shell) above us relative to the Earth. Polaris lies very close, but not exactly at what is known as “celestial north”. This is the point on the celestial sphere directly above the Earth’s rotational axis, when connected to the Earth’s surface, gives us our geographical reference of “true north”. This differs slightly from “magnetic north”, which we don’t need to worry about for the purpose of this discussion.

The sky area around the “celestial north” (as seen from Earth) is devoid of bright stars. Ancient Greek astronomers and navigators, however, found a star, though dim, that was very close to “celestial north”. Polaris comes from New Latin stella polaris, meaning “pole star”, another name for the North Star. Polaris, although the current North Star, was not always so. In the time of the ancient Egyptians, when the pyramids were being built, the star Thuban in the constellation of Draco - the Dragon was the North Star. In time (though not in our lifetime), other stars in the area around “celestial north” will become the North Star (more about that in another column).

So how do we find the North Star? Here in the northern hemisphere, that is quite easy. The majority of people can recognize and point out the asterism of the “Big Dipper” in the night sky. The Big Dipper is an asterism (think “picture within a picture”) in the constellation of Ursa Major - the Great/Big Bear. Ursa Major is one of several constellations in the night sky which are known as “circumpolar” constellations. This means they circle around the northern pole star Polaris. They are visible on any clear night, as they, at least for us here in the Maritimes, never dip below the northern horizon. Having located the Big Dipper, find the two end stars (sometimes referred to as the “pointer stars”) in the bowl of the dipper, and then connect the two with a straight line (from the bottom star to the top star), continuing the line (about 3x times the distance between the pointer stars) until you come to a semi-bright star sitting all alone; that is Polaris - the North Star. If the sky is dark enough, you will see that it is the end star in the handle of the “Little Dipper” asterism in the constellation of Ursa Minor - the Lesser/Little Bear. Dropping a line from Polaris to the horizon gives your geographical north. Facing this direction and spreading your arms out to the side gives you east on your right, west on your left, and south directly behind.

Jupiter and Saturn continue, as they have all summer, as the prime, naked-eye planets in the late evening sky, though both are setting much earlier (presently around midnight for Jupiter, and shortly thereafter for Saturn) with each passing night. Jupiter can be seen shining brightly at mag. -2.2 in the constellation of Ophiuchus - the Serpent Bearer in the SW sky at twilight. Saturn, at +0.3 mag., shines dimly off to the left of Jupiter, sitting just to the left of the handle of the “teapot” asterism in Sagittarius - the Archer. Both make excellent binocular objects in the crisp, clear night air of September. The remaining “bright planets” (those visible to the naked-eye) — Mars, Mercury and Venus — currently remain lost from sight, as they are too close to the Sun at this time to be visible in the night sky.

Don’t be put off by the lack of bright planets in the night sky this coming week. Once you have looked at Jupiter and Saturn, turn your vision to the multitude of other celestial wonders above you. Just roaming the night sky with a pair of decent binoculars will bring numerous star clusters (both open and globular) into view, not to mention the Moon. Get hold of a good star chart or planisphere, or go online, and get to know your way around the night sky (especially now that you know how to find Polaris - the North Star); there is much to see that will truly amaze you.

Until next time, clear skies.

Events: Sept 6 - First Quarter Moon.

----------------------------
"The true secret of happiness lies in the taking a genuine interest in all the details of daily life."
--- William Morris (1834-1896), British social activist

September 3, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Event today:
Official Opening of the Office for Malpeque MP candidate (Green Party) Anna Keenan, 6:30-8:30PM, 412 TCH in Cornwall (where MLA candidate Ellen Jones' office was, across from the Esso). The Malpeque candidates are incumbent Wayne Easter (Liberal), Anna Keenan (Green Party), Craig Nash (NDP -- formal nomination in a couple of weeks), and Stephen Stewart (Conservatives).

Sunday, September 8th:
PEI Climate Strike Strategy Discussion & Potluck, 4:30-7PM, Bonshaw Community Centre, 25 Green Road. Hosted by Extinction Rebellion. From Tony Reddin: you (& many others) are invited to attend a Potluck and Discussion on actions for/during the Global Climate Strike Week September 20-27. This way we can act with synergy, holding complimentary events, or joining to hold events together, rather than competing with each other! Here is the event:
Facebook event link
Please share with other activists.
-----------------------------
Article:  http://www.peicanada.com/island_farmer/article_5c9f8eee-c2b5-11e9-a204-9f270ac74d3c.html

The line has been drawn - Island Farmer article by Andy Walker

Published on Wednesday, August 21st, 2019

The fate of the Lands Protection Act now rests squarely in the hands of Premier Dennis King and his government. In a move that is brazen even by Irving standards, a daughter of Mary Jean Irving now owns 2,200 acres of land in the Summerside-Bedeque area. This is the same land three companies with the Irving family as shareholders tried to purchase in the spring. The previous Liberal government blocked the sale on the day the election writ was issued. Former cabinet minister Richard Brown said he was acting on the recommendation of the Island Regulatory and Appeals Commission.

This time around, IRAC was left out of the equation. The land was formerly owned by Brendel Farms Ltd. -- a family farm corporation owned by Derrick, Dwight, Megan and Crystal Gardiner. The Gardiners incorporated another company called Haslemere Farms and they transferred the land in question to that company. The new company was then sold to Rebecca Irving, who then changed the company name to Red Fox Acres.

Geoffrey Connolly, a Charlottetown lawyer who represented the Irvings, admitted in a media interview the transaction exploited a loophole-- not in the Lands Protection Act as such but in the new Business Corporation Act brought in by the previous Liberal government last year.Connolly made a point of explaining to the media the land transfer happened while the Gardiners owned the company and Rebecca Irving simply acquired the assets. He also maintains the company is distinct from J.D. Irving and Cavendish Farms. The company's business address is the Charlottetown office of Master Packaging, which has Rebecca's mother as president and CEO.

I agree with NFU District Director Doug Campbell that the move is a "game-changer" for the future of the Lands Protection Act. It is more than that. If it is allowed to stand, the Lands Protection Act is finished as a meaningful piece of legislation. This should not be treated as a one time event but as the latest salvo in the battle for corporate control of PEI farmland.

So far, the government's response has been less than inspiring. Agriculture and Land Minister Bloyce Thompson has largely been hiding from the media since the story broke, only issuing a statement saying he will be asking IRAC to review the transaction.The ball is clearly in the government's court and immediate action is required. The transaction has to be reversed and the legal loophole in the Business Corporation Act must be plugged . That same act also saw the province join a national trend of not requiring companies to publicly declare their shareholders--something that was required previously under the Companies Act. That should be reversed as well.

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"You cannot draw lines and compartments, and refuse to budge beyond them. Sometimes you have to use your failures as stepping-stones to success."
--- Rohinton Mistry (b. 1952), author

September 2, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Hello, all, and Happy Labour Day,
Event today:
Annual Labour Day Picnic, hosted by the PEI Federation of Labour, 11AM-1PM, Joe Ghiz Memorial Park, Charlottetown.
"Come join us for our 19th Annual Labour Day Picnic. We will be having lots of entertainment for the whole family. There will be face painting, a magician and a bouncy house for children. Also we will be serving Hot Dogs, Corn, French fries and more."
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"Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well."
---Jack London (1876-1916)

September 1, 2019

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Today:
Sunday Downtown Market, 11AM-4PM, Lower Queen Street, Charlottetown

Beach Cleanup and Bonfire, 6:30-9:30PM. Grand Tracadie Beach. Hosted by Young Greens of PEI.
"Join the Young Greens of PEI for an evening of cleaning up garbage and enjoying a bonfire n smores!
We will meet at Grand Tracadie Beach (at the end of Beach Road) around 6:30pm to begin the cleanup, followed by a bonfire on the beach.This is a BYOC (bring your own chair) event." More details at: Facebook event link

This week's Legislative Committee meetings:

Topic: The committee will meet to undertake an orientation session with the Auditor General and the Canadian Audit and Accountability Foundation. Please note: this will be an in camera meeting.

  • (Meaning, no public members can attend in the Gallery and presumably it won't be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly's website.)

Topic: The committee will meet to elect a chair and to consider its work plan.

Topic: The committee will meet to consider its priorities and communications plan.
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Article: Some longer pieces for a long weekend reading, from the National Observer: https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/08/27/news/east-toronto-land-dispute-tests-trudeaus-commitment-sustainability

East of Toronto, a land dispute tests Trudeau's commitment to sustainability - The National Observer article by Alistair Sharp

Published on Tuesday, August 27th, 2019

Pressure is building on the federal government to decide the fate of a parcel of land east of Toronto long earmarked for an airport that critics say is unnecessary.

The plan for an airport on rural land north of Pickering was first hatched more than four decades ago, when Pierre Trudeau’s government expropriated 18,600 acres of farmland, including two villages, to create a site to supplement Pearson on the city’s western flank.

It hit various snags over the years, and almost half of the land has since been given over to the Rouge National Urban Park, but some 9,600 acres of mostly prime farmland remain in the possession of Transport Canada.

In the intervening years, scientific consensus has developed around the need to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions (such as those emitted by aviation) to avoid the effects of a warming planet, including crop failures, droughts and floods. Food security has become an important consideration, since produce grown elsewhere could, as a result, fluctuate wildly in price or even become unavailable.

That's why Land Over Landings, a volunteer group that opposes an airport, says the site should instead be used as an urban farming and agri-tourism destination.

“There’s so much fear about what is happening environmentally,” said Sandra Campbell, a longtime supporter and adviser to Land Over Landings and a founder of Abundance GTA, which celebrates urban farming. “The people that flock to farmers markets are there because of a sense that it is one thing they can do.”

But others, including a new crop of local representatives elected late last year, would prefer to see the prime farmland near Canada's biggest city turned to more typical economic development, testing the commitment of Pierre's son, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, to balance the environment and the economy.

Trudeau and his transport minister, Marc Garneau, could technically scrap the airport plan and endorse the urban-farming alternative before an election due in October, but it would be an aggressive bet that choosing food over flying is an electoral-vote winner.

“No government has had the intestinal fortitude, courage, vision and wisdom to create something truly wonderful that would be the envy of the world,” Land Over Landings chairwoman Mary Delaney said.

In any case, the result of the federal election might further shift the political landscape, following municipal votes last October which brought in several representatives supportive of an airport or other development, including Dave Ryan as Pickering mayor, Shaun Collier as Ajax mayor and John Henry as Oshawa regional chairman.

The Progressive Conservative provincial government of Doug Ford has also broadly supported urban development over environmental concerns.

“My fear is that if (federal Conservative Leader Andrew) Scheer is elected, he and Doug Ford will go in cahoots on a deal to free up the land for development,” Campbell said.

One such potential development is Durham Live, a massive new entertainment complex planned by the Apostolopoulos family of developers.

Ford’s government is already pushing in that direction.

In May, Peter Bethlenfalvy, the Progressive Conservative MPP for nearby Pickering-Uxbridge, wrote to Garneau to ask him to either release a long-awaited report on the viability of an airport prepared by consulting firm KPMG or return the lands to the people of the region.

He said the letter was sent with the full support of all PC MPPs in the Durham region as well as the City of Pickering and the Town of Uxbridge.

Meanwhile, the federal member elected in 2015 for the same riding, Liberal MP Jennifer O’Connell, has long opposed the project and recently said she thinks the government has not been convinced of the business case for the airport.

In response to questions from National Observer, Bethlenfalvy's office said the fact that land has sat idle since the 1970s, without a clear federal policy, has stalled economic development and created an "injustice" to the people of the region that "needs to be corrected as a matter of priority."

"While these lands are key to unlocking more economic potential for Durham Region, no development has taken place since expropriation," spokesman Hayden Kenez said. "Without a decision from the federal government concerning the fate of the land, agriculture cannot benefit from long-term planning, residences are not being considered and business cannot flourish."

Still studying

The current Trudeau government says it’s studying the KPMG report it commissioned in 2016 and whose third and final report it received earlier this year.

Asked whether Garneau would make a decision before the October election, his spokeswoman said the file merited wide consultation and that the department expected to complete its policy analysis and provide its advice by fall 2019.

The three-part KPMG report considered whether southern Ontario risks a shortfall in aviation capacity in the next 20 years, how various airport options might fit into the broader regional aviation system, and the revenue-generating potential and economic effects of these options.

“Any future decision on the development of the Pickering Lands will be made based on a sound business case and updated data on aviation demand and capacity,” Garneau’s spokeswoman, Delphine Denis, said in an email.

Denis said the KPMG report is key to the department’s advice, but wouldn’t say what’s in it.

“As the report contains commercially sensitive information on the Canadian aviation industry, we are unable to share the findings publicly at this time,” she said.

Opposition grows

Liberal-turned-Independent MP for nearby Markham-Stouffville Jane Philpott added to the expressed opposition to an airport when she wrote in mid-July that it would be better to develop other transport options and protect valuable farmland.

“As we await this report, I am prepared to confirm that I do not support moving ahead with an airport because of the need to protect our environment and some of the finest agricultural land in the country,” Philpott wrote in a blog post.

She pointed out that there is no good evidence of a sound business case for the airport, with the 2017-2037 Master Plan for Pearson Airport indicating it will have enough capacity to meet the growing demand for air travel over the next two decades.

“Building another large airport is inconsistent with the crucial transition of our nation to a low-carbon economy,” she wrote. “Investing in more environmentally friendly infrastructure like high-frequency passenger rail makes more sense than spending billions of public dollars on an airport.”

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Catherine McKenna says she has done everything she could to fight climate change - The National Observer article by Fatima Syed an Alistair Sharp

Published on Friday, August 30th, 2019
https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/08/30/features/catherine-mckenna-believes-she-has-done-everything-she-could-fight-climate

Two days into her job as a rookie environment minister, Catherine McKenna was sent to Paris for the United Nations climate summit, not knowing what “COP21” — the official phrasing for the 2015 meeting — stood for.

She remembers the momentum: the gathering of countries, the urgency, the ambition, the instruction to work closely with Barack Obama’s U.S. administration, the stunned applause when she stood at the podium and said that “Canada is here to help.”

That fateful day in December 2015, Canada joined 195 other countries in committing for the first time to restricting planetary warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels — an improvement on the two-degree commitment that had become par for the course.

But the momentum didn’t last.

Almost as soon as Canada got serious about the climate change emergency, McKenna and her government began fighting provinces over its plan to uphold its Paris commitments by putting a price on pollution.

<SNIP> Rest of the story at the link
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"Sunrise, sunset, Sunrise, sunset
Swiftly flow the days
Seedlings turn overnight to sunflowers
Blossoming even as we gaze

Sunrise, sunset, Sunrise, sunset
Swiftly fly the years
One season following another
Laden with happiness and tears."

--excerpt from the song Sunrise, Sunset,
by Sheldon Harnick,
from the musical Fiddler on the Roof
 
After taking this person off to University

Frank, Spring 2012, along the "Plan B highway" surveyor's cut

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