CaNews Archive‎ > ‎

October 2020

Contents

  1. 1 October 31, 2020
    1. 1.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  2. 2 October 30, 2020
    1. 2.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 2.2 LETTER: We need climate action instead of talk - The Guardian Letter to the Editor
  3. 3 October 29, 2020
    1. 3.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 3.2 DID STEVEN MYERS AND TRUMP GO TO THE SAME DEBATING SCHOOL? - The Guardian Letter to the Editor
    3. 3.3 Federal government says no funding applications have been submitted for West Royalty school expansion - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
    4. 3.4 Cate Blanchett: 'Covid-19 has ravaged the whole idea of small government' - The Guardian (UK) article
  4. 4 October 28, 2020
    1. 4.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 4.2 15 Haviland 99-unit Update and URGENT Concerns - from the website StopKillamPEI
    3. 4.3 LETTER: Don't write Dennis King a blank cheque -The Guardian Letter to the Editor
  5. 5 October 27, 2020
    1. 5.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  6. 6 October 26, 2020
    1. 6.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 6.2 The dispute over Nova Scotia's Indigenous lobster fishery, explained - The National Observer article by Michael MacDonald
    3. 6.3 Atlantic Skies for October 26th-November 1st, 2020 "A Rare Celestial 'Treat" for Halloween" - by Glenn K. Roberts
  7. 7 October 25, 2020
    1. 7.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 7.2 'Democracy is never a finished product': P.E.I. PR event to hear Scottish experience - CBC online post by Kevin Yarr
  8. 8 October 24, 2020
    1. 8.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 8.2 LETTER: Recent government swings and misses on climate change action - The Guardian Letter to the Editor
  9. 9 October 23, 2020
    1. 9.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  10. 10 October 22, 2020
    1. 10.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 10.2 GUEST OPINION: Land matters and District 10 byelection - The Guardian Guest Opinion by Marie Burge
  11. 11 October 21, 2020
    1. 11.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 11.2 P.E.I. government aims for 2040 climate target, but offers few details on how to reach it - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
  12. 12 October 20, 2020
    1. 12.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  13. 13 October 19, 2020
    1. 13.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  14. 14 October 18, 2020
    1. 14.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 14.2 New Zealand's Ardern wins 'historic' re-election for crushing COVID-19 - Reuters News Service article by Praveen Menon
  15. 15 October 17, 2020
    1. 15.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 15.2 What drought? The worst drought New Brunswick has seen in decades - nbmediacoop.org post by Drew Gilbert
  16. 16 October 16, 2020
    1. 16.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 16.2 Opportunity to apply for 2020 Hilda Ramsay Student Award - The Guardian
  17. 17 October 15, 2020
    1. 17.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 17.2 Percy Schmeiser, farmer known for fight against Monsanto, dead at 89 - CBC News post by Heidi Atter
  18. 18 October 14, 2020
    1. 18.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 18.2 Zac Murphy says local issues in Charlottetown-Winsloe are his focus more than the provincial stakes - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
    3. 18.3 ATLANTIC SKIES: Things that whizz by in the night (and how to find them) - The Guardian column by Glenn K. Roberts
  19. 19 October 13, 2020
    1. 19.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  20. 20 October 12, 2020
    1. 20.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  21. 21 October 11, 2020
    1. 21.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  22. 22 October 10, 2020
    1. 22.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 22.2 PAUL SCHNEIDEREIT: Partisan politics and the pitfalls of tribalism - The Chronicle Herald column by Paul Scheidereit
  23. 23 October 9, 2020
    1. 23.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 23.2 JIM VIBERT: Climate crisis takes backseat to COVID - The Guardian column by Jim Vibert
  24. 24 October 9, 2020
    1. 24.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 24.2 JIM VIBERT: Climate crisis takes backseat to COVID - The Guardian column by Jim Vibert
  25. 25 October 8, 2020
    1. 25.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 25.2 LETTER: Greed and arrogance - The Guardian Letter to the Editor
  26. 26 October 7, 2020
    1. 26.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 26.2 Customized ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ home in Port L’Hebert, N.S., left to Nature Trust - Global News post by Karla Renic
    3. 26.3 Hospital delivery only: In PEI, midwives are not an option for pregnant women - The Globe and Mail article by Alex Cyr
  27. 27 October 6, 2020
    1. 27.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 27.2 RUSSELL WANGERSKY: Walk away, re-energize, re-engage - The Guardian column by Russell Wangersky
  28. 28 October 5, 2020
    1. 28.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 28.2 EDITORIAL: Hands off water supply in futures trading - The Guardian Main Editorial
    3. 28.3 Atlantic Skies for October 5th-11th, 2020 "-A Celestial Challenge" by Glenn K. Roberts
  29. 29 October 4, 2020
    1. 29.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 29.2 Zack Bell wins hotly contested P.E.I. PC nomination in District 10 - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
  30. 30 October 3, 2020
    1. 30.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
  31. 31 October 2, 2020
    1. 31.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 31.2 P.E.I. water coalition urges province to maintain moratorium, proclaim Water Act - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
  32. 32 October 1, 2020
    1. 32.1 Chris Ortenburger's CANews
    2. 32.2 GUEST OPINION: Way past time to settle water issue - The Guardian Guest Opinion by Gary Walker

October 31, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Farmers' Markets:
Charlottetown, INSIDE, 9AM-2PM, new protocols in place
Summerside, INSIDE, 9AM-1PM


Happy Hallowe'en! 
A funny little article for the grown-ups, from The Tyee

"Modern Day Scaries"
by Dorothy Woodend
published in The Tyee, Friday, October 30th, 2020
"Given all this (sweeping gesture), I can’t believe I was ever scared of a dude in a hockey mask."

Link only:
https://thetyee.ca/Culture/2020/10/30/Modern-Day-Scaries/


Citizens' Alliance D10 Lightning Round Q&A
Here are a set of videos, produced by Isaac Williams, of short interviews conducted by the Citizens' Alliance with three of the candidates in the District 10:Charlottetown-Winsloe byelection.


Zack Bell of the PEI Progressive Conservatives
Lynne Thiele of the New Democratic Party of PEI and
Chris van Ouwerkerk of the Green Party of PEI

(unfortunately, we couldn't make a time work with Liberal candidate Zac Murphy)

Here is the playlist on YouTube, which has the full 20minute interviews with the three, and then edited  answers from each candidate to a handful of the 13 questions we asked.
The interviews were conducted on October 28th and 30th, at the campaign offices of Chris van Ouwerkerk and Zack Bell, and Lynne Thiele's home. 

The questions were submitted last weekend by various environmental and social justice groups.

Link to the Playlist of the three main videos and edited options.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbJQ1zGlwhQIKSz2uXAp9swHdL2of-GRT

We hope you find them interesting and useful, and can share them as a playlist or the individual combinations.


Saturday (and Sunday) Opera Offerings

Radio:
Saturday afternoon, with Ben Heppner, 1PM, 104.7FM
Best Opera Ever Series,
with conductor James Conlon,  presenting a double bill of Alexander Zemlinsky's 1-act operas
Eine florentinische Tragödie and Der Zwerg
more details at:
https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/2-4288-saturday-afternoon-at-the-opera
----------------------
Video streaming: Metropolitan Opera:

Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov, until noon today
Starring Ekaterina Semenchuk, Aleksandrs Antonenko, Oleg Balashov, Evgeny Nikitin, René Pape, Mikhail Petrenko, and Vladimir Ognovenko, conducted by Valery Gergiev. From October 23, 2010.

John Corigliano’s The Ghosts of Versailles, 7:30PM until 6:30PM Sunday
Starring Teresa Stratas, Håkan Hagegård, Gino Quilico, Graham Clark, Marilyn Horne, and Renée Fleming. From January 10, 1992.  "What happened to Figaro and his friends after the events told in Rossini’s and Mozart’s operas? One possible sequel is told in John Corigliano’s “grand opera buffa” The Ghosts of Versailles—an uproariously funny and deeply moving work inspired by Beaumarchais’s third Figaro play, La Mère Coupable..."


Global Chorus for October 31
Alex Shoumatoff


The latest studies are not encouraging: we are too selfish to make the sacrifices necessary to turn around global warming. Species and languages and the last tribal subsistence cultures are disappearing at ever-accelerating rates, and their ecosystems as well. Extreme weather events are more common and intense. More and more people are living in cities and having little or no contact with the natural world, spending their lives indoors staring at screens, prisoners of gizmos. The modern world, the whole world, it seems, is disintegrating economically, ecologically and ethically. There are way too many of us. We have been too fruitful and multiplied too much and consumed too many of the fowls of the air and the fishes in the sea and there is no health in us, or in the Earth which we are laying waste to.

Our only hope – and there is always hope, even in the face of this, the greatest challenge we’ve ever faced to our continued collective viability – is to devise a completely new system of governance, a new way of doing business on and with the planet, based not on getting as much as you can for yourself but on the premise that every living thing has the right to be here and a role to play. The remaining animistic societies, with their deep understanding of the kinship of all life, have much to teach us: to widen our circle of caring to embrace the cosmos, and all our brothers and sisters, human and non. We are the Walrus. Every living thing is a “person.” So does Buddhism. The planet needs more female nurturing energy to heal from and counteract all the run-amok male resource-gathering energy. If millions of us come together to forge this new empathetic civilization – there are thousands of ways to help the cause – maybe we can get out of this. It will be very interesting to see if we can make this adaptation, if the forces of good can prevail. They will have the instinct to survive on their side, and nothing is more powerful. Except the course of nature.

       — Alex Shoumatoff, contributing editor to Vanity Fair, editor of

   DispatchesFromtheVanishingWorld.com

from the home page:
"Dispatches From The Vanishing World was started in 2001 to raise consciousness about the world’s fast-disappearing biological and cultural diversity. It provides first-hand, in-depth reporting from the last relatively pristine places on earth, identifies who and what is destroying them, and who is engaged in the heroic  and often life-threatening struggle to save them. It also has photography, art, memoir, travelogue, and fiction– all of which provide information about and insights into the world we live in and are doing in and DVW is trying to save."

----------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 30, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Last Advance Poll for the District 10 Byelection, 9AM-7PM, Community Church at 162 Sherwood Rd. "Bring your Voter Card, ID and mask." 

Farm Centre Legacy Garden sale, 9AM-4PM, back parking lot.  Many vegetables, herbs, fruits and tea for sale.

Fridays4Future, 4PM, outside Province House.  A weekly reminder that our leaders need to urgently move forward on fighting the climate crisis.

Deadline for comment, today, on, you know, remuneration*:
The Indemnities and Allowances Commission is meeting to consider remuneration for Members of the Legislative Assembly and invites the public to submit their views in writing to assembly@assembly.pe.ca by Friday, October 30, 2020.
*definition: "money paid for work or a service"

A note that
tomorrow, the Charlottetown Farmers' Market will be INSIDE only, the hours shifting to 9AM-2PM, and new protocols which you can review here: https://charlottetownfarmersmarket.com/


The Citizens' Alliance has filmed "Lightning Round" interviews with two of the four candidates for the District 10 Byelection, and filming a third today.  We will get them up on the Facebook page as soon as possible today and this weekend, each being a bit over twenty minutes.  We thank many groups and individuals on the Island for submitting questions, and the three candidates who made time for this.
Citizens' Alliance Facebook page.


A shout out to Tony Reddin of Bonshaw and of our Planet Earth, who has volunteered so extensively for ECOPEI and Atlantic Chapter of the Sierra Club, and who is working tirelessly, to remind government of its responsibilities and promises regarding the climate crisis, and to encourage it to do better.  Anyone interested in helping can contact him via Tony Reddin on Facebook.


And Marilyn MacKay and may others contribute so much to the climate movement: https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/letter-we-need-climate-action-instead-of-talk-512822/  

LETTER: We need climate action instead of talk - The Guardian Letter to the Editor

Published on Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Re: P.E.I. government aims for 2040 climate target, but offers few details on how to reach it, The Guardian, Oct. 21:

The P.E.I. government has pledged to reach net zero electricity by 2030 and net zero GHGs by 2040. But when will the P.E.I. government take on the meaningful action needed now to achieve this goal?

This confusing announcement of more consultations with few details adds to our disappointment with the provincial government’s response to our recent Global Climate Action Day Rally; many young people and other Islanders turned out to support the Fridays for Future world-wide movement (started by Greta Thunberg) demanding action on the climate crisis, but no Conservative MLAs accepted the invitation to attend.

Climate disruption is now a reality, our oceans are warming, a million species of animals and plants are at risk of extinction, and the ecosystems on which we and all other species depend are deteriorating rapidly.

All political decisions must now address the climate crisis, and promote protection and restoration of nature, instead of destruction.

We are dismayed that we have had no meaningful response yet to our requests for climate action presented to Environment Minister Jameson July 29.

We were pleased to see that the special legislative committee on climate change has resumed meetings, but why has there been no public action from government on the recommendations in the interim report from that Committee, other than encouraging telecommuting?

We are what we do, not what we say we'll do.

Marilyn McKay, David Woodbury, Dawn Murphy, CJ Verbeem, Donna Wigmore, Christine Gates, Douglas Carmody, Tony Reddin, on behalf of the P.E.I. Fridays for Future Climate Action Group.

-30-

  A note that the update from the Climate Change Secretariat's office on the Climate Change Action Plan did not take place in the Special Committee on Climate Change yesterday, but is now scheduled for next Thursday.


"Politics in Opera" Week continues from the Metropolitan Opera video library

John Adams’s Nixon in China, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Kathleen Kim, Janis Kelly, Robert Brubaker, Russell Braun, James Maddalena, and Richard Paul Fink, conducted by John Adams. From February 12, 2011.

Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov, tonight 7:30PM until Saturday 6:30PM
Starring Ekaterina Semenchuk, Aleksandrs Antonenko, Oleg Balashov, Evgeny Nikitin, René Pape, Mikhail Petrenko, and Vladimir Ognovenko, conducted by Valery Gergiev. From October 23, 2010.  Was Boris Bad Enough, was he Good Enough? You decide, but Rene Pape is amazing.


Global Chorus essay for October 30
Anna Warwick Sears


All our names are writ in water. From foods to droughts, from canal building to wetland draining, to the simple act of fetching with gourd or bucket, water has marked the rise and fall of people and civilizations. Is the water fresh or salty? Clean, or polluted with chemicals and disease? There is nothing more essential to life. Water forms the blood in our veins and – through plants – gives us food to eat and air to breathe. Water binds us together, as humans and with all other species, as shared inhabitants of our watery planet. This bond is the link to our future. In the developed world, we take water for granted. I can walk to the sink and fill my cup, hot or cold, on demand. Te asphalt shingles on my roof keep out rain and snow. But the water gods of mythology were capricious. Climate change is reminding us that water has vast power – as tides flow into city streets, and deep droughts dry up crops. Access to water has also been used as a weapon of control, by colonial powers and warlords. Water can be merciless as well as kind.

Yet, in water also lies our hope. Water is so powerful, it can even transcend politics. And in a world that has never had so much knowledge and communication, it brings people to the table – politicians and diplomats, farmers, fishermen and school teachers. Te wave of changes we must make – to our laws, cities and irrigation systems – to accommodate new weather patterns and a swell of population, are changes that relate to water and aquatic systems. We can’t ignore our collective dependence or influence on it. We fail or thrive based on our relationship to water.

     — Anna Warwick Sears, writer, speaker, Executive Director of the Okanagan Basin Water Board 


https://www.obwb.ca/staff/

-----------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 29, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Special Legislative Committee on Climate Change meeting, 1:30PM.
The committee will meet to receive a briefing providing a progress update on work done under the PEI Climate Change Action Plan, from representatives of the Climate Change Secretariat.

The committee will also receive a briefing on agriculture and climate change from Reg Phelan.

The meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page



One of the Many activities with District 10 candidates today:

"Ask Me Anything" with Chris van Ouwerkerk, 6-7PM, online

The Green Party candidate for the District invites you to "participate either by Facebook Live on this event page, or via Zoom by registering at https://zoom.us/.../tJcudO2ppj0sE9Y3pWe1ehol_qCKcPbnaIDs

And also on the D10 Byelection:
The Citizens' Alliance has completed two interviews/ "lightning round" questions with candidates from District 10 yesterday -- so much fun --  which we hope to have up on in the internet later today, and attempt to film the other two candidates before the week is over.


Island (and international) singer Teresa Doyle sings to sweetly, so to the quick about "Loophole Lament", about corporations exploiting loopholes to exploit land or water for profit:
Loophole Lament in YouTube


This text is basically Teresa Doyle's letter to the Editor, which was published in The Guardian Tuesday, October 27th, 2020, but not online that I could find.

DID STEVEN MYERS AND TRUMP GO TO THE SAME DEBATING SCHOOL? - The Guardian Letter to the Editor

EDITOR:
Friday nights CBC interview with Nicole Williams was a shocking performance on the part of a minister. Mr. Myers why did you talk over her very valid and important questions? Kudos to the very professional Nicole Williams.

Let's review: the PC's dropped the ball and didn't get around to applying for the 80% funding contribution from the feds for infrastructure; then they announced a new school for District 10 in the middle of a by-election (patronage at its finest); Sean Casey rightly pointed out that announcing the project before applying might hurt their chances of getting funding; then Myers yelled his face off saying if the feds didn't support the project it was Sean's fault. Good heavens! Steven haughtily declared that they will build it anyway. Who needs 80% federal funding? Not the PCs apparently, but alas it is our tax money, not theirs. The PCs are in disarray, Myers spends first (roads) and gets approval later, capital budgets be damned. God help us all if they get their coveted majority. They don't communicate with each other, let alone the electorate. As for talking to women journalists....wow Steven, even Trump could do better!

This is the second time in a week that Myers successfully irritated 50% of the electorate. Natalie Jameson, Minister of Environment Water and Climate Change stood mute in the background while King and Myers announced plans for net zero by 2040. Ms. Jameson left the room before media questions were asked. Maybe global warming is not her bailiwick, or more likely the good 'ol boys were keeping up the Tory tradition of sidelining females in their own party. I hope the women of District 10 are paying attention!

Teresa Doyle, Charlottetown

And the Stu Neatby article from The Guardian this week, where Myers shows the same pugnacious pique, is here: https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/news/canada/federal-government-says-no-funding-applications-have-been-submitted-for-west-royalty-school-expansion-512925/  

Federal government says no funding applications have been submitted for West Royalty school expansion - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Tuesday, October 27th, 2020

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. —

Despite a mid-week announcement touting new upgrades of three Island schools, the province has yet to submit an application to Infrastructure Canada for the funding needed to make these improvements.

Late Tuesday, P.E.I.’s department of Education and Lifelong Learning issued a media statement indicating that construction and capital improvements to West Royalty Elementary, Eliot River Elementary and Montague Consolidated would be expedited due to federal COVID-19 resilience fund.

“In partnership with the federal government and made possible through the new COVID-19 Resilience Stream infrastructure funding, planned expansions and capital improvements will be completed at Montague Consolidated, West Royalty Elementary School and Eliot River Elementary,” read Tuesday’s release.

West Royalty Elementary is located in Charlottetown-Winsloe, a district that is in the midst of a byelection campaign.

But an email from Infrastructure Canada, the federal agency that is administering the COVID-19 Resilience Stream, said no application has been submitted for the funds.

“Infrastructure Canada has not received an application for the West Royalty Elementary, Eliot River Elementary and Montague Consolidated,” read an email received by The Guardian by a representative of Infrastructure Canada.

The COVID-19 Resilience Fund provides funding for projects in which provincial governments pay 20 per cent of the costs. The federal government would pay 80 per cent.

Parents have raised issue with crowded conditions in the West Royalty school for years. Last fall, Liberal MLA Gord McNeilly told the legislature that classes are situated in broom closets and change rooms.

West Royalty Elementary did not receive funding for an expansion in the fall’s provincial capital budget, although $20 million of funding was allocated for improvements at Eliot River and Montague Consolidated. A $4.7 million allotment for an expansion to West Royalty was included in the 2018 capital budget, passed during the tenure of the previous Liberal government. These funds were allocated to other schools last fall.

Liberal MP Sean Casey said he was contacted after Tuesday’s announcement by both Charlottetown-Winsloe Liberal candidate Zac Murphy and Infrastructure Canada. He said the announcement by the province was unusual as projects involving both federal and provincial dollars are announced jointly, Casey said.

"This was done without the knowledge, consent or involvement of the federal government," Casey said.

"At a minimum it's premature. In its worst-case scenario, the breach of the protocol could possibly jeopardize any future application."

P.E.I.’s Transportation, Energy and Infrastructure Minister Steven Myers confirmed that the application to Infrastructure Canada has not yet been submitted. Myers said the application under the COVID-19 Resilience Stream is in process.

“We have no reason to believe that they won't approve it,” Myers said in an interview. "The way it works is, we would pay 100 per cent of the dollars and then we would get the federal funds back."

Myers could not provide a timeline for commencement of work on the three schools, but said work would need to be completed by the end of 2021 under the requirements of the federal fund.

He also downplayed that the Tuesday’s announcement was related to the Charlottetown-Winsloe byelection. He noted that the announcement included Montague Consolidated and Eliot River, schools not located within Charlottetown-Winsloe.

"In your bubble of politics there's always somebody saying this shouldn't have been announced or somebody wasn't included," Myers said.

"We will have a proper federal announcement whenever they come through with the money. Then at that point, Sean Casey, if he's still elected, will be there."

The governing PCs would have a slim majority in the legislature if PC candidate Zack Bell wins the byelection.

Liberal candidate Zac Murphy said parents in the district are “frustrated and disappointment” with plans for the West Royalty expansion.

"They just seem to have the feeling that this government doesn't seem to care about this particular project. It's been delayed, it's been cancelled, it's been re-announced,” Murphy said.

Charlottetown-Winsloe Green candidate Chris van Ouwerkerk said he was initially happy to hear Tuesday’s announcement about West Royalty. But he said parents are tired of “on-again, off-again” plans for the school.

"It just shows that they're playing games with this byelection, with schools," van Ouwerkerk said.

"It's very important that the voters in district 10 have [a] concrete, real announcement that is not just political trickery."

The Guardian reached out to PC candidate Zack Bell and NDP candidate Lynne Thiele. Calls were not returned by deadline. The Guardian attempted to reach the principal of West Royalty Elementary but was told by a representative of the Public Schools Branch that they would be “declining interviews.”

-30-


"Lunchtime Read" Essay in today's (U.K.) Guardian by Australian actor Cate Blanchett: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/oct/29/cate-blanchett-covid-19-has-ravaged-the-whole-idea-of-small-government

Cate Blanchett: 'Covid-19 has ravaged the whole idea of small government' - The Guardian (UK) article

In this extract from essay collection Upturn, the actor considers the disruptions of the pandemic and the renewed fervour for social and economic justice

Published on Thursday, October 29th, 2020, in The (U.K.) Guardian

The other day I had to go into town for a dental appointment. I put on all sorts of lovely clothes as if I were going out to dinner and an opening night. The prospect of being out and about was both exhilarating and daunting. I so desperately wanted to be among people and in the city, but I’d also completely forgotten what an event was. The dentist did not seem surprised by my sartorial over-commitment – but then, I was not the first patient he had seen since lockdown.

As a person working in the arts sector, the lockdown was strangely familiar on one level – a lot of actors get stuck in a kind of limbo waiting for someone else to give them permission to do what they are good at. It was as if we were all waiting by the phone for our agent to call. It was also strangely unfamiliar because the community that holds us together, the audiences, as well as the changing of the shows and the new releases, were all put on hold too. The flow between us all was severely affected, and I was both heartened and horrified when it began to surface online. Heartened because the urge to express ourselves and the desire to communicate seems undaunted by anything. Horrified because the worst place to rehearse and perform is alone in the mirror, and sometimes the phone is just a mirror.

It was amazing, though: the opera singers belting it out on their balconies, the dancers doing their solos in their living rooms, the DJs setting up on the verandahs of their apartments. Communication is definitely a need and not a want. And talent has to express itself. That need is like the roots of a tree seeking space and nutrition, and that single cell in the root hair that is the porous gateway between the soil and the plant – that exists in all of us, in our need to communicate and make shared sense. The porous gateway between audience and artist is just that – a two-way street where both seemingly separate worlds are alive together. The pub choir where everyone got on a group Zoom and sang. For themselves? Yes. For each other? Yes. For the uni- verse? Yes. Wonderful space that came alive and thrived and tried to reach across the divide.

Covid-19 has made one thing terribly clear – government is not the same as business. The role of government is to regulate and guide the increasingly complex social landscape. Business is only a part of that landscape. Health, infrastructure, the legal system, education: these are not businesses. First and foremost they are part of society, part of our duty to each other and to the system that we are all beneficiaries of – or should be beneficiaries of – but that is a whole other catastrophe that has been made awfully clear in the last six months.

So what has Covid-19 ripped open? The fragility of social space and the robustness of our need to share. The catastrophic misdirection of the past 30 years of economic and social planning (the guiding non-principle being that there is no such thing as society). No, short of nostalgia and regret, Covid-19 has ravaged the whole idea of small government, and highlighted the importance of social and economic justice. Powerfully illustrating these concerns, the most recent wave of Black Lives Matter (BLM) activism has underlined the need for an equitable and humane social plan.

For the arts, I fear the good old days of root and soil porous gateway-ism are a thing of the past. The relationship between artist and audience has changed fundamentally. The tools of the future on hand today, from selfies to Zoom, are just awkward attempts to grab back the surface appearance of connectivity. Real connectivity will need to find a new way. The good news is, it will – and it will be fascinating and illuminating and confronting.

My guess is, it will be in the event. The fabulous event of coming together; gathering and going out (even to the dentist) and I think it will be in politics first and foremost, in argument and protest. The iconic images and moments of lockdown for me are: “I can’t breathe” written on the face masks of the BLM protesters; that courtyard in Italy filled with singing neighbours; that anonymous Lady Godiva protester in Portland, sitting stark naked in front of the police; the quiet skies; and the self-proclaimed business-genius president of the most important democracy in the world recommending ingesting or injecting disinfectant.

The common link between these iconic events is profoundly political, because the political space is where we gather, and with rhetoric or imagery or gesture, with some kind of enhanced reality (let’s call it a performance) we express what we need to say. Each one of these is startling. There is a profound element in them that is revelatory. We engage with the performance of the gesture and the whole of it is greater than the sum of its parts. I think this need to gather is fundamental to who we are, and it has been stymied by Covid-19 but also underlined by it, and that need in us for community addresses the difficult lesson we have to learn: business is not government and government is not a business. The biggest choice as governments began thinking about easing lockdowns, the choice that really seems to divide us deeply, is that between community and economy.

Like life, art can be a business. But like life, art is not all business – and it is that endangered space where life and art are not just about money that government is there to help safeguard.

This is an edited extract from the chapter Australian Stories by Cate Blanchett and Kim Williams in Upturn: A Better Normal After Covid-19, edited by Tanya Plibersek, NewSouth, November 2020, $32.99 RRP


Met Opera streaming:

Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra, today 6:30PM
Starring Adrianne Pieczonka, Marcello Giordani, Plácido Domingo, and James Morris.  From February 6, 2010. 

John Adams’s Nixon in China, tonight 7:30PM until Thursday about 6:30PM
Starring Kathleen Kim, Janis Kelly, Robert Brubaker, Russell Braun, James Maddalena, and Richard Paul Fink, conducted by John Adams. From February 12, 2011.   I mean, who can resist an opera about Richard Nixon? "From the pomp of the public displays to the intimacy of the protagonists most private moments, Adams, Sellars, and librettist Alice Goodman reveal the real characters behind the headlines in this landmark American opera."


Global Chorus essay for October 29
Stephen Hawking


As we stand at the brink of a second nuclear age and a period of unprecedented climate change, scientists have a special responsibility, once again, to inform the public and to advise leaders about the perils that humanity faces. As scientists, we understand the dangers of nuclear weapons and their devastating effects, and we are learning how human activities and technologies are affecting climate systems in ways that may forever change life on Earth. As citizens of the world, we have a duty to share that knowledge, and to alert the public to the unnecessary risks that we live with every day. We foresee great peril if governments and societies do not take action now to render nuclear weapons obsolete and to prevent further climate change. …

We are entering an increasingly dangerous period of our history. Our population and our use of the finite resources of planet Earth are growing exponentially, along with our technical ability to change the environment for good or ill. But our genetic code still carries the selfish and aggressive instincts that were of survival advantage in the past. It will be difficult enough to avoid disaster in the next hundred years, let alone the next thousand or million. Our only chance of long-term survival is not to remain lurking on planet Earth, but to spread out into space.

There are so many questions still to answer

     — Stephen Hawking (1942-2018), emeritus Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, author of A Brief History of Time

  -----------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 28, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Special Committee on Government Records Retention,10AM
with Brad Mix and Bobbi-Jo Dow Baker (these are key people in the  e-gaming e-mails)

Health and Social Development, 1:30PM
-- Committee outreach programs preparing for winter and the pandemic

To watch:
Website:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

----------------
Tomorrow,
Thursday, October 29th, but not happening:

for the second or third time, the Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability's meeting with EnergyPEI for the update on the PEI Energy Strategy is cancelled.


Farm Centre Legacy Garden news:
Last week of Garden produce and products sale, 9-4PM, back parking lot of Farm Centre,  420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.

"Our number will be on the orange trailer in the Farm Centre parking lot if we happen to be inside or out in the field.
Produce (tomatoes, tomatillas, onions, garlic, cabbage, apples, pears, squash, etc.) and dried herbs, and special teas -- mint and herbal blend  "This would make a great local Christmas present for your friends and loved ones! If you missed us on CBC last week, here's the article about our tea:
CBC story link
You can also order here: https://forms.gle/tseV6rMoWTsbzdge9


Maybe start with monstrosities like the Killam/Haviland supercomplex that just don't fit with the whole heritage bit...

from Facebook posting, yesterday:
"The Charlottetown Area Development Corporation (CADC) is planning for future development and streetscape improvements in the historic district surrounding Province House, including Victoria Row and Sydney Street. To ensure the proposed changes reflect the wishes and needs of the community, they are asking the public to share ideas and concerns for this project by completing a quick online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R7XTWBN


update, some bold text is mine. https://www.stopkillampei.com/news/15-haviland-99-unit-update-and-urgent-concerns

15 Haviland 99-unit Update and URGENT Concerns - from the website StopKillamPEI

Published on Tuesday, October 27th, 2020
(The) Following is a summary of important recent developments re the proposed 15 Haviland 99-unit project.

On Friday, October 16, an article, headlined "Charlottetown mayor commits to asking new planning committee to review development bylaw", appeared in the Guardian newspaper. 

On Saturday, October 17, Doug MacArthur, Coordinator, Stop Killam PEI 15 Haviland project emailed Mayor Brown and Council to summarize again the deficiencies in the 15 Haviland City approval process and to request that the project be thoroughly reviewed.

On Sunday, October 18, Mayor Brown addressed Mr MacArthur's concerns re 15 Haviland in an email response by stating, "I am in total agreement with you that professional planners like yourself and our planning staff must address the issues you have brought forward through professional lenses... Furthermore, as I have stated publicly, I gave notice at our last Planning Committee meeting to discuss a review of our Zoning & Development By-Laws and a plan of action going forward."

On Monday, October 19, Tim Banks [Killam's representative/spokesperson on Killam's proposed 15 Haviland Street 99-unit building] contacted concerned residents of Renaissance Place [13 Haviland 41-unit apartment building] requesting a meeting for the following day to discuss the project and possible changes in building plans. The meeting was held and well-attended at Renaissance Place on Tuesday, October 20.  Rather than the concerned seniors and others being advised of potentially positive changes in the 99-unit building plans by Killam's spokesperson, the audience was advised of Killam's latest 15 Haviland plans which are even more concerning than the initial, totally unacceptable project.

Some of the statements/intentions cited by Killam's spokesperson at last Tuesday's meeting are shocking, and require immediate consideration by the City before possible irreparable damage is done. There are also major immediate concerns/responsibilities affecting the Province [e.g. buffer zone, including harbour landfilling, tree removal, excavation, other environmental] and the Govt of Canada [eg tidal/fishery area infilling, access across Armoury property for construction/harbour infill purposes].

Killam's spokesperson, Tim Banks, stated the following at the Tuesday, October 20, 2020, meeting at Renaissance Place re the 15 Haviland 99-unit project.

  • Paid $2.2 million for the land and have also invested over $500K in drawings. "If someone wants to give me $2.7 million, I'll go away."

  • "Didn't buy the property until it was completely signed off by the Mayor & Council."

  • "I've heard your comments on the view planes so I may turn the building around."

  • There is no buffer zone that applies because Killam bought the property with a water lot that goes 800 feet into the water and can build there and build another building on the reclaimed land.

  • CBCL are the climate people who handle climate aspects of Killam projects.

  • Yes, we have approval from the Province.

  • Killam has a request into the Federal Gov't for a temporary roadway through the Armoury property during the construction stage. If can't get access from the Armoury will get it from Holland College. "I'm on their alumni."

  • In the next 7-10 days will be putting up a fence and lifting the boardwalk and relocating it. Can't have the boardwalk where it is during construction. City doesn't have a right over the boardwalk as they didn't protect themselves by renewing their easement.

  • Everyone at City Hall knew all of this before the project was approved.

  • There weren't public meetings because there didn't have to be.

  • May change the building from 2 to 3 levels of parking.

  • Turning the building will cost another $500K for extending riprap into the water.

  • The plan is to start construction by May 15th, 2021.  Construction will take 22 months.

  • In the next 10 days, will be putting up a fence and removing the boardwalk. We can do what we like to do without a permit.

  • The trees have to go.

  • "You don't have any basis for a traffic study unless there are 300 households involved."

  • We could do 140 units if we could justify the parking.

  • 90% sure we are going to turn the building if the soil conditions allow. Will be doing a survey and some digging related to an existing old tunnel.

  • "We have a permit to extend the riprap." The Province can't stop us from developing all of the water lot out to 800 feet.

The foregoing Killam spokesperson statements should cause grave concern at all three government levels and within our community.  We have built too fine a city and a waterfront to have it seriously compromised by what this developer is proposing. What is being proposed by Killam is also causing great distress to seniors in the neighbourhood whose comments at last Tuesday's meeting included: "Charlottetown has sold its soul. And to Mr Banks," "Please go home. Think about this and don't think about the dollars." "Fifth rate project."

Unless regulatory authorities act appropriately, fences could be going up and the present 15 Haviland boardwalk removed this coming week, with other site development steps to follow. All in the name of a terrible project which should never have seen the light of day in the first place. I urge our elected officials to please get a handle on this situation before it deteriorates further. Please contact City, Province and Federal elected representatives to voice your concerns and to request action to put a hold on the aspects of this project which are under their control.
-30-

Some Contact info:

Mayor Philip Brown
902-566-5548 (City Hall)
902-393-2601 (Cell)
902-892-8662 (Home)
mayor@charlottetown.ca

Councillor Alanna Jankov - Ward 1
902-566-5548 (City Hall)
902-393-3999 (Cell)
902-620-3474 (Office)
ajankov@charlottetown.ca

MLA Karla Bernard, District 12: Charlottetown-Victoria Park
Phone: 902-620-3977
Email: kmbernardMLA@assembly.pe.ca

Hon. Jamie Foxx, Minister of Fisheries and Communities

Phone: 902-838-0983
Fax: 902-838-0972
Email: MinisterFC@gov.pe.ca


sharp words, in a politics in life week  https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/letter-dont-write-dennis-king-a-blank-cheque-513101/

LETTER: Don't write Dennis King a blank cheque -The Guardian Letter to the Editor

Published on Tuesday, October 27th, 2020

My father Wendell always said, “Minority governments are the best: they have to work for the people, not themselves.” Coming up to the byelection here in Charlottetown, I have to agree. It doesn't really matter who wins the election because it is usually the politicians who win, not the ordinary fellow, and now is no time to give Premier Dennis King a blank cheque. People need to keep him on the chain, and I will tell you why. Last week in the news the City of Charlottetown announced they would have to slow down a project I think was just grand. They plan on making a nice paved way for people to walk and bicycle without worrying about cars and trucks coming at them, and it will go from the QEH all the way around to our area back of the Towers mall.

As I understand it, the city was doing this on the instalment plan, one part each year for three years, which is a long while to wait, but it is better than having our kids walking along the bypass highway at night. I hate to think of the speeding and racing that goes on there every day.

The King government promised to pay half the cost, which is a good thing considering all the costs the city has already, but after the bids came in this year for the first instalment, the cost was about $600,000 more than was on the books. So the city asked the government to add an additional $300,000 so that they could get this project done. The government said no.

Think about that: we are paving all over P.E.I. this year, paving dirt roads with nobody living on them, and right here, where people are supposed to get out walking, fresh air and avoid COVID-19, Dennis King would not find $300,000 so that the city could pay for the contract, and now it will be done next year instead of now.

That might mean we will not get our instalment until another two years, which is just fine if you are in your government car, Mr. King, but get out of your office on Rochford Street and come out to our area. There are racing cars, terrible noise all the time and not many sidewalks, even if they were safe to be walking on them. 

Shame on you and your candidate Zack Bell who will not stand up for us here who want a good place to live. If you cared one bit about the people you would get this walking path built and do something about the traffic racing up and down the streets. Charlottetown was not able to count on you, and neither should we. You do not deserve a blank cheque. Your name may be King, but you are not my King!

Lorraine Gallant, Charlottetown


superb voices, in "Politics in Opera" Week
Met Opera streaming:

Handel’s Agrippina, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Joyce DiDonato, Kate Lindsey, Iestyn Davies, and more.  From February 29, 2020. Just jaw-dropping, gripping, so-cool modern take on the Roman Empire last days.  One of the last live performances recorded before the pandemic closed The Met.

Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra, tonight 7:30PM until Thursday about 6:30PM
Starring Adrianne Pieczonka, Marcello Giordani, Plácido Domingo, and James Morris.  From February 6, 2010.  So beautiful, traditional setting of Genoa in the 14th Century, so sad.


Global Chorus for October 28

Lisa Bendall

People are often disheartened by the glut of bad news in the world. Every time you turn on the TV, they complain, miserable things are reported.

My comeback: it wouldn’t be news unless it was extraordinary. What rarely makes headlines is the everyday goodness that happens so frequently we can almost forget how special it is: the snow shovelled for a neighbour, for example, or the donated groceries or the compliment that was made on an outfit or the seat that was offered or the door that was held.

Acts of generosity are rampant, pervasive in our world. That’s because the human species evolved to be kind. It’s simple logistics: in a society of compassion, we are more likely to survive and reproduce, passing along these genes for niceness. In fact, there’s increasing and exciting scientific evidence for our biological drive to connect with and help others.

Will we one day ruin ourselves and each other? See, that would go against our nature. Our genetics, I’d like to think, will save us well before the end. I remain optimistic.

    — Lisa Bendall, freelance writer, blogger,

https://www.lisabendall.com/

--------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 27, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup: https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/

Standing Committee meetings today:
Public Accounts at 9:30AM  -- Seniors housing recommendations and Fall Fiscal updates

Education and Economic Growth at 2:30PM -- reopening schools

"The committee will hear from two groups on the how the reopening of schools has been handled:

Please note: The PEIHSF will also be speaking on the topic of elected school boards and their presentation will begin at 4:00 p.m.

  • Bluefield Family of Schools District Advisory Committee (Amanda Doherty-Kirby)

  • PEI Home and School Federation (representatives to be determined) "

The meetings will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page.

Website:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

Also note:

The Indemnities and Allowances Commission is meeting to consider remuneration for Members of the Legislative Assembly and invites the public to submit their views in writing to:

Indemnities and Allowances Commission

c/o Office of the Clerk

197 Richmond Street

PO Box 2000

Charlottetown, PEl C1A 7N8

Fax: 902-368-5175

assembly@assembly.pe.ca

by Friday, October 30, 2020.


Here is Stu Neatby's report of the Standing Committee presentation last week from Yefang Jiang.  https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/hydrogeologist-model-suggests-high-capacity-wells-could-reduce-streamflows-by-40-per-cent-in-wilmot-river-513454/ 
NOTE:  the link to the article has a couple of slides illustrating the talk, and the complete presentation video can be found at the Legislative Assembly website.

Hydrogeologist model suggests high capacity wells could reduce streamflows by 40 per cent in Wilmot River - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby
Published on Monday, October 26th, 2020

A model developed by a hydrogeologist suggests that, in a dry growing year, expanded agricultural irrigation from high capacity wells could have a significant impact on water levels in Island streams.

Yefang Jiang, a hydrogeologist with Agriculture Canada, told members of the standing committee on natural resources and environmental sustainability that he had prepared a model to predict the impact of expanded agricultural irrigation on the Wilmot River watershed. 

Jiang’s models were based on base flow levels observed in 2000 and 2001 in the Wilmot watershed. 

"I simulated two years, 2000 and 2001. Why did I pick 2001? Because that was a historic dry year," Jiang told members of the committee.

Some farmers have compared this summer’s dry growing conditions to the dry conditions observed in 2001.

Jiang’s model found that a significant increase in agricultural irrigation during a summer with 2001-like conditions would have reduced the streamflow by 40 per cent in the Wilmot River watershed.

Jiang assumed that all potato fields surrounding the Wilmot River would make use of more intensive irrigation, and that most irrigation would take place in July and August. He assumed 10 inches of water would be applied due to the drier conditions. 

"If you don't pump the right amount, you pump a lot, you could potentially bring the water to a low level," Jiang said.

A moratorium on high capacity wells for agricultural irrigation has been in place since 2002. The province’s new Water Act, likely to be proclaimed this fall, would uphold this moratorium for the time being.

But in February, officials with the Department of Environment, Water and Climate Change suggested to members of the standing committee that P.E.I. had ample water resources. The officials said agriculture accounted for only two per cent of P.E.I.’s groundwater use, and that only 35 per cent of P.E.I.’s total groundwater recharge is available for human use.

What is water recharge?

  • Recharge refers to water from precipitation that flows through the soil and then enters the groundwater flow system, contributing to replenishment of the aquifer.

Groundwater discharge contributes to 65 per cent of the annual streamflows in P.E.I. rivers. Some conservation groups have expressed concern about the impact that expanded use of high capacity wells could have on aquifers and aquatic ecosystems.

The P.E.I. Federation of Agriculture (PEIFA) has called on the province to lift the moratorium. In September, PEIFA president Ron Maynard said the continued moratorium was “discriminatory towards the industry” as other forms of non-agricultural groundwater extraction are not subject to it.

On Thursday, Jiang told the committee issues of groundwater extraction should be looked at in terms of the impacts during dryer summer months.

Water recharge from rain or snowmelt occurs during the fall, winter and spring. 

"The problem here is, we have a lot of water. But the water normally comes in the season where nobody wants water,” Jiang said. “But in the season you want water, there is very little storage in the aquifer."

UPEI researcher Michael van den Heuvel has proposed a three-year study on the impact of high capacity wells on streamflow levels. The study would require a legislated exemption from the moratorium to proceed.

Jiang did not declare an opinion on whether or not maintaining the moratorium on high capacity wells is desirable.

"The question is more political than it is scientific, isn't it, on whether or not that's an acceptable risk to the stream?" asked Green MLA Lynne Lund on the question of high capacity wells.

"I think this is the question you (will) answer. I cannot answer that question for you,” Jiang said. "It's a value decision, what's acceptable. There's no solid science to say so yet."

-30-


Met Opera video-streaming:

Verdi’s Don Carlo, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Renata Scotto, Tatiana Troyanos, Vasile Moldoveanu, Sherrill Milnes, and Paul Plishka. From February 21, 1980.  Traditional opera look and setting, very intense, dramatic and beautiful.

Handel’s Agrippina, tonight 7:30PM until Wednesday about 6:30PM
Starring Brenda Rae, Joyce DiDonato, Kate Lindsey, Iestyn Davies, Duncan Rock, and Matthew Rose, conducted by Harry Bicket. From February 29, 2020. Modern opera look and setting, very intense, dramatic and stirring.


It was terribly sad to hear that Silver Donald had passed away in late Spring this year.

His The Green Interview site is here: https://thegreeninterview.com/  a treasure trove of interviews with people about caring for the Earth, the future of the Earth, environmental rights, and more.

An obituary that tries to capture some of what he did is here: http://www.arimatheafuneral.ca/obituaries/2020/6/6/donald-silver-donald-cameron
----------------------------
Global Chorus essay for October 27
Silver Donald Cameron


I’m breathing hard in the thin air. Gazing at Taktshang Goemba, “The Tiger’s Nest.”

A magnificent Buddhist monastery. Gold, white, burgundy. Hanging on a cliff-face in Bhutan. Across a deep gorge from me.

I’m 72 years old. Yesterday: New Delhi, elevation 233 m. Today: 3120 m. I’ve climbed 700 m from the Paro Valley floor, far below. Grinning Bhutanese kids scamper past in flip-flops. I climb ten steps. Stop. Breathe.

Buddhists think about breathing. Buddhists believe in the unity of the world.

I believe it too. Breathing unites us.

Air is 1 per cent argon. David Suzuki quotes the astronomer Harlow Shapley, who calculates that a single breath contains 30,000,000,000,000,000,000 argon atoms. Argon is inert. It isn’t absorbed; it doesn’t change. I breathe it out; you breathe it in.

Breathing connects us to all life on Earth, through all of time. I breathe what the dinosaurs breathed, what my seventh-generation descendants will breathe. Each breath of mine includes 400,000 argon atoms that Gandhi breathed. In the Himalayas, half of my oxygen comes from plankton in the sea.

And breath is only one bridge between organisms. Through our digestion, our skin, our voices, our thoughts, the cycle of birth and death, we continuously collaborate with the world around us. As Alan Watts wrote, “We do not ‘come into’ this world. We come out of it, as leaves from a tree.” Or a breath from a body.

We are the world around us.

This is the most important fact of all. Contemporary science knows it. All great wisdom traditions know it. Industrial society blinds us to it. We must strive to see, and to know who we really are. If we act with humility and reverence, the world may yet find us worth keeping.

     — Silver Donald Cameron, author; current host and executive producer of TheGreenInterview.com

-------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 26, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

District 10 byelection advance polls this week:
Monday, October 26
Friday, October 30th
9AM-7PM,
Sherwood Community Church,162 Sherwood Rd. Elections PEI says "Bring your 1)Voter Card, 2) ID and 3) Mask."
The Citizens' Alliance is planning to film a short interview with each candidate this week for social media distribution and ask about issues that haven't gotten too much discussion (environment, electoral reform,.  Election Day is Monday, November 2nd, 2020.
The Legislature's Fall Sitting begins Thursday, November 12th.


Order deadline for local food options this week:
OrganicVeggieDeliver, order by tonight for Friday delivery.  Info at: https://www.organicveggiedelivery.com/

Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup: https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/

Eat Local PEI -- Online Farmers' Market order by Wednesday midnight for Saturday pickup/delivery:
https://www.localline.ca/eatlocalpei

-----------------------
Many interesting Legislative Standing Committee meetings this week, covering a range of topics --

Tuesday, October 27th
Public Accounts at 9:30AM  -- Seniors housing recommendations and Fall Fiscal updates
Education and Economic Growth at 2:30PM -- reopening schools

Wednesday, October 28th
Special Committee on Government Records Retention at 10AM with Brad Mix and Bobbi-Jo Dow Baker (these are key people in all this e-gaming e-mails)
Health and Social Development, 1:30PM -- Committee outreach programs preparing for winter and the pandemic


Thursday, October 29th
Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability, 10AM -- finally the PEI Energy Strategy briefing
Special Committee on Climate Change, 1:30PM --  an update from the Climate Change secretariat's office on the Climate Change Action Plan,  AND Reg Phelan (extraordinary organic farmer) will discuss Agriculture and Climate Change


More at:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/calendar


article: https://www.nationalobserver.com/2020/10/20/news/nova-scotia-indigenous-lobster-fishery-dispute-explained?

The dispute over Nova Scotia's Indigenous lobster fishery, explained - The National Observer article by Michael MacDonald

Published on Tuesday, October 20, 2020

HALIFAX — Tensions remain high in the dispute over the Indigenous lobster fishery in Nova Scotia. Here are five things to know about the situation:

The dispute has a long history.

In September 1999, the Supreme Court of Canada affirmed the treaty rights of the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet and Passamaquoddy bands in Eastern Canada to hunt, fish and gather to earn a "moderate livelihood."

The court decided that a Mi'kmaq fisherman from Cape Breton, Donald Marshall Jr., had the right to fish for eels and sell them when and where he wanted — without a licence.

That ruling was based on the interpretation of the Peace and Friendship Treaties approved by the British Crown in 1760 and 1761, which describe long-standing promises, obligations and benefits for the Crown.

The Supreme Court also said Marshall's treaty rights were protected by the Constitution. However, the court said those rights are limited to securing "necessaries" and do not extend to the "open-ended accumulation of wealth."

The Supreme Court of Canada clarified its ruling and muddied the waters.

Two months after the Marshall decision, the Supreme Court provided a clarification that remains at the heart of the current dispute in Nova Scotia.

The court stated that the constitutionally protected treaty rights cited in the first decision were not unlimited, and the Indigenous fisheries could be regulated.

The court, however, also said those regulations had to be justified for conservation or other important public objectives.

That key caveat is often cited by non-Indigenous commercial fishermen who say they would have no problem with a separate, Indigenous commercial lobster fishery, so long as it complied with federally regulated seasons.

When the Sipekne’katik First Nation launched its self-regulated lobster fishery on St. Marys Bay on Sept. 17, the federally regulated fishing season in that area had been closed since May 31, and it doesn't reopen until Nov. 30.

The federal government has reached fishing agreements with other First Nations in the region.

After the Marshall decision spelled out the extent of treaty rights in 1999, some First Nations started fishing for lobster right away, prompting a backlash from non-Indigenous protesters.

The Mi'kmaq communities at Burnt Church in New Brunswick and Indian Brook in Nova Scotia — now known as Sipekne’katik — defied federal authorities and set traps outside the regulated season.

That led to the seizure of traps, arrests, charges, collisions on the water, shots fired at night, boat sinkings, injuries and threats of retribution.

At the time, the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans assumed an aggressive posture on the water, where DFO boats were spotted ramming Mi'kmaq boats from Burnt Church.

Despite an ugly start, the federal government eventually started helping First Nations build their communal commercial fishing fleets. Between 2007 and 2015, the value of communal commercial landings rose from $66 million to $145 million for the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations.

And in 2019, Fisheries and Oceans Canada signed two 10-year Rights Reconciliation Agreements with the Elsipogtog (Big Cove) and Esgenoopetitj (Burnt Church) First Nations in New Brunswick, and the Maliseet of Viger First Nation in Quebec.

Most Mi'kmaq in Nova Scotia say they aren't interested in selling out their treaty rights.

Bruce Wildsmith, legal counsel for the Mi'kmaq Rights Initiative, has said the 2019 agreements don't meet First Nations' requirements for a licensed moderate livelihood fishery, which he sees as separate and distinct from a regular commercial fishery.

These agreements require Indigenous fishers to adhere to federal regulations, including restrictions on when fishing can take place.

Wildsmith, who represented Marshall before the Supreme Court, says the Mi'kmaq want a moderate livelihood fishery based on separate consultations with the federal government. The fishery would have its own set of regulations based on nation-to-nation agreements that have yet to be drafted, despite years of talks.

Conservation of the lobster stocks is central to the debate in Nova Scotia.

Some commercial fishermen have argued that lobster fishing should not be permitted at this time of year because lobsters moult — shedding their undersized shells — in the midsummer months, which is also when female lobsters can mate.

The Sipekne’katik First Nation, however, has insisted that its fisheries management plan ensures conservation of the lobster stocks, noting that fishing didn't start until Sept. 17. The First Nation has already submitted a fisheries management plan to Ottawa.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 20, 2020.


Atlantic Skies for October 26th-November 1st, 2020 "A Rare Celestial 'Treat" for Halloween" - by Glenn K. Roberts

Although all the little ghosts, goblins, witches and zombies out treat-or-treating on Halloween will be focused on collecting as many treats as possible, there is one "treat" which, if the weather cooperates, will add to the overall spookiness of All Hallows Eve - a rare Full Blue Moon.

The Full Moon on the 31st is what is referred to as a "blue moon", being the second full moon within a calendar month, the first having occurred on Oct 1st (the "Harvest Moon"). The term "blue moon" has nothing to do with the actual colour of the Moon, although there are occasions when, if there is a large volume of particulate matter in the air (such as after a major volcanic eruption), the Moon may have a slight bluish tinge to it when viewed from areas near the eruption. If the particulate material (ash and fine dust) is of a certain size - 1 micron in width - it will scatter the red wavelengths of the Moon's light, allowing other colours to pass through the atmosphere and reach Earth's surface. If you recall my column regarding why the sky is blue, you will remember that the human eye is more sensitive to the blue end of the light spectrum, and, thus, sees the Moon's colour, on such occasions, as a bluish tinge (a tinge rather than a full blue colour because the Moon's light is reflected sunlight, and thus fainter).The term "blue moon"  was initially used (and still is today) by astronomers to refer to the phenomenon of four Full Moons in any given season, as opposed to the standard three (1 per month). However, in 1946, amateur astronomer, James H. Pruett, wrote an article for an astronomy magazine, in which he incorrectly associated the term with the second Full Moon occuring in a given month. Subsequent media use has entrenched this misinterpretation into modern use.

Our Moon has an approximate 29.53 day cycle (referred to as a "synodic month" or "synodic period"), the time period between the same lunar phases, e.g., Full Moon to Full Moon. As this is close to the length of our calendar months, most months have one Full Moon. However, our calendar is based on the Earth's orbital period (365.256 days; called a "sidereal year"), not lunar phases, such that, over time, the synodic period doesn't exactly line up with the lengths of the months. As a result, on average, every 2.7 years, two Full Moons will occur in one month (as in this month). An Oct 31 Full Moon occurs roughly once every 19 years. This is referred to as the "Metonic Cycle", discovered by the Greek astronomer, Meton, in 432 BC. However, this cycle is only accurate to within one day, due to variations in the Moon's orbit around the Earth, and the number of leap days in the 19 yr period. The result is that the Full Moon can fall on Nov. 1 (as it did in 1963, 1982 and 2001), or on Oct. 31 (as in 1925 and 1944). The next Halloween Full Moon won't occur until Oct. 31, 2039, making this month's Full Halloween Blue Moon a rare "treat". When next you hear the expression "once in a blue moon", you will understand that the speaker is probably referring to events that happen infrequently.

Incidently, October's Full Moon is also known as the "Hunter's Moon", in reference to the now-outdated practice of hunting by the light of the Full Moon during this time of the year. As well, because the Moon will be at apogee (its farthest distance from the Earth) on Oct. 30, the slightly, post-apogee Full Moon on Oct. 31 will be referred to, in some media articles, as a "micro-moon" (as opposed to a "supermoon", when the Full Moon is at perigee or closest to Earth).

Mercury, having passed inferior solar conjunction on Oct. 25, is still too close to the Sun to be observed. Venus (mag. -4.02) is still visible in the eastern, pre-dawn sky. It rises around 4:35 a.m., reaching an altitude of 27 degrees above the southeast horizon, before fading from view as dawn breaks around 7:30 a.m. Venus reaches perihelion (closest orbital distance to the Sun) on Oct. 30. Mars (mag. -2.3), just past opposition with the Sun on Oct. 13, shines brightly 8 degrees above the eastern evening horizon around 6:25 p.m., reaching a height of 48 degrees above the southern horizon before disappearing from sight when it drops below 8 degrees above the westrn horizon about 5:30 a.m. Look for the Red Planet to the upper right of the Full Halloween Blue Moon on All Hallow's Eve. Jupiter and Saturn remain early evening objects. Jupiter (mag. -2.2) is visible around 6:25 p.m., 21 degrees above the southern horizon, then sinks towards the horizon and sets around 10:40 p.m. Saturn (mag. +0.57) follows Jupiter into the southern sky around 6: 45 p.m., 22 degrees above the horizon, remaining visible until it sinks below 10 degrees above the southwest horizon.around 9:45 p.m.

Weather permitting, the next couple of weeks will be an optimum time period to view the Zodiacal Light. Visible as a diffuse, roughly pyramid-shaped cone of light above the eastern, pre-dawn horizon (about where the Sun rises), this celestial phenomenon is best seen under a clear, moonless sky away from city lights. It is caused by sunlight reflecting of myriad dust particles within the inner solar system, and is most prominent when the ecliptic (the apparent path of the Sun, Moon and planets across the sky) is tilted upwards relative to the horizon, as it is in both the autumn (above the eastern horizon before sunrise) and spring (above the western horizon after sunset).

Until next week, clear skies, and Happy Halloween.

Events:

Oct. 30 - Moon at apogee (farthest orbital distance from Earth)

            - Venus at perihelion (closest orbital distance to Sun)

       31 - Full Blue Hunter's Moon

Nov. 1  - Mercury at aphelion (farthest orbital distance from Sun)

-30-


Opera video streaming -- comedy last week..."Politics in Opera" this week:
Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Renée Fleming, Elīna Garanča, Erin Morley, Matthew Polenzani, Marcus Brück, and Günther Groissböck, conducted by Sebastian Weigle. From May 13, 2017.

Verdi’s Don Carlo, 7:30PM tonight until 6:30PM Tuesday
Starring Renata Scotto, Tatiana Troyanos, Vasile Moldoveanu, Sherrill Milnes, and Paul Plishka.  From February 21, 1980.   Complicated story of Spain's King Philip II, and Don Carlo, his son, with political and private events unfolding.  About 3 hours 20 minutes.


Global Chorus essay for October 26
Pema Chödrön


We have the capacity to wake up and live consciously, but, you may have noticed, we also have a strong inclination to stay asleep. It’s as if we are always at a crossroad, continuously choosing which way to go. Moment by moment we can choose to go toward further clarity and happiness or toward confusion and pain.

Taking this leap involves making a commitment to ourselves and to the Earth itself – making a commitment to let go of old grudges; to not avoid people and situations and emotions that make us feel uneasy; to not cling to our fears, our closed-mindedness, our hardheartedness, our hesitation. Now is the time to develop trust in our basic goodness and the basic goodness of our sisters and brothers on this Earth, a time to develop confidence in our ability to drop our old ways of staying stuck and to choose wisely.

Our personal attempts to live humanely in this world are never wasted. Choosing to cultivate love rather than anger just might be what it takes to save this planet from extinction.

     —Pema Chödrön, Tibetan Buddhist teacher and author

Pema Chödrön (born Deirdre Blomfield-Brown, July 14, 1936) is an American Tibetan Buddhist. She is an ordained nun, former acharya of Shambhala Buddhism and disciple of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Chödrön has written several dozen books and audiobooks, and is principal teacher at Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, Canada. -- Wikipedia
https://pemachodronfoundation.org/
  -----------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 25, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

City of Charlottetown Curbside Giveway Day, 9AM-6PM.
Facebook event details
Some other communities are following suit

The Art and Culture of Qajas (Kayaks), 3PM, webinar.  All welcome.
"Did you know the qajaq (kayak) is an Inuit invention? Join Maligiaq Padilla (Greenland) and Robert Comeau (Nunavut) to learn about the art of qajaq building and paddling, and its cultural significance across the North..."
Facebook event link

Otello, Stratford Shakespeare Festival production, 2-4PM, CBC TV today


PR on PEI

Willie Sullivan, speaking on the journey to proportional representation in Scotland, was a excellent speaker yesterday online, at a virtual event marking the referendum on P.E.I. in 2019.
The talk is just a bit over an hour, and is here, if you want to catch up and listen to it on a brisk Fall day: The Facebook group page has the recording link


P.E.I. media article https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-pr-symposium-willie-sullivan-1.5774052

'Democracy is never a finished product': P.E.I. PR event to hear Scottish experience - CBC online post by Kevin Yarr

Published on Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Prince Edward Islanders will have a chance to hear how proportional representation works in Scotland during an online symposium this weekend sponsored by Islanders for Proportional Representation.

"Democracy is never a finished product," Willie Sullivan, executive director of the Electoral Reform Society of Scotland and keynote speaker at the symposium, told Wayne Thibodeau on CBC's Island Morning Friday.   "It's a process and it can't stay still, because your society and our world and our technologies don't stay still."

The modern Scottish parliament, established in 1999, has always worked under a proportional representation model, and Sullivan said it has always provided stable government.

"We have governments that sit for four years. Some of them have been coalition governments, some of them have been minority governments," he said.  "They all sit for that period, and they all govern — according to all the survey work — in a pretty efficient and reasonable way and one that's supported by the population."

First-past-the-post world view

A narrow majority of Prince Edward Islanders rejected proportional representation system in a referendum in 2019. That followed a plebiscite in 2016 in which PR was supported.

In both campaigns, one of the main concerns expressed on the 'no' side was that PR would lead to more minority governments, more elections, and less of government getting things done.

Sullivan said that has not been a problem in either Scotland or most other democracies using PR systems.  That problem is built into minority governments under first-past-the-post systems, he said, because unlike PR systems, they are not based on consensus governing.

"If a piece of legislation comes forward and you want to get enough votes, then you have to garner enough votes from across the parliament in order to do it," he said.  "In some ways, that does diminish the power of the whips and the party managers, but I think it's a better thing for democracy."

Finding consensus

As societies become more deeply divided, and people entrench themselves in their own realities based on their social media circles, Sullivan said proportional representation offers a unifying approach.

"If you want a system of government that is better able to deal with that, then you need a system that is based on consensus and representation of a lot of different views. Not just a black or white, wrong or right, we're up-you're down type of politics," he said.

Sullivan also talked about the recent introduction of voting rights for 16- and 17-year-olds, which he said is cultivating valuable political engagement among youth in Scotland.

-30-


Opera notes:  Metropolitan Opera video streaming

Rossini’s Le Comte Ory, today until 6:30PM
Starring Diana Damrau, Joyce DiDonato, Susanne Resmark, Juan Diego Flórez, Stéphane Degout, and Michele Pertusi, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From April 9, 2011.  Crazy fun.

Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier, tonight 7:30PM until Monday about 6:30PM
Starring Renée Fleming, Elīna Garanča, Erin Morley, Matthew Polenzani, Marcus Brück, and Günther Groissböck, conducted by Sebastian Weigle. From May 13, 2017.  A comedy, but such beautiful glints of sadness, too.  And Matthew Polenzani gets to sing for a couple of minutes (as "The Italian Tenor" who comes in to entertain the Marschellin (Renee Fleming) as part of her busy morning routine) and it's just divine.


If you read the Global Chorus essay (below), you see environmental philosopher Matt Foster urging the creation of a social media platform dedicated to tackling climate change and other issues.  Which he wrote in 2013 or so.  And here is appears to be, just getting going earlier this year, slightly unpolished and perhaps stalled a bit by COVID preoccupations, but here and definitely worth poking around in:

from Citizens for Climate website, by Matt Foster: https://citizenforclimate.info/about-citizen-for-climate/
Why 26 Categories

Here are the categories that I offer. It is not carved in stone; it is just one person’s suggestion as a place to start.

The rough list I have compiled was broken out into 26 categories – this can be refined up or down as we progress. Some may not be as relevant as others but all are important in the grand scheme of things.

  1. CLIMATE CHANGE is the most often sited problem in the media and with the environmentalists, but as this is a symptom of the problem then perhaps MISUSE OF ENERGY or simply ENERGY might be a better heading. Let me list the headings alphabetically. In an effort to be brief, I will not speak to some categories.

  2. AIR QUALITY –

  3. DEMOCRACY/VOTING – There are a lot of issues with this category, from Gerrymandering, robo callling, fraud, voting periods, ballot complexity, crazy ID rules and on and on. There are forces that work hard to distort the wishes of the electorate, particularly in countries with first past the post electoral systems.

  4. DRUGS – I put this here as pharmaceuticals end up in all water and elsewhere where they still affect other life forms. Maybe a global commission could look at this.

  5. ENERGY – a primary concern that will not be resolved by driving electric cars alone. We need to stop the waste starting at the well head where they indiscriminately burn off excess gas. We need to curtail the nonsense of tourism space travel before it gets a foot hold; we need to turn down the thermostats and turn off the AC; we need to slow down and reduce engine sizes. We need to make travelers pay for their waste of our primary resource. Realistically we will never stop people from travelling but we can restrict how they do it.

  6. FARMING/FORESTRY-

  7. FISHING/WHALING –

  8. FOOD – a few words of this. There are forces at play that could care less about what is in your food so long as you buy it. These forces are as bad as those of the tobacco industry. They need regulations generated by the people who use the products. More about this is in INFORMATION/EDUCATION

  9. GENETIC ENGINEERING – similar to food argument. They don’t care what happens in the long term as long as there is money made in the short term.

  10. HEALTH – money that should be spent on health of society is squandered on “middlemen” insurance interests. Also health is jeopardized by food interests etc.

  11. HUMAN RIGHTS –

  12. 12.INFORMATION & EDUCATION – I think that we need to start to systematically educate people primarily through dedicated TV. There are no shortage of NGOs with experts and prepared documentaries to satisfy every aspect of every issue. All peoples should demand that our representative governments provide this service and pay for it. That is what democracy is supposed to do.

  13. LAND/SOIL DEGRADATION – lot to be done to protect the soil that provides our food. E.g. stop embalming corpse’s and corrupting ground water.

  14. MINING –

Institutions – I put this here as there are a lot of institutions that work against the interests of people from blatant usury to false information

  1. Nuclear Issues,- like depleted uranium usage

People’s Commons/natural resources – simple -stop wasting finite resources.

Plastic Dangers – possibly as big a problem as energy waste. Again we have a situation where manufactures could care less for the continuance of the planet if they can make a profit today. Recycling plastic is a farce perpetuated to make us feel like we have it under control.

Population – the problem that no one wants to talk about. We need a commission to report on this.

Species (or biodiversity),

Toxins – thousands of problems from many sources.

Trade and Labor –

Transportation – we cannot stop mobility and transportation but we can regulate and tax it.

.Waste/Recycle – important to extend resources but plastic usage should be curtailed as recycling is a joke.

  1. Water Resources,

Open category

<snip>


Global Chorus essay for October 25
Matthew R. Foster


The people and the planet have many dire problems. We must accept that there is only one key with which to effectively tackle these problems. We have given the scientists, corporations, politicians and the UN the opportunity to resolve the global social– ecological crisis; now it is the people’s turn to step directly into the process in a more effective way.

From the Rio Earth Summit of 1992 until now, we’ve seen little meaningful progress. We must ultimately react more quickly and resolutely.

We know the issues; we have unlimited knowledge accumulated in several million NGO databases; we have the means and know-how to communicate globally; we know the power of social media.

We are fragmented and all trying to be heard in our various political systems, which unfortunately are highly influenced by powerful international market forces and unreceptive to our concerns. It is indeed a bad situation in which the whole world shares, but it is not hopeless. Collectively we can propose and significantly influence meaningful changes if we can simply get organized into a cohesive, worldwide movement. Here’s how we could begin:

* Develop a social media site dedicated solely to social–environmental issues.

* Incorporate multi-language capabilities to communicate with the world.

* Categorize all social–ecological issues into manageable groups (to a maximum of 26).

* Prioritize the issues in each category through debate and consensus and put them into a 20- to 25-year plan.

* Use the new site, and/or allied sites, to put the issues to the world’s people for approval in a logical format with a consistent approach (i.e., one issue in each category every two weeks enables the addressing of 26 separate issues per year).

* Forward the duly considered petition, with the names of the signatories, concurrently to the legislatures of all nations, as this is a crucial worldwide emergency that affects everything.

* Require every category unreservedly to have equal weight and equal opportunity to put its particular issues to the public for debate and consideration each year in its turn.

* Accept that time is our unforgiving enemy.

     —Matthew R. Foster, retired engineer, online environmental campaigner


Recent paper on the philosophy "PhilPapers" site:

https://philpapers.org/rec/FOSTHR
-------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 24, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Farmers' Markets in Charlottetown (8-1PM -- outside) It's the last outside market!

and Summerside (9AM-1PM -- INSIDE)

Nature Walk in Stratford with the Stratford Greens (District 5/6), 1:30-3PM, Fullerton Creek Conservation Park.
"Join us for a fun, informative walk in the woods to learn about the various trees and shrubs that make up the Park.  It will also be an opportunity to chat with Green Party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker and District 5 MLA Michele Beaton as well as members of the Coordinating Committee of the District 5/6 Regional Association of the Green Party of PEI....COVID-19 protocols will be in place during the event. Please wear a mask and socially distance when appropriate. Hand sanitizer will be available."

PR Vision 2020 and Beyond -- an online forum with Willie Sullivan from Scotland, 2PM, register (and should be available to view later) at THIS LINK

Islanders for Proportional Representation (IPR) is hosting an interactive online forum. Keynote speaker for the forum will be Willie Sullivan of the Scottish branch of Electoral Reform Society who is deeply involved in establishing Proportional Representation in Scotland. He will speak about how PR is working in Scotland, how difficulties are being addressed, and how a great many of people’s fears about PR are proving to be unfounded.

Islanders for PR Facebook page
--------------------------------------

Sunday, October 25th:
(City of Charlottetown Residents)
Curbside Giveaway Day, all day.

On Sunday, October 25, place your unwanted, reusable items on the curbside in front of your home
Ensure items are disinfected prior to placing on the curb
Mark the items you place along the curb with a sign that says 'FREE'
Remove all unclaimed items by sundown....

Guidelines for items placed on the curb:
https://www.charlottetown.ca/environment___sustainability/sustainability/programs_and_initiatives/waste_reduction_week


definitely a time for baseball metaphors... https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/letter-recent-government-swings-and-misses-on-climate-change-action-509668/

LETTER: Recent government swings and misses on climate change action - The Guardian Letter to the Editor

Published on Thursday, October 15th, 2020

Vital opportunities were bypassed with the 2014 $54 million infrastructure stimulus package. Needed upgrades on bridges, and two bike lanes were great but tragically we’ve maintained our fossil fuel transportation system — one of the major reasons for our climate emergency. This failure delays meeting CO2 reduction targets and is against a just and sustainable recovery.

Most want cleaner, healthier and more efficient and affordable transportation. We expect ministers to plan for building back better (BBB) and now. Absent were expenditures for green energy storage, transmission lines and EV charging stations. There was no substantial moves on active transportation systems nor Islandwide public transportation. When will this happen?

Our climate change secretariat and yet-to-be-appointed departmental climate champions need to participate and lead in BBB project compliance and stewardship. Governments have pledged and are expected to meet science-based climate preserving CO2 reductions through a real BBB recovery. We need more understanding, education and real deep action as climate disasters caused by our dependence on gas cars and fossil fuels are accelerating. House session transcripts see Transportation Minister Steven Myers and officials say “no, no plans” on Island transit while omitting what else could have been done via this fund. No deep consultations on the St Peters Road plans and now this mess. Two rebuilding era swings and misses. We are at a crossroads. Priorities in a climate emergency seem to be paid lip service. Before a potential move to a majority from a win in the upcoming byelection, I’d wait and see how the next pitch is handled before awarding the series.
Douglas Carmody, Summerside


Saturday and Sunday opera:

Radio:
Saturday afternoon, with Ben Heppner, 1PM, 104.7FM
Best Opera Ever Series, with 
Marie-Josée Lord 
Verdi's La Traviata, with Ileana Cotrubaş as Violetta Valery, Placido Domingo as Alfredo, and Sherrill Milnes as Giorgio Germont, conducted by Carlos Kleiber with the Bavarian State Orchestra and Opera Chorus.

I think this is a famous 1977 audio recording, reviewed here.
----------------------
Video streaming: Metropolitan Opera:

Verdi’s Falstaff, until noon today
Starring Mirella Freni, Barbara Bonney, Marilyn Horne, Bruno Pola, and Paul Plishka. From October 10, 1992.   A wonderful classic production!

Met Stars Live in Concert, ticketed on-demand performance, 2PM today.
Diana Damrau and Joseph Calleja in Caserta, Italy.  More info.


Rossini’s Le Comte Ory, 7:30PM until 6:30PM Sunday
Starring Diana Damrau, Joyce DiDonato, Susanne Resmark, Juan Diego Flórez, Stéphane Degout, and Michele Pertusi, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From April 9, 2011.


Global Chorus essay for October 24 
Heather Eaton


Can we get past this crisis? Yes we can. Perhaps we will. The crucial changes require new visions, actions, politics, economics, ethics and so much more. How to do this? There are many ways. This path I walk has three aspects:

1. A substantial knowledge of the dynamics and processes of the universe and of Earth. This changes everything.

2. We, as humans, navigate life within stories, worldviews, or social visions.

3. We need a new vision that empowers and inspires responses to complex global, social and ecological issues.

When we become aware of the wild, ingenious, creative and evolutionary processes of this gorgeous and extraordinary Earth, we experience wonder, awe and even reverence. We see the depth of continuity between the Earth processes and ourselves. Earth is our home, and our source. We are a process of the Earth, a self-conscious element of the Earth’s crust. We live on a thin layer of culture over a vast expanse of nature.

Our stories and visions about what is real, important and vital are too narrow, inadequate and incomplete. So is our response to the current crisis. The relationship between vision and action is crucial to understand. If we contemplate the resourcefulness of the Earth, and that we emerged from and are animated by these great processes, we are inspired and energized. Such awareness leads to a profound spiritual and ethical awakening, and insightful political actions.

We need a spiritual vision that teaches us how to be present to the Earth, on Earth’s terms. Spiritualities are teachers of consciousness, and are as intimate and as vital as breath. They arouse desires, a zest for life and the ability to feel awe and wonder. Spiritualities encourage inner depth, strengthen courage and inspire reverence in the face of the immensity and elegance of existence. Developing a spiritual consciousness is often described as moving from death to life, from illusion to enlightenment, from confinement to liberation.  

We need vision to see our way forward, and for this we need to awaken to Earth.

     — Dr. Heather Eaton, professor at St. Paul University (Ottawa), co-founder of Canadian Forum on Religion and Ecology

---------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 23, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Special Legislative Committee on Government Record Retention, 1:30PM

Topic: Briefing on best practices in record management

The committee will meet to receive a briefing on best practices in records management from Juliana MacEwen of Precision Digital Imaging Services.
The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public. The meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page.
Special Committee's page

This Committee was created as a compromise by the Legislature,  to have some scrutiny of the e-gaming scheme's "lost emails";  and really a peek into some of the shoddy decisions and practices of the last decade or so.  It's happening because a strong Opposition seeking good governance kept working away on how to move any investigation forward.
--------------------
Fridays for Future, 4PM, outside Province House, Charlottetown.
Facebook event details
 


Friday is Food Waste Reduction Day in the City of Charlottetown's focus on Waste Reduction Week.
Three-step plans and many other tips found here.
-------------------------------------------

Some local food notes:
from Margie and Dave Blum at Elderflower Farm in Valley:

We are opening a self serve farmgate store. 

We plan to keep produce and eggs in it all
winter.  You are welcome to drop by for the opening, a cookie or 2 and a farm visit on Sunday October 25 between 1&4 PM. The farm is located at 1921 Selkirk Road, in Valley.

Also we will be offering our frozen products and sprouts for pick up at the farm at your convenience.

Also: Saturday (October 24) we will be attending the market again but only with pre-orders. Please place your orde
r before the 24th.
Moe info:

http://elderflowerorganicfarm.ca/


As and their caucuses gear up for the Fall Sitting, which will start Thursday, November 12th at 2PM, the Committees will sum up their findings in meetings and make recommendations on certain issues via reports to the Legislature.
Standing Committee meeting recordings from recent weeks can be found on the  P.E.I. Legislative Assembly website:

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/index.php/committees

or their Facebook page, with its links and clips:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg


Met Opera:

Rossini’s La Cenerentola, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Cecilia Bartoli, Ramón Vargas, Simone Alaimo, and Alessandro Corbelli. From October 27, 1997.  Cinderella by Rossini!

Verdi’s Falstaff, tonight 7:30PM until about noon tomorrow
Starring Mirella Freni, Barbara Bonney, Marilyn Horne, Bruno Pola, and Paul Plishka. From October 10, 1992.  A classic version.

Tomorrow, Saturday, October 24th:

Diana Damrau and Joseph Calleja Broadcast Online Live in Concert, 2PM (and available to view for two weeks afterwards), tickets for access, $20  Details here

Two of opera’s greatest artists perform live from the Cappella Palatina of the Royal Palace of Caserta 


very visually, and very, very to the point:
A Fridays for Future one-minute video,
from
Fridays for Future.org
Our House is On Fire


also to the point:

Global Chorus essay for October 23
Gary Snyder


I am tired of seeing optimistic hopeful and largely predictable ideas being put forth by very nice people over and over again when no one is asking the hard question of what might work. We need a hands-on, gritty, on-the-ground, post-liberal, post-humanist, post-utopian push into that territory.

      —Gary Snyder, poet, essayist, lecturer, environmental activist

from Britannica.com:

Gary Snyder, in full Gary Sherman Snyder, (born May 8, 1930, San Francisco, California, U.S.), American poet early identified with the Beat movement and, from the late 1960s, an important spokesman for the concerns of communal living and ecological activism. Snyder received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1975. <snip>

A couple of longer biographical sketches of Snyder:

https://www.thoughtco.com/gary-snyder-4706515

https://www.lionsroar.com/national-treasure-gary-snyder/

----------------------------------------
essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 22, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

"If we are to adapt, we cannot permit ourselves to be made to feel helpless."
    ---Robert Sandford, water supporter, from his Global Chorus essay, below


Events:
Legislative Assembly committee meetings:

Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability Committee meeting, 10AM.  

Topic: Briefing on recharge of water and the different types of aquifers

The committee will meet with hydrogeologist Yefang Jiang to discuss the difference between confined and unconfined aquifers and the recharge of rivers and estuaries. 
------------------------------
Special Committee on Climate Change, 1:30PM.

Topic: Agriculture and climate change

The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the California Healthy Soils Program from representatives of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. 

The buildings of the parliamentary precinct remain closed to the public. The meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page.
-------------------------------

The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public for in-person attendance, but this meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page. Audio and video recordings of the meeting and a transcript of same will later be made publicly available as well.

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/

https://www.facebook.com/peileg


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/guest-opinion-land-matters-and-district-10-byelection-511393/

GUEST OPINION: Land matters and District 10 byelection - The Guardian Guest Opinion by Marie Burge

Published on Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

The Coalition for the Protection of P.E.I. Lands is concerned that the District 10 byelection on Nov. 2 seems to be under the radar with minimal public interest or media coverage. However it could be a game changer in P.E.I. politics. It happened once before when Premier Alex Campbell, tottering on the edge of power, was able to form a majority government only because of the Liberal win in the July 11, 1966 byelection in First Kings. The current byelection is important because it could radically change the face of the P.E.I. legislature. However, even more importantly the election results could have a deep effect on what the P.E.I. government does in the near future about the protection of P.E.I. land.

It is likely not intentional that the District 10 byelection is being held at the same time as the public consultations around the P.E.I. Lands Protection Act. Really, not many people even know that there is a current review of the act.

Even with the lack of visibility of the review process, there is in the wider Island community a growing anxiety about how land is increasingly owned and controlled by a few large and powerful corporations and their numerous off-shoots, some of which are clearly interlocking.

What most everyday people know, but what seems hidden to many politicians, is that the power and the octopus outreach of these industrial enterprises is greater than any government. This is a reality regardless of the political stripe of the government. It is incredibly juvenile for any politician, party, or government to act as though they can go head-to-head with the kind of power that resides in the transnational corporate board rooms. Although political power is no match for economic power, parties and governments, if they chose to, have the advantage of calling into play the full force of the law. The laws they make and enforce are the source of the government’s power and authority. Government with strong legislation exercises its authority over the land, how it is owned, controlled and used.

The Lands Protection Act was designed precisely to keep farmland out of the hands of industrial agriculture. It is meant to keep land available for individual bona fide P.E.I. residents and for non-industrial family corporations. That purpose remains constant. There have been serious problems with the enforcement of the act because of the lack of political will and lawyers’ skill in manipulating loopholes.

If there is any hope for the protection of P.E.I. lands and water at this critical time it must be found not only in impressive statements during election campaigns. What is needed now more than ever is a strong and united legislature ready to speak out for the land and for the people. To get back to the quiet byelection in District 10: whoever is elected will be part of the legislative assembly of Prince Edward Island and must represent the interests of the whole Island. We need to hear from the four parties running for that position.

Here are seven questions:

  • How aware are you that P.E.I. land is unceded Indigenous land, under treaty?

  • Do you believe that P.E.I. land should be cared for looking ahead to seven generations?

  • Do you realize that supporting the industrial model of agriculture as an engine of economic growth leads to the ultimate destruction of land and water?

  • What will you do in the legislature to honour the intent of the Lands Protection Act?

  • What will you do in the legislature to stop land grabbing in P.E.I.?

  • What will you do in the legislature to reverse the unscrupulous land transactions?

  • What will you do in the legislature to reverse the damage already done to the land by unacceptable farming practices?

The Coalition for the Protection of P.E.I. Lands and our associates will be watching for a rapid response in the print, electronic and social media. Islanders deserve to hear your answers. We will watch with interest how the new MLA takes up the role as a serious legislator for the land in the fall session of the P.E.I. legislative assembly.

Marie Burge is a member of Cooper Institute which is an organizational member of the P.E.I. Coalition for the Protection of P.E.I. Lands.

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Here is a link to a map of District 10:Charlottetown-Winsloe, from Elections PEI: https://www.electionspei.ca/sites/www.electionspei.ca/files/NewDistrict10.pdf


Sounds interesting:
From The (other) U.K. Guardian, a half-hour podcast on trusting the polls in the U.S. presidential race:
https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2020/oct/22/us-election-2020-can-we-trust-the-polls-podcast?


Some opera video streaming:

Mozart’s Così fan tutte, tonight until 6:30PM
Starring Amanda Majeski, Serena Malfi, Kelli O’Hara, Ben Bliss, Adam Plachetka, and Christopher Maltman, conducted by David Robertson. From March 31, 2018.

Rossini’s La Cenerentola, tonight 7:30PM until about 6:30PM Friday
Starring Cecilia Bartoli, Ramón Vargas, Simone Alaimo, and Alessandro Corbelli. From October 27, 1997. A classic!!


Global Chorus essay for October 22
Robert Sandford


Beyond population growth and its unanticipated effects, the greatest threat humanity presently faces is a changing planetary climate. With warming mean global temperatures, our planet’s atmosphere holds more water vapour and becomes more turbulent. Extreme weather events are becoming more common everywhere. Droughts are becoming longer, deeper and more frequent, and intense rainfalls are causing extraordinary damage and great human suffering around the world.

People everywhere want to know whether we can turn these problems around while they are still more or less linear and incremental, before the world begins to change all at once. Others worry about hope for their children. They want to know if there is hope for the unborn, which is to say intergenerational hope.

Hopelessness emerges directly from helplessness. Much current hopelessness comes from the recognition that our political systems are not designed and structured in such a way that would easily allow them to be capable of addressing issues of this magnitude. The scales are all wrong. While political systems are designed to function within limited, often competing, jurisdictions over timeframes of four or five years, the problems we have created for ourselves span generations and encompass not just nations but the entire globe. Many don’t believe it is possible to rescue our political systems from the influence of vested economic and ideological interests and the self-referential focus of party politics in time to prevent collapse of important elements of the Earth system.

So where do we go now? Firstly, it is important to realize that a storm is coming. This is not the time to throw up our hands in helpless despair. The sky is not falling and the world is not coming to an end. But the problems we face are real and substantial, so we need to act decisively. If we are to adapt, we cannot permit ourselves to be made to feel helpless. If there was ever a time in history that demanded personal courage, inspired citizenship and thoughtful and persistent leadership action, it is now.

     — Robert Sandford, EPCOR Chair of the Canadian Partnership Initiative in support of the United Nations “Water for Life” Decade

The "Winston Churchill of Water":
http://www.rwsandford.ca/
  ----------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 21, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Two Legislative Committee meetings today:

Special Committee on Poverty is meeting in camera at 10:30AM to discuss its report to the Legislature
------------------------
Health and Social Development Committee, 1:30PM,
viewable online.

Topic: Home care and long-term care during the pandemic

The committee will hear three presentations:

  • Island EMS (Matthew Cudmore)

  • PEI Seniors Homes (Bob Nutbrown) with the MacLeod Cares (Wayne McMillan, Ramsay Duff)

  • Home Instead Senior Care (David McMillan)

Legislative Assembly Websire:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/

Legislative Assembly Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg
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This afternoon:
Farm Centre, Legacy Garden Fall Sale, 2-5:30PM, Farm Centre parking lot, 420 University Avenue.
"We will have fabulous veggies and our new tea, as well as Fall, Halloween, and Christmas crafts!
*and $10 off wreaths*"
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Coming up later this week:
Saturday, October 24th:
Nature Walk in Stratford with the Stratford Greens (District 5/6), 1:30-3PM, Fullerton Creek Conservation Park.
Join us for a fun, informative walk in the woods to learn about the various trees and shrubs that make up the Park.

It will also be an opportunity to chat with Green Party Leader Peter Bevan-Baker and District 5 MLA Michele Beaton as well as members of the Coordinating Committee of the District 5/6 Regional Association of the Green Party of PEI.

WHAT: Nature Walk with the Stratford Greens, with Michele Beaton and Peter Bevan-Baker

WHEN: Saturday, October 24, 1:30pm-3:00pm (rain date Oct 25)

WHERE: Fullerton Creek Conservation Park

COVID-19 protocols will be in place during the event. Please wear a mask and socially distance when appropriate. Hand sanitizer will be available

This is at the same time as the:
PR Vision 2020 and Beyond -- an online forum with Willie Sullivan from Scotland, 2PM, register (and should be available to view later) at THIS LINK
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Sunday, October 25th:
(City of Charlottetown Residents)
Curbside Giveaway Day

On Sunday, October 25, place your unwanted, reusable items on the curbside in front of your home
Ensure items are disinfected prior to placing on the curb
Mark the items you place along the curb with a sign that says 'FREE'
Remove all unclaimed items by sundown on October 25
When hunting for treasures:

Maintain physical distancing and any other requirements dictated by PEI's Chief Public Health Office
Respect private property
Only take items that are marked as 'FREE'
Obey traffic laws - don't block traffic or driveways
Disinfect any items you pick up prior to taking them into your home
Guidelines for items placed on the curb:

Items must be reusable
Items should not be at risk of containing bed bugs (e.g. bedding, mattresses, soft furniture)
Items should be in good, usable condition
Follow the guidelines set by the federal government regarding items safe for selling at garage sale.
What to do with unclaimed items?

Consult Island Waste Management Corporation's (IWMC) Interactive Sorting Guide for disposal instructions
Donate items to a charitable organization or thrift store
Post your item for sale on an online platform such as Kijiji or Facebook Marketplace

More details on the week's City of Charlottetown Waste Reduction activities:
https://www.charlottetown.ca/environment___sustainability/sustainability/programs_and_initiatives/waste_reduction_week


As scant on details as this is, it is goal-setting on a public stage, and Islanders can thank a robust Official Opposition for putting forth many of these ideals and pushing Government to get to the next stage. https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/pei-government-aims-for-2040-climate-target-but-offers-few-details-on-how-to-reach-it-511541/

P.E.I. government aims for 2040 climate target, but offers few details on how to reach it - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

Premier Dennis King is hoping P.E.I. can reduce its climate emissions to net zero by 2040.

In an announcement at UPEI’s Sustainable Design Engineering building on Tuesday, King said he plans to make P.E.I. the first province in Canada to reach net zero emissions. 

A framework document presented at the announcement defined net zero to mean the province would produce “no more [greenhouse gases] than our land, ocean and technologies can absorb.” 

The document says the province would achieve these savings by both reducing emissions and offsetting emissions but included no details which method would provide for the majority of emissions reductions. The document also included no details on the estimated cost of reducing these emissions.

"We need to be creative, we need to be bold and we need to be collaborative," King said.  "Over the next 10 years, we will reduce our reliance on imported fossil fuels and increase renewable energy use."

The federal government has set a target of reaching net zero nationally by 2050. In spring 2019, P.E.I.’s legislature passed a target of reducing emissions by 40 per cent from 2005 levels by 2030. The amended targets were introduced by the Opposition Greens.

Myers said he wants to see all electric power used on P.E.I. derived from renewable sources by 2030.

He touted the recently announced plans to replace Sherwood Elementary School using net zero emission plans. The replacement will cost $23 million. All future school construction projects will involve net zero design, Myers said. 

The province also plans to electrify its fleet of vehicles. 

But Myers also acknowledged that there were many unknowns to the plan. He did not specify interim targets for reducing emissions from transportation – the biggest source of GHGs on P.E.I. — by 2025 or 2030.

"The actual answer, we don't have at this point. But we plan to have that plan in place," Myers said.

King acknowledged carbon pricing will be a part of plans to reduce emissions but offered no specifics on how much pricing might increase. Negotiations with the federal government are ongoing. 

King also downplayed the timing of the announcement, held two weeks before a high-stakes byelection in Charlottetown-Winsloe.

“I understand that many in the media look for these types of connections,” King said.

He said departments have been working on climate plans for nine months. He said the mandate letter for Minister Myers included specific directions on this.

Jameson, the minister whose ministerial mandate letter included the most specific references to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, did not speak during Tuesday’s announcement and left as media questions were being asked. 

Jameson’s department will not be leading the 2040 net zero effort. The province’s lead staffer on the effort will be Derek Ellis from the Department of Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy. 

Robert Henderson, the Liberal critic for Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy, said he had no criticisms of the premier’s “lofty goals,” but also noted the dearth of details.

"How do you achieve that? And really this document has nothing on that," Henderson said.

Henderson also suggested the timing of the announcement raised questions.

Green Opposition Leader Peter Bevan-Baker also welcomed the goal of net zero by 2040. But he also pointed to lack of concrete policies and initiatives to achieve these targets. 

"I don't think there's a target that anybody has hit going back to the 1980s when climate change was first recognized as an issue," Bevan-Baker said.  "Targets are useful. But alone they obviously do nothing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

Bevan-Baker also said the timing of Tuesday’s press conference, coupled with the lack of concrete spending commitments, raised his eyebrows.  "That does raise that spectre of was this largely political theatre," Bevan-Baker said.

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CBC article on public input requested (Link Only):
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-net-zero-energy-consumption-1.5769317


Some Opera Offerings

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Renée Fleming, Kelli O’Hara, Nathan Gunn, Alek Shrader, and Thomas Allen, conducted by Sir Andrew Davis. From January 17, 2015.

Mozart’s Così fan tutte, tonight 7:30PM until Thursday about 6:30PM
Starring Amanda Majeski, Serena Malfi, Kelli O’Hara, Ben Bliss, Adam Plachetka, and Christopher Maltman, conducted by David Robertson. From March 31, 2018. Mozart set at Coney Island :-)


Global Chorus essay for October 21
Annette Saliken


To survive on this planet, I believe humanity needs a framework for decision-making that guides us toward innovation and prosperity, without burdening future generations and threatening our existence. I envision an “endurance framework” comprised of thoughtful questions carefully designed to lead us to better choices. These self-queries would prioritize our economic, environmental and social needs to help us make decisions that reflect what is most important to us as a society.

This endurance framework would apply to everyday choices in households, companies and governments. For example, at home we might ask, will my decision have a positive or negative impact on the financial, environmental and social well-being of my family? How will it affect these same needs of my children and grand children? What will be the affect on my neighbours? For businesses, since they typically have a mandate to maximize shareholder wealth, we as shareholders should demand them to use an endurance framework with questions forming a more balanced mandate, such as: how will this decision help our firm meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets? How will it affect the social well-being of our employees, their families and the community? For governments, the endurance framework could be used in the development of laws requiring them to address each of the questions as part of their legislative process: how will this resolution impact the economic, ecological and social well-being of our citizens? Will it compromise these same needs of future generations? What effect will it have on our global community, including other countries, their people, and other species?

If society can make the paradigm shift from traditional money-first thinking to an endurance framework for decision-making, then I believe we can create the conditions necessary to survive on this planet. This does not mean we should stop seeking economic growth or sacrifice our creature comforts; rather, it means we need to refocus on a more balanced, sustainable decision-making process. I believe we can work together successfully in this way to ensure the endurance and well-being of humanity on this planet for this generation and those to come.

     — Annette Saliken, author of Cocktail Party Guide to Global Warming and Cocktail Party Guide to Green Energy

  -------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean

copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 20, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

"There is reason for hope that the actions we take now  -- this decade, this century -- will be regarded by those who follow as a positive turning point, a flashpoint in geological time when humankind became aware of the reality:
we are a part of nature, not apart from it."


        ---  cinematographer Adam Ravetch, Arctic Bear Productions
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Events:
Local Food ordering deadline:
Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup: https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/

Standing Committee Meeting:
Public Accounts Committee, 9:30AM, online.

Topic: Implementation of audit recommendations on Office of the Public Trustee (2017) and Maintenance Enforcement Program (2016)

The committee will meet to receive a briefing on implementation of the Auditor General’s 2017 recommendations on the Office of the Public Trustee, and a further update on implementation of 2016 recommendations on the Maintenance Enforcement Program, by Karen MacDonald, Acting Deputy Minister; and Clare Henderson, Director of Family Law and Court Services, of the Department of Justice and Public Safety.

The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public. The meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page.
Legislative Assembly website
PEI Legislature Facebook page

Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 21st, 2020:
Farm Centre Legacy Garden sale, 2-5:30PM, back parking lot, Farm Centre, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown
"We will have fabulous veggies and our new tea, as well as Fall, Halloween, and Christmas crafts! In fact, all wreaths will be $10.00 off! See you then!"

Sale will include:

-Garlic ($20 for 1 pound, $40 for 2 pounds, $50 for 3 pounds)

-Tomatoes: Roma and Mountain Merit ($1.50 per pound)

-Tomato Seconds ($1.00 per pound)

-Green Tomatoes ($1.00 per pound)

-Onions ($2.00 per pound)

-Cabbage ($3.00 per head)

-Legacy Apples ($2.00 per pound)

-Asian Pears ($2.00 per pound)

-Hardy Kiwis ($7.00/pint)

-Tomatillos ($2.00 per pound)

-Winter squash: butternut, acorn, kabocha... ($2.00 per pound)

-Dried herbs: Basil, parsley, sage ($3.00 per 20g)

-Crafts (Various Prices)


Atlantic Skies for October 19th-25th, 2020

by Glenn K. Roberts  

Celestial Conjunctions

We will skip any discussion of grammatical conjunctions, and, instead, discuss celestial conjunctions. A celestial conjunction is when two objects in the solar system (e.g., two planets, or the Moon and a planet) or one object in the solar system and a more distant object (e.g., a planet and a star) have the same right ascension (the angular distance of a particular point measured eastward along the celestial equator from the Sun at the March equinox to the reference point) or the same ecliptic longitude (a positive measurement , from 0-360 degrees, eastwards along the ecliptic plane).

As mentioned in last week's column, the planet Mercury will reach inferior solar conjunction on Oct. 25. This means that Mercury will pass close to the Sun, and between Earth and the Sun (as viewed from Earth) on that date. If Mercury were to pass directly across the disk of the Sun (as seen from Earth), it would be referred to as a "transit". Mercury and Venus are the only two planets in our solar system that can have inferior solar conjunctions and transits, as they are the only two planets with orbits between Earth and the Sun. A superior conjunction occurs when a celestial object (e.g., planet), whose orbit lies outside another object's orbit, passes behind a much larger object (e.g., the Sun) as viewed from the observer's point of reference (e.g., Earth). The superior planets in our solar system are Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto (with reference to Earth), and are all capable of having a superior solar conjunction. Earth would be considered a superior planet if you were standing on Mercury or Venus.

Once Mercury reaches inferior solar conjunction on the 25th, it will transition from an evening object to a morning object (around Oct. 29). Venus (mag. -4.04) is still a pre-dawn object, rising around 4:20 a.m., and reaching an altitude of 29 degrees above the eastern horizon before fading from view as dawn breaks around 7:20 a.m. Mars (mag. -2.5), having passed opposition on the 13th, is visible 7 degrees above the eastern horizon by about 7 p.m., reaching its highest altitude of 48 degrees above the southern horizon around 12:35 a.m., before disappearing in the western, pre-dawn sky around 6:10 a.m., when it drops below 8 degrees above the horizon. Jupiter (mag. -2.3) and Saturn (mag. +0.55) remain early evening objects, with Jupiter visible 21 degrees above the southern horizon around 6:40 p.m., followed by Saturn 22 degrees above the southern horizon around 6:55 p.m. Neither planet manages to get any higher in the sky before they both disappear from view in the southwest sky by 10 p.m. and 10:10 p.m. respectively. Watch for the near half-full Moon, Jupiter and Saturn to form a triangle in the southern sky on the evening of Oct. 22, with Jupiter to the right of the Moon, and Saturn above. (great photo op).

The Orion meteor shower (radiant in the constellation of Orion - the Hunter) peaks during the midnight - dawn hours of Oct.21. Expect about 20+ meteors per hour during the peak, under a dark sky away from city lights once your eyes have dark-adapted (30-45 mins).

Until next week, clear skies.

Events:

Oct. 21 - Orion meteor shower peak (midnight-dawn)

       22 - Moon-Jupiter-Saturn triangle in southern evening sky

       23 - First Quarter Moon
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Some opera video streaming:

Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Joyce DiDonato, Juan Diego Flórez, Peter Mattei, John Del Carlo, and John Relyea, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From March 24, 2007.  The Barber of Seville is so mad-cap, down to the Figaro's barber's mad-cap....

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, tonight 7:30PM until about 6:30PM Wednesday
Starring Renée Fleming, Kelli O’Hara, Nathan Gunn, Alek Shrader, and Thomas Allen, conducted by Sir Andrew Davis. From January 17, 2015.  Superb performance, of course, by Renee Fleming.


Global Chorus essay for October 20 
Adam Ravetch


I know there is much concern about the environment and our natural world. I, myself, have seen much change over the last two decades in the Arctic. But even as the planet shifts and changes, I can’t help to stop, if only for a moment, to admire what we have.

I feel fortunate to be part of an amazing generation of wildlife documentarians that have made an incredible contribution to how the world views Nature.

And in the last 50 years, a select group of cinematographers working in some of the world’s most inhospitable places on our planet are responsible for a phenomenal natural history archive of how we see and understand our planet today.

So what is its value as we move forward? What purpose does it serve? How does this remarkable effort help us, if at all, as we head into a future of uncertainty?

As our population grows and expands, the amount of natural lands will most likely reduce, and the consumption of our natural resources will increase, which will put more pressure on all living things. As a society, we will be faced with huge decisions just to ensure our own survival on this planet. And for wildlife, future generations will have to decide which animals to protect and which to let go.

But for these future leaders, they are lucky to not be alone. At their fingertips will be a rich and detailed natural history archive; a chamber of wise consults to support them – voices of the passionate caretakers of wildlife, whose determination and single-minded focus produced imagery that gave us all a better understanding and knowledge of the amazing wild life of our planet. It is truly inspirational, and will hopefully inform our future citizens to allow them to realize that what is really unique and important about this planet is LIFE itself !

Today, there are more cameras and cinematographers in the wild then ever before, and I for one am encouraged about the future, knowing that the world is watching!

     — Adam Ravetch, wildlife cinematographer and filmmaker, National Geographic’s Arctic Tale, Disneynature’s Earth, IMAX’s To the Arctic and Arctic Bear Productions’ Ice Bear 3D
 

http://www.arcticbearproductions.com/adam-ravetch.html
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essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 19, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Order deadline for local food options this week:
OrganicVeggieDeliver, order by tonight for Friday delivery.  Info at: https://www.organicveggiedelivery.com/
Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup: https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/
Eat Local PEI -- Online Farmers' Market order by Wednesday midnight for Saturday pickup/delivery: https://www.localline.ca/eatlocalpei


It's Waste Reduction Week in Canada, and we can all share the City of Charlottetown's information, plans and (some of their) events, put together by their deeply committed Environment and Sustainability people:
https://www.charlottetown.ca/environment___sustainability/sustainability/programs_and_initiatives/waste_reduction_week


Met Opera video-streaming:
Comedies!

Donizetti’s Don Pasquale, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecień, and John Del Carlo. From November 13, 2010.

Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia, tonight 7:30PM until Tuesday 6:30PM
Starring Joyce DiDonato, Juan Diego Flórez, Peter Mattei, John Del Carlo, and John Relyea, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From March 24, 2007.
Slightly similar plots!


The slowflowers idea, expanded by Seattle-based and October 19 Global Chorus essayist Debra Prinzing, has blossomed in the years since she wrote the contribution (below). 
Debra's home page and blog:
https://www.debraprinzing.com/

Some producers and their gorgeous designs:

https://slowflowers.com/


And we have some incredible flower grower and arrangers here, including Isobel's Flowers (also at the Charlottetown Farmers' Market), Vanessa at V's Flower FarmIsland Meadow Farms, and others.  Lovely Fall table centrepieces and wreaths and Christmas greens just around the corner, so support local flower growers, too.


Global Chorus essay for October 19 
Debra Prinzing


It feels daunting to think one person can change things in this world. That is when I turn from the macro to the micro and focus on individual action. A single gesture takes on meaning far greater than me, my family, my block, my neighbourhood, my city. When that gesture is frequently repeated, its impact is exponential.

I have always turned to flowers, those growing in my garden and in the fields of my flower farmer friends.

The symbolic gesture of giving flowers has been practised for generations. Flowers appear in history, in literature, in every culture and in every land. Gathering flowers as a show of affection or a celebratory display is no small thing. It is a timeless, universal practice.

Flowers connect humans with Nature and heighten our awareness of the seasons. They root us to our place on the planet. Our senses see, smell, touch (and even hear and taste) botanical beauty. This is a truth understood by all humans.

I do believe that flowers parallel food. We don’t often eat petals and buds, but they feed us nonetheless. Te spiritual sustenance of flowers has caused me to think more intentionally about how I consume them. I have been inspired to start the Slow Flowers movement, a conscious practice of sourcing flowers grown close to me rather than ones shipped to me from afar. When I choose local flowers, I am preserving farmland, ensuring economic development in rural areas and keeping farm jobs viable.

As an advocate for those who grow flowers enjoyed by so many, I believe it’s important to remember the human toil required to plant, cultivate and harvest those blooms. I find hope in honouring the flower farmer, hearing his or her story and acknowledging the farmer’s role in bringing beauty into our lives. By making a simple connection between flower and farmer we humanize an entire industry, one that has previously been so disconnected from us. It is perhaps more indirectly rather than directly world changing, and yet, it is the act I know makes a difference far beyond the vase on my dining table.

     — Debra Prinzing, author, speaker, designer, founder of Slowflowers.com

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essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 18, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

The news from New Zealand, and the tone of the Global Chorus essay are good to keep in mind as other politicians and such seems to dominate the airwaves.  (Consider limiting the bombastic aspects of the news entering your space for the next few weeks.)


A news story with good background, and a reminder that New Zealand appears to be functioning well with a Mixed- Member Proportional Representation system https://www.reuters.com/article/newzealand-election-int-idUSKBN2720Q0

New Zealand's Ardern wins 'historic' re-election for crushing COVID-19 - Reuters News Service article by Praveen Menon

Published on Reuters News Service on Saturday, October 17th, 2020

WELLINGTON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern delivered the biggest election victory for her centre-left Labour Party in half a century on Saturday as voters rewarded her for a decisive response to COVID-19.

The mandate means Ardern, 40, could form the first single-party government in decades and will face the challenge of delivering on the progressive transformation she promised but failed to deliver in her first term, where Labour shared power with a nationalist party.

“This is a historic shift,” said political commentator Bryce Edwards of Victoria University in Wellington, describing the vote as one of the biggest swings in New Zealand’s electoral history in 80 years.

Labour was on track to win 64 of the 120 seats in the country’s unicameral parliament, the highest by any party since New Zealand adopted a proportional voting system in 1996.

Ardern, 40, promised supporters she would build an economy that works for everyone, create jobs, train people, protect the environment and address climate challenges and social inequalities.

“We are living in an increasingly polarised world,” she said. “A place where more and more have lost the ability to see one another’s point of view. I hope that with this election, New Zealand has shown that this is not who we are.”

Opposition National Party leader Judith Collins said she congratulated the prime minister for an “outstanding result”.

Labour had 49.0% of the votes, far ahead of National at 27%, the Electoral Commission said, with 95% of ballots counted.

Ardern said she would wait until the final result to say if her government would include smaller groups like the Green Party, a former coalition partner that secured a bigger 8% mandate.

VOTERS SWING

National leaders were decimated in their strongholds by young Labour candidates who appealed to voters with progressive, democratic messages, and highlighted the party’s success in beating coronavirus.

“The last seven months of this government, all of the issues around their past promises have been put aside because of COVID-19. It’s that simple,” said Deputy National leader Gerry Brownlee who lost his long-held seat.

Despite the election’s tilt to the left, Ardern “is likely to continue to chart a centrist course, largely aiming to implement incremental change that she hopes will outlast a future change in government,” because she owes her victory to centre-right voters who previously supported National, said Geoffrey Miller, analyst at political website Democracy Project.

‘BE STRONG, BE KIND’

The prime minister won global acclaim for her handling of a mass shooting last year by a white supremacist in Christchurch, with her inclusive “be strong, be kind” mantra and swift action to ban guns.

She burnished that reputation this year with a “go hard, go early” approach to the new coronavirus, which has eliminated locally spread COVID-19 in the nation.

The election was delayed by a month after new COVID-19 infections in Auckland that led to a second lockdown in the country’s largest city.

While known internationally for promoting progressive causes such as woman’s rights and social justice, at home Ardern faced criticism that her government failed on a promise to be transformational.

Life is back to normal in New Zealand, but its borders are still shut, its tourism sector is bleeding and economists predict a lasting recession after the harsh lockdowns.

The economy shrank at an 12.2% annual clip in the second quarter, its steepest drop since the Great Depression. Debt is forecast to rise to 56% of gross domestic product from less than 20% before the pandemic.

New Zealanders also voted on Saturday in referendums to legalise euthanasia and recreational marijuana, with results to be announced on Oct. 30. The latter vote could make New Zealand only the third country in the world to allow the adult use and sale of cannabis nationwide, after Uruguay and Canada.

-30-


Opera corner - the tragic and comic as "Donizetti Week" concludes

Donizetti’s Roberto Devereux, tonight until 6:30PM
Starring Sondra Radvanovsky, Elīna Garanča, Matthew Polenzani, and Mariusz Kwiecień, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From April 16, 2016.   Probably some liberties with history as Elizabeth I deals with her monarchy and her private life.  Excellent cast,  and it's not too much of a spoiler to say it does not end happily.  2 hours 40 minutes

Donizetti’s Don Pasquale, tonight 7:30PM until Monday about 6:30PM
Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecień, and John Del Carlo.   From November 13, 2010.   This is the version where Anna Netrebko is beyond dynamic, literally jumping up and down on the furniture to get her point across.  Not too much of a spoiler to say that All ends well. 2 hours 20 minutes


Global Chorus essay for October 18
David Kahane


My work involves convening citizens to deliberate about climate change and climate policy. Whatever life and political perspectives people bring to the table, they hear each other, dig deeply into their own priorities and values, and grapple together with tough choices. They show the collective wisdom and care that humans can generate, person to person.

Are these human capacities enough to deal with global environmental and social crises? I don’t know. I often doubt it. Our political, economic and cultural systems tend to cut us of from the effects of our actions, insulate us from the suffering of other beings, and lead us to pursue short-term rewards even when these compromise what we care about most deeply. These systems churn along, seemingly relentless.

I’m interested in what happens if we give up hope as well as the reactivity and despair that are its flip side. What happens if we act with fearlessness and integrity and compassion – not because we’re convinced these can turn the tide, but simply because they reflect who we are and aspire to be? We can do this as a personal practice: cultivating a sense of our own basic goodness, the goodness of others, and of human society. Being as present as we can to our bodies, our emotions, our interactions, the phenomenal world. Passionately connecting with our everyday lives: eating, dressing, gardening, cooking, washing dishes, walking, working. Recognizing our tendencies to dissociate and to dull out, and shifting these.

We can do this in our social and political lives too: weaving relationships and projects that reflect real human interconnection and mutual concern, that wear away our habits of fear and aggression, that draw upon our deepest intelligence to cease harming and support healing.

Will these shifts create the conditions necessary for human survival and the survival of other species? My questions back: how would we know, and why does it matter? At worst, the relationships and structures and personal capacities that we build will increase our courage and resilience as the world slides toward catastrophe. At worst, we will tap into some real human dignity and joy in the time we have left.

      — David Kahane, professor of political science at University of Alberta, director of Alberta Climate Dialogue


https://www.artsrn.ualberta.ca/environmental-studies/scholars-profiles/david-kahane/

not this David Kahane (1903-1998), who was a Polish-Jewish religious teacher and doctor of philosophy, and Chief Rabbi of the Polish Army.
--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 17, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Farmers' Markets in Charlottetown (8-1PM -- outside) and Summerside (9AM-1PM -- INSIDE)
----------------------
This afternoon:

"Tour de D10"  (Bike Rally for Green Party Candidate Chris van Ouwerkerk), 3:30-5PM, meet at Cody Banks Arena (Maple Avenue in Sherwood).

"Join us with your bikes, friends and family for a bike ride in the southern parts of District 10 Charlottetown-Winsloe, where there is currently a provincial by-election happening and the Green Party candidate is Chris van Ouwerkerk!

Rally at Cody Banks Arena from 3:30-3:45.

We'll target a slow ride through the Sherwood neighbourhoods of District 10, returning to the arena around 5:00pm.

Remember to show your gratitude to any candidate you meet!"

Helmets required (if you're to be on a bike) and physical distancing protocols to be followed.

Next Saturday, October 24th:
PR Vision 2020 and Beyond, 2PM, webinar.

Islanders for Proportional Representation (IPR) is hosting an interactive online forum. The event will mark eighteen months since the 2019 Referendum which has revealed a growing consensus that Islanders want electoral democracy in the form of Proportional Representation (PR) for PEI.

Keynote speaker for the forum will be Willie Sullivan of the Scottish branch of Electoral Reform Society who is deeply involved in establishing Proportional Representation in Scotland. He will speak about how PR is working in Scotland, how difficulties are being addressed, and how a great many of people’s fears about PR are proving to be unfounded. To register:

https://us02web.zoom.us/.../reg.../WN_CfXupuEASQuNa2rEmM8s_Q


Article: https://nbmediacoop.org/2020/10/11/what-drought-the-worst-drought-new-brunswick-has-seen-in-decades/

from the New Brunswick Media Co-Op:

What drought? The worst drought New Brunswick has seen in decades - nbmediacoop.org post by Drew Gilbert

Published on Sunday, October 11th, 2020

Did you notice the colours of the leaves changed earlier than usual this year? If you went to pick apples this season, they came earlier as well. The reason? Not frost, but one of the worst droughts on record. May to July saw a tenth of the average rainfall. July had some rain to water the forests, but not enough to fill the rivers. Water tables across the province have continued to drop because although August and September were average in temperature only a quarter of the average rain fell. Ours is a drought that nobody discusses.

I look at the world a little differently because I studied geology, glaciation, and hydrology. Maybe you never noticed the little rain we got this summer because it was so lovely that you didn’t think about it. But I did.

While we went about our summer activities, the rivers ran dry, the water tables dropped, and the people who get their water from wells have been worried or are already out of water. Over 300,000 people get water from wells across New Brunswick. The abnormally low water tables have impacted many of these well water users. 


from the article  (go to link for better resolution)

<SNIP>

What can we do in New Brunswick?

Stop clearcutting. Forests breathe air and water through transpiration, and their presence brings about localized rainfall. A rainforest is, well, a rainforest precisely because of the trees. I have family who live near a property on the Canaan Watershed that was clearcut on a large scale. While rains do come locally, each time the water missed their property, by a few kilometres. Eventually, the loss was so great that they lost their well water. This localized drought was no coincidence, but rather it was caused by the disruption of the local evaporation cycles due to the clearcut. Clearcutting and the monoculture forest policies in our province take water from all living creatures, be they animals, plants, and humans.

Shade the watershed. In the Nashwaak Valley where I live, the river has been so low, the lowest that I have seen in 13 years, and the water temperature has risen. With the water levels so low, fish cannot hide in the cooler, deeper waters. When much effort has been put into saving the Atlantic Salmon, little attention has been given to an activity that could help the most—keeping the river shaded by trees. Salmon become stressed when the temperatures rise over 20 degrees Celsius, and they stop feeding. Temperatures as high as 27 degrees Celsius in salmon-bearing habitats were recorded at Durham Bridge this summer by the Nashwaak Watershed Association.

Don’t till the soil. The amount of carbon dioxide emissions caused by over tilling is one of the leading causes of greenhouse gas emissions. Bare soils dry and are at a greater risk of erosion because of wind and heavy rains. For example, the Dust Bowl that led to the Great Depression was caused by generations of over-tilling. At the same time, the Rodale Institute offers a wealth of information on alternatives to till.

Manage your woodlot to create and maintain healthy riparian zones on the edges of rivers by planting trees and by rebuilding damaged soils.

Take the opportunity to build momentum, to save forests, to grow the watershed, and to keep drought from becoming a permanent part of our lives.

Don’t give up; we need you.

Drew Gilbert lives in Taymouth, New Brunswick, where he is an enthusiast in renewable energy.

-30-

Thanks to Tony Reddin for passing along this article and others.


Saturday and Sunday opera:

Radio:
Saturday afternoon, with Ben Heppner, 1PM, 104.7FM

Best Opera Ever Series:
Joshua Hopkins presents Thaïs by Jules Massenet
with Sir Andrew Davis, conductor; Joshua Hopkins, Athanael; Erin Wall, Thais; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, recorded in 2019, and reviewed here:
https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/massenet-tha-s-davis
and it's the one with the "Meditation" piece between scenes in Act II that is a familiar and beautiful violin piece. Wikipedia entry and clip
 
Video streaming: Metropolitan Opera:
Part II and III of the English

Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Elza van den Heever, Joyce DiDonato, Matthew Polenzani, Joshua Hopkins, and Matthew Rose, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From January 19, 2013.
Donizetti’s Roberto Devereux, 7:30PM until 6:30PM Sunday
Starring Sondra Radvanovsky, Elīna Garanča, Matthew Polenzani, and Mariusz Kwiecień, conducted by Maurizio Benini. From April 16, 2016.

The last two of the "Three Tudor Queens" operas of Donizetti.


Global Chorus essay for October 17 
Tami Simon


What matters most is our motivation. If we orient ourselves towards a motivation that is based on an awakened heart, then whatever the outcome of our efforts, we can rest in the assurance that we have done our very best as human beings and as a species.

So what does it mean be motivated by an awakened heart? To me, it means aligning ourselves with the good of the whole, with the deep heart that feels our interconnection with all of life, the sensitive heart that breathes with and is in communion with the flow of life itself. When we drop into this deep, pulsing heart, a heart that is not defended in any way but is acutely sensitive to the relational field and the needs of the moment, there is a natural desire to be of benefit and to serve the good of the whole. Can we continually return to this true heart and reconnect with our deepest motivation to serve all beings, again and again and again?

If so, we become a living heart-fire of love and justice in the world. This heart-fire is contagious; others will catch it when they hear our warm voice or touch our sensitive hands or see our kind face. We become an indestructible human torch of goodness. This is not an idea but something that needs to be deeply felt and embodied. If we can embody this motivation in our life and in our moment-to-moment actions, then we can join together and creatively solve whatever environmental or social problems we face.

The fire of the human heart can never be extinguished. It burns brightly in the face of any and every challenge. Te open, tender, creative human heart is our best refuge and hope.

    —Tami Simon, founder and publisher of Sounds True

https://www.soundstrue.com/pages/our-vision/

--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 16, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Fridays for Future, 4PM, outside Province House, Charlottetown.
Facebook event details


You can catch up on Standing Committee meetings this week, from the P.E.I. Legislative Assembly website:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/index.php/committees

or their Facebook page, where the links and clips are right there...:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg


Notice: https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/lifestyles/local-lifestyles/opportunity-to-apply-for-2020-hilda-ramsay-student-award-509243/

Opportunity to apply for 2020 Hilda Ramsay Student Award - The Guardian

Published on Thursday, October 15th, 2020

In the employment turmoil of 2020, both students and parents can worry about financing the upcoming term in post-secondary education. 

One option is to take advantage of awards and bursaries such as the NDP P.E.I. Women's Committee's recently created Hilda Ramsay award valued at $500. The award is granted annually to a female identified student who is pursuing study at UPEI or Holland College.

The deadline to apply for the Hilda Ramsay Award is Nov. 1. The application is online on the NDP P.E.I. website and the UPEI and Holland College websites.

“This year is especially difficult for students struggling financially, and NDP women want to help female students in this way,” says Susan MacVittie, chairwoman, NDP P.E.I. Women's Committee. “The difficulty is heightened this year due to the impact of the pandemic on women's employment. As well, Black, Indigenous and people of colour and those with disabilities face added hurdles to employment and income.”

In 1951, Ramsay of Indian River, P.E.I., became the first woman to run for a seat in the legislative assembly of P.E.I. She represented the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), later renamed the New Democratic Party (NDP).

As a community minded person, Ramsay served as provincial president of the Women’s Institute, the Catholic Women’s League and the Island Drama Festival and was a recognized actress and winner of a Canadian Drama Award.

Preference will be given to a student in financial need with a demonstrated interest in social justice, women/diversity studies, Indigenous, environmental studies, political studies or trades.

-30-

NDP PEI website:
https://www.ndppei.ca/


Notice:
The Indemnities and Allowances Commission is meeting to consider remuneration for Members of the Legislative Assembly and invites the public to submit their views in writing to:
Indemnities and Allowances Commission
c/o Office of the Clerk
197 Richmond Street
PO Box 2000
Charlottetown, PEl C1A 7N8
Fax: 902-368-5175
assembly@assembly.pe.ca

by Friday, October 30, 2020.


Opera notes -- part of the English Opera trio by Donizetti

Donizetti’s Anna Bolena, tonight until 6:30PM
Starring Anna Netrebko, Ekaterina Gubanova, Tamara Mumford, Stephen Costello, and Ildar Abdrazakov, conducted by Marco Armiliato. From October 15, 2011.

Donizetti’s Maria Stuarda, 7:30PM tonight until Saturday 6:30PM
"Joyce DiDonato gives a sensational performance as Mary, Queen of Scots, in Donizetti’s bel canto drama, opposite Elza van den Heever as Queen Elizabeth. This Live in HD presentation of David McVicar’s acclaimed 2012 production also stars Matthew Polenzani as Leicester, the man caught between the rival queens. Maurizio Benini conducts." From January 19, 2013.


Global Chorus essay for October 16 
Don McKay


Let me point to a pair of benefits of the environmental crisis – paradoxical benefits, to be sure – but apparent just the same in the remarkable shifts we can observe in the general mindset regarding the environment. One is the new-found sense of its losability – the awareness that natural elements we took for granted (e.g., dependable sea levels, seasonal regularity, arable land) are subject to radical, perhaps catastrophic, change. Losability leads us to value what we’ve got when – to adapt Joni Mitchell – it’s not quite gone, much as we do when a friend or relative contracts a serious illness. It’s a sad irony that astonishment and attachment increase when that black frame settles around a species, a landscape or a place.

The second, related shift in our thinking could be called a sense of membership. As the truths of ecology gather and gain acceptance (a long process, it has to be admitted, given that it’s a 19th-century idea) our idea of ourselves shifts from the notion of the Master Species at the summit of a hierarchical order to that of a member of a system that works as a vast web of interdependencies. Membership in the natural world has already brought us fresh insights into its intricacies, its amazing symbioses and networks of communication. Of course, membership includes the recognition that we have often damaged and destroyed parts of the ecological web, and put its very existence – at least in its current life-enhancing form – in jeopardy.

As the official name for our epoch becomes accepted as the Anthropocene, we will implicitly acknowledge the role of anthropos – us – in altering the planet’s systems sufficiently that a geological record will be left. Simultaneously, we will position ourselves as inhabitants of deep time rather than a shallow, human-centred history. Membership and losability: these gifs will mean that, to whatever extent we are able to mitigate the disaster, we will have earned back some capacity to grieve, rather than numbly suffering the ravages of environmental degradation. They mean that when we say “we,” the collective pronoun will resonate beyond the bounds of the much celebrated human saga into remote reaches of our temporal and spatial dwelling. Perhaps, to draw upon one of the most eloquent human arts, we may be privileged to perish as characters in tragedy rather than farce.

     — Don McKay, CM, Canadian poet, editor, educator  


https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/don-mckay

--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 15, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Legislative Standing Committee Meetings today: 
Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability, 10AM.
Topic: Future plans for Great Wisdom Buddhist Institute

The committee will meet with Buddhist nuns from the Great Wisdom Buddhist Institute to hear what plans the institute has for the future.
----------------
Special Committee on Climate Change, 1:30PM.
Topic: Briefing on Quebec zero emissions vehicle standards

The committee will meet to receive a briefing on the Quebec zero emission vehicle standard by Frédéric Dechamplain, Climate Change Advisor; and Marilou Gosselin, Coordinator, Program and Mobilization Department, of the Quebec Ministry of the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change.

The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public for in-person attendance, but this meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page. Audio and video recordings of the meeting and a transcript of same will later be made publicly available as well.

Legislative Assembly website:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/

Legislative Assembly Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/peileg

--------------------------
Next Week:

October 19th-25th:

Waste Reduction Week in Canada
(details to follow


If you want to give yourself a bit of a headache this early, then plow through Kevin Arsenault's "Ethical and Social Commentary" posting yesterday, summing up the Special Committee on Government Records Retention meeting yesterday...but a big thank you to Kevin for witnessing, digesting and reporting on this for Islanders.

Full posting:
https://kevinjarsenault.com/2020/10/14/did-this-man-just-bring-down-stewart-mckelvey-law-firm/?

(just go to the last part if your time is limited, copied below)

<snip>
Let's Sum Up
The egaming lawsuit has been going on since 2015.  Sworn Affidavits and Cross examinations were filed with the Supreme Court on numerous occasions. The cost to Mr. Maines has been substantial. With a decision expected from the Appeal Court imminently, consider where we are with this entire mess.

The key document that a Government files in a civil litigation, both the Plaintiff advancing the case and the Defendant, is called an Affidavit of Documents.  That document must be signed off on by someone with the Government’s Risk Management Division, who swears that all documents have been reviewed and disclosed in accordance with the law.

Marie Kemp swore that only Melissa MacEachern, Chris LeClair and Rory Beck once had documents in their possession but no longer have them, information that had already been exposed and made public by the Auditor General.

((Affadavit image show here in original posting))

The Information and Privacy Commissioner’s Order exposed that this affidavit was not accurate…

Today’s revelation proves it was also fraudulent…and that (outside cousel) Jonathan Coady deliberately misled the Court.

The King Government chose to continue the CMT lawsuit with Stewart McKelvey as Government’s counsel. That was a decision that would never have been made in any other jurisdiction with a change in power from liberal to Tory, for obvious reasons, but especially in a situation such as egaming where the Tories repeatedly and quite successfully attacked the Liberal government for the egaming scandal and coverup and the bogus defence Stewart McKelvey were advancing on Government’s behalf.

Did Premier King and his Cabinet know of these unethical and illegal shenanigans?  Given today’s revelations. Is there any chance Premier King will “unretain” Stewart McKelvey, something he should have done when he came into power?

-30-

This is like a persistent, bad smell in a basement...
And kudos to Sidney MacEwen and Michelle Beaton for their work -- MacEwen's questions, Beaton's managing of the Committee.


Quiet Hero https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/percy-schmeiser-dead-89-monsanto-1.5761714

Percy Schmeiser, farmer known for fight against Monsanto, dead at 89 - CBC News post by Heidi Atter

Published on-line at CBC News late Wednesday, October 14th, 2020

Percy Schmeiser, whose name became synonymous with the legal fight against patent rights centred around Monsanto's genetically modified canola, has died.  John Schmeiser told CBC News his father died peacefully in his sleep Tuesday afternoon at the age of 89. Schmeiser had Parkinson's disease.

The Saskatchewan farmer became famous in the late 1990s after agrochemical giant Monsanto took him to court. The company had found its genetically modified canola in Schmeiser's field, but he had never paid for the right to grow it.

Schmeiser insisted the seeds had blown onto his field in the wind and that he owned them.

Monsanto sued him, and in the end, the case went all the way to the Supreme Court, which ruled that the farmer had knowingly violated Monsanto's patent. 

Recently, a movie based on Schmeiser's life was released. 

Schmeiser's son John said the court case was only one part of his life, as it happened when Schmeiser was getting ready to retire. John said he'll remember Percy as a dedicated father, grandfather and businessman. 

"I am privileged to this day to be his son," John said. "Growing up, it was very, very evident right from the beginning about how concerned he was about his community and his family."

Schmeiser served on town council in Bruno, Sask., for several years, both as mayor and as a councillor. He also ran a couple of businesses and ran a farm, John said. 

"We were always busy," John said. "And he always made time to be with family. And when grandchildren started to rise, it just took it to another level for him because he had more children to be around."

Schmeiser would spoil his children and grandchildren but also pushed them to be their best. 

"He also challenged us … in a good way, to make sure that whatever we did or whatever we chose as a vocation, there's something that had a little difficulty with it," John said. "That challenge was all always done in a very friendly 'I have your best interests at heart' way."

John said the family was pleasantly surprised when Christopher Walken was announced to play his dad in the film, which is called simply Percy. He said he's been a fan of Walken's for a long time, but it was awkward to see his family's story on screen. His father was more joyful than Walken portrayed, he said. 

"My mom was a little disappointed that Christopher Walken had a goatee, as my father never did," John said with a laugh. "But in the end, we're very happy with his portrayal."

Schmeiser's longtime lawyer, who was with him throughout the landmark Monsanto case, said there were some things the movie got right and some it got wrong. 

Schmeiser was portrayed by Walken as somewhat grumpy or curmudgeonly, which Terry Zakreski said was very different from real life. 

"Notwithstanding all that pressure that he was under every morning … when we went to court, he had a smile on his face as big as all of Saskatchewan," Zakreski said.

"I never met a man like him that could face the challenges that he did and withstand it and still ... be the jovial person that he was," Zakreski said. "It is an inspiration about Percy, not just standing up for oneself, but to meet our burdens and challenges with enthusiasm." 

Zakreski saw the movie at the Calgary Film Festival with Schmeiser's son, John, and said it was a strange and surreal experience. 

Though he said the film got more things right than wrong, there were some aspects where the director took artistic licence. 

"The trial was a lot more intense and a lot more dramatic than it was portrayed," he said. "It took place in Saskatoon on a larger scale and it drew an incredible amount of interest. There were media scrums going into and out of court. It was a very high pressure situation."

Zakreski said Schmeiser's death wasn't a complete surprise because of his age and health concerns but still hurt to hear. 

"He was just an extraordinary person. I haven't met someone like him … an example for us all."

John said memories about his father that stand out are his passion for fishing and sharing his skills. 

"He would go to great lengths to take his grandchildren, when they were four, five, six years old, he would take them fishing. And he just loved doing that," John said. "For all of us, that was a very, very special thing and it was so important to him."

Schmeiser would be filled with pride when he saw his grandchildren catch their first fish, John said. 

"I don't know who had a bigger smile, [Schmeiser] or one of his grandchildren," John said. "For him, that was just an incredible sense of accomplishment, to see them catch fish."

John said he hopes his father is remembered as that dedicated grandfather, passionate fisher and someone who would do anything to see his community succeed. Schmeiser would be there for his customers at the farm equipment dealership at any time, and even in retirement watched the weather to make sure they had a good harvest, John said. 

Schmeiser is survived by his wife Louise. The two had just had their 68th wedding anniversary on Oct. 2. John said they met at a dance in Bruno, Sask., and lived there their entire lives. Now, Bruno is home for him and his siblings forever, he said. 

-30-


Met Opera video streaming:

Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Pretty Yende, Matthew Polenzani, Davide Luciano, and Ildebrando D'Arcangelo, conducted by Domingo Hindoyan. From February 10, 2018.  Fun, near-tragedy, gorgeous singing. 2hours 20 minutes

Thursday, October 15
Anna BolenaDonizetti’s, tonight 7:30PM until Friday about 6:30PM
From October 15, 2011.  "David McVicar's atmospheric and brooding production captures the drama of this riveting piece of British history, retold as only Donizetti could. International superstar Anna Netrebko is Queen Anne Boleyn, trapped in an unhappy marriage to King Henry VIII (Ildar Abdrazakov) whose roving eye has settled on another woman—Jane Seymour (Ekaterina Gubanova), Anna's friend, but now her unwitting rival. Add in Anna's early love, Percy (Stephen Costello), just returned to the court from exile, and the result is a haunting, explosive account of Queen Anna's tragic final days, before she goes to her execution in one of the most moving and dazzling final scenes in all of opera."  That says it all!  3 hours


Global Chorus essay for October 15
Susie Matthias

I say “yes”: that we as humanity can survive the current, and future, environmental and social crises.

But our global social issues cannot even begin to be solved if we as a people do not better ourselves toward being able to treat all others as equals – regardless of race, religion, colour or creed. As a person with a disability, I have met people of all kinds who have assisted me at times, and I see a lot of them with kindness once given a chance.

With regards to the environmental crisis, as a human race, we once had to rely on each other and the environment in order to survive. But over a period of time, we have become more selfish and self-centred. We have become greedy and less caring about how we treat the environment, taking all of the Earth’s resources without replenishing them.

Everything comes down to respect: if we accept others’ differences, and if we maintain the same respectful attitude toward our environment, then I feel that we all have an opportunity to survive and thrive.

      —Theresa Helen “Susie” Matthias, mouth painting artist, Mouth and Foot Painting Artists of Canada

--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 14, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Legislative Assembly committee meetings today:

Special Committee on Government Records Retention, 10AM.
Topic: Records retention matters identified in Auditor General's 2016 special assignment

The committee will meet with ITSS representatives Ed Malone (Director of Strategic Initiatives – Business Infrastructure Services) and John Brennan (Director of Business Infrastructure Services) to discuss records retention matters identified in the Auditor General’s 2016 report Special Assignment: Government Involvement with the E-gaming Initiative and Financial Services Platform.

Health and Social Development Standing Committee, 1:30PM.
Topic: Mental health and addictions of Islanders since the COVID-19 pandemic began

Location: First floor, Hon. George Coles Building, 175 Richmond Street

The committee will meet with Chief Superintendent/Commanding Officer of the RCMP (L Division), Jennifer Ebert.

For both: The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public. The meetings will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page.
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/    
https://www.facebook.com/peileg
------------------------------------

Munk Dialogue with Robert Reich 9PM, online.
Dialogue with Robert Reich, former U.S. labor secretary and economic inequality activist, on how to meet the once in a generation societal challenges presented by the current shakeout of the global economy.
https://munkdebates.com/dialogues/robert-reich
--------------------------
Grow Your Own Garlic, 9:30PM AT, University of British Columbia course, $15
https://ubcfarm.ubc.ca/workshops/


Well, of course!  https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/zac-murphy-says-local-issues-in-charlottetown-winsloe-are-his-focus-more-than-the-provincial-stakes-508971/

Zac Murphy says local issues in Charlottetown-Winsloe are his focus more than the provincial stakes - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Wednesday, October 14th, 2020

It’s difficult not to get caught up in the political stakes for the upcoming Charlottetown-Winsloe byelection.

If PC candidate Zack Bell wins, P.E.I. would cease to have a minority government and would be best referred to as having a slim majority. If either Green candidate Chris van Ouwerkerk, NDP candidate Lynne Thiele or Liberal candidate Zac Murphy wins, P.E.I. would remain in a minority government situation.

But Liberal candidate Zac Murphy says these provincewide stakes are not his main focus. For him, it’s the local concerns that really matter.   “In my opinion, the residents of District 10 need to be the focus of absolutely everything that we do," Murphy said in a recent interview from his campaign office in the Sherwood Business Centre.  "There's no question, the stakes are huge. And I think the only way we can properly serve the people that live in this district is by allowing them a chance to get to know us as candidates." 

At 29, Murphy is the youngest of the four candidates. His professional background is as a financial adviser with Younker & Kelly. But Murphy, who grew up in the district, also served as a member of the City of Charlottetown’s youth retention advisory board.

The board produced a 2018 youth housing report that served as an early push on decision-makers to address the housing crisis in P.E.I. The report also found that the increasing lack of affordability of housing, coupled with comparatively low wages, was a deterrent to young Islanders remaining in the province.

"That really generated a lot of conversation around this affordable housing,” Murphy said in an interview.  Among its recommendations, the report urged the City of Charlottetown to adopt inclusionary zoning policies and to obtain better data on the impact of short-term rentals on affordable housing.

Two years later, the outcomes have been mixed. Murphy believes the increased construction of rental housing has been a positive sign, but other elements, such as regulation of short-term rental operators, have been slow to come to fruition.

He believes all levels of government need to take a more hands-on role in planning housing, looking beyond four-year election cycles. He also believes that maintaining a stronger Liberal opposition will produce a better government.  "I think people are generally happy with the minority situation that we're in right now. I think it's important that we keep it that way," Murphy said.

In Charlottetown-Winsloe, Murphy says the two issues he believes are generating the most discussion are the planned expansion of West Royalty Elementary School and the impact of addiction and mental health in the community.

But Murphy also said engaging directly with voters in the district is a clear priority. Part of this engagement will come through traditional door-to-door canvassing.

"The central point of our campaign is we want to get out and talk to as many people as we possibly can,” Murphy said.  “That's going to be through a number of mediums, whether it's the phone, whether it’s social media or whether it's door-to-door canvassing."

While the Liberals have completed an operational plan detailing how they will conduct physically-distanced door canvassing in the byelection, the Progressive Conservatives have said they will avoid door-knocking entirely. In a media statement last week, Premier Dennis King urged other parties to “not bring unneeded worry and risk to the constituents” through door-to-door campaigning.
-30-


Atlantic Skies October 12th-18th, 2020  https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/lifestyles/regional-lifestyles/atlantic-skies-things-that-whizz-by-in-the-night-and-how-to-find-them-507206/

ATLANTIC SKIES: Things that whizz by in the night (and how to find them) - The Guardian column by Glenn K. Roberts

Published on Tuesday, October 13th, 2020

We've all read or heard about the bright, potentially naked-eye, comets that frequent our night skies each year.

There are countless others that are in the sky, but being well below naked-eye or even binocular visibility, they require a decent-sized telescope to spot. For those interested in following the passage of the more-distant and fainter comets across the night sky, there are several online sites that list which comets are within or nearing our solar system, their magnitude, position in the night sky, date and time visible, etc. An excellent site is http://aerith.net/comet/future-n.html

On occasion, you might notice a news headline about a newly-discovered asteroid that will be zipping past the Earth; the news bulletin is often aired only a day or two before the event, or, sometimes, after the fact. Fortunately for us here on Earth, these asteroids are relatively small (though still capable of significant damage should they strike a populated area), and are considerable distance from the Earth (usually well outside the orbit of our moon). NASA has a network of telescopes around the globe monitoring the night skies for any asteroids that pose at least the potential of intercepting our planet (referred to as Near Earth Objects or NEOs). Go to https://theskylive.com/near-earth-objects to find a list of NEOs that NASA is keeping an eye on.

A number of my readers have written asking about tiny, fast-moving points of light they've observed zipping across the night sky. Often, they make note that these points of light either suddenly appeared or disappeared in the section of the sky they were observing at the time.

"Alien spaceships?" they query. No, these points of light are satellites orbiting the Earth at high altitudes. They appear as points of light because they are illuminated by the sun's light; appearing suddenly as they exit Earth's shadow into the sunlight, or suddenly disappearing as they enter Earth's shadow. There are literally thousands of them zipping around our planet, leaving one wondering how it is they don't crash into one another.

Fortunately, they are all monitored and tracked by the nations that launch them into orbit, so there is little likelihood of them colliding with one another (although it has happened). For the most part, they present no problem for night sky observers, as they are usually very small pin-points of light that are always in motion. They do, however, pose a problem for astro-photographers taking long, time exposure shots of the night sky, as the travelling satellite may pass through the camera's field of view and be captured on film as a thin streak of light, essentially ruining the photo. Unfortunately, this problem has been, and will be, further exacerbated by Elon Musk's plan to launch 12,000 (yes, 12,000) SpaceX Starlink satellites (480+ to date) into low Earth orbit in the coming years. If tracking satellites is your thing, go to www.satview.org/

One light that whizzes across the night sky that readers may be interested in looking for is the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on Nov. 20, 1998, the ISS circles the Earth in approximately 93 mins (just over 15 orbits/day) at an average speed of 27,600 kilometres/hour, and at an average altitude of 400 kms. When it passes overhead, it is readily visible as a very bright (sometimes reaching magnitude -6 ), gold-tinged point of light (you can actually make out the space station's structure in binoculars or in a cell phone photo) moving steadily across the night sky. If you want to regularly watch the ISS pass over where you live, go to https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/, and click on the "sign up" icon to receive an e-notice whenever the ISS will be crossing your night sky.

This week's sky

Mercury is now heading towards inferior (passes between Earth and the sun) solar conjunction on Oct. 25, and, being very close to the sun, can't currently be seen.

Venus (magnitude -4.05) remains a pre-dawn object in the eastern sky, rising around 4 a.m. on Oct. 12 ( 4:15 a.m. by Oct. 18), and reaching a height of 30 degrees above the eastern horizon before fading with the dawn shortly after 7 a.m.

Mars, extremely bright right now (magnitude -2.62; brighter than Jupiter), is heading for opposition (directly opposite the sun as seen from Earth) on Oct. 13. The Red Planet is visible in the evening sky around 7:30 p.m., seven degrees above the eastern horizon, reaching an altitude of 49 degrees above the southern horizon by about 1:10 a.m., before disappearing from sight once it sinks below seven degrees above the western horizon around 6:45 a.m.

Jupiter (magnitude -2.3) is also an early evening object at present, visible 21 degrees above the southern horizon by about 6:50 p.m., never getting higher in the night sky, before being lost from sight after sinking below eight degrees above the southwest horizon around 10:20 p.m.

Saturn (magnitude +0.52) continues to shadow Jupiter across the late evening sky (visible just to the upper left of Jupiter), appearing in the southern evening sky around 7 p.m., and disappearing from view shortly after Jupiter, when it sinks below 10 degrees above the southwest horizon shortly before 10:40 p.m. 

Until next week, clear skies.

Events:

  • Oct. 13 - Mars at opposition

  • Oct. 16 - New Moon; Moon at perigee (closest to Earth)

-30-


Met Opera streaming

Donizetti’s La Fille du Régiment, unitl 6:30PM tonight
Starring Natalie Dessay, Felicity Palmer, Juan Diego Flórez, and Alessandro Corbelli, conducted by Marco Armiliato. From April 26, 2008.

Wednesday, October 14
Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, tonight 7:30PM until Thursday about 6:30PM
Starring Pretty Yende, Matthew Polenzani, Davide Luciano, and Ildebrando D'Arcangelo, conducted by Domingo Hindoyan. From February 10, 2018.  "Donizetti’s bubbly romantic comedy about a spunky landowner, a hapless peasant, and the dubious love potion that may or may not bring them together never fails to delight audiences." 2 hours and 22 minutes.


Global Chorus essay for October 14  
Ross Jackson

I believe the greatest threat to our survival is the way we have organized our international economic/ political structures. For example, the rules of the World Trade Organization work fine for corporations – especially the largest multinationals – but are particularly perverse in the way they penalize any country or company that tries to take the leadership in developing more environmentally friendly technologies. This is because the WTO rules do not permit a country to impose tariffs on foreign products produced with a lower environmental standard. In fact, a country cannot even demand to know how an imported product was produced. This one rule is, in my opinion, the greatest single barrier to a sustainable future.

The dismal record of the EU’s CO2 emissions quotas is a perfect example. The intention was fine, but there is no way to protect European companies that develop friendlier, but more costly technologies, because they will be undercut by foreign competitors. The result is that quota prices are too low to have any effect. If they were high enough to be effective, the EU’s corporations would scream and threaten to leave the EU (many have already done so). The difficulties of reform are further compounded by the fact that the people in charge of the WTO/IMF/World Bank are the very ones who benefit from the current system.

In Occupy World Street, I outline what I call a “breakaway strategy” that I believe has a chance of succeeding. It requires a few small countries to unite in forming an embryonic new organization giving the highest priority to sustainability and human rights – rather than economic growth – and then invite others to join. Te strategy requires that civil society around the world subsequently unites in support of the breakaway states.

I believe that this is our best chance for survival. All it really needs is a single visionary leader to step forward and follow Mahatma Gandhi’s advice: be the change you want to see in the world.

       — Ross Jackson, co-founder/chair of the Gaia Trust Foundation (Denmark), co-founder/funder of the Global Ecovillage Network and Gaia Education, author of Occupy World Street: A Global Roadmap for Radical Economic and Political Reform

www.gaia.org

https://gaia.org/gaia-trust/ross-jackson/
--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 13, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Noon today:
Charlottetown Farmers Market 2 GO order deadline for Thursday afternoon pickup.
https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/

(There is also Saturday pickup at the Market, with deadline Wednesday night, see here:
https://charlottetownfarmersmarket.com/online-market/

-------------------------
The P.E.I. Legislature will open in about a month, Thursday, November 12th, at 2PM.

Today:
Standing Committee on Education and Economic Development meeting, 1:30PM, livestreamed.

Topic: Reopening Schools

"The committee will meet to discuss the reopening of PEI schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Witnesses will include representatives from the Canadian Union Of Public Employees PEI (other potential witnesses TBA).

Please note that the Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public; however, this meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page. In addition, audio and video recordings of the meeting and a written transcript will later be made available via the website."
Legislative Assembly website

---------------------------
Webinar: "Drawdown 101 — An Introduction to the Science of Climate Solutions" , 9PM, on-line. "Join Dr. Jonathan Foley, Executive Director of Project Drawdown, for a LIVE presentation of the Project Drawdown Climate Solutions Framework." 
Registration Link

More on Project Drawdown at:
https://drawdown.org/


District 10: Charlottetown-Winsloe byelection signs are popping up, and the candidates are hosting (virtual) events.  They also are encouraging phone conversations with constituents and presumably interested Islanders.

Here is one from Green Party candidate Chris van Ouwerkerk tonight, and also Thursday night, 7:30PM (and I think later this week, see link for details): https://www.greenparty.pe.ca/freshandlocal?

please let me know if you hear of other candidates' events or have comments on the District.


A bit about The Leaders' Pledge for Nature, from late September 2020:
https://www.leaderspledgefornature.org/

Leaders’ Pledge for Nature

Political leaders participating in the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity in September 2020, representing 76 countries from all regions and the European Union, have committed to reversing biodiversity loss by 2030. By doing so, these leaders are sending a united signal to step up global ambition and encourage others to match their collective ambition for nature, climate and people with the scale of the crisis at hand.

United to Reverse Biodiversity Loss by 2030 for Sustainable Development
We, political leaders participating in the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity, representing 64*countries from all regions and the European Union, have come together today,on 28 September 2020, ahead of the Summit to send a united signal to step up global ambition for biodiversity and to commit to matching our collective ambition for nature, climate and people with the scale of the crisis at hand.  We reaffirm our commitment to international cooperation and multilateralism, based on unity, solidarity and trust among countries, peoples and generations, as the only way for the world to effectively respond to current and future global environmental crises  <snip>

the rest of the document at:
https://www.leaderspledgefornature.org/Leaders_Pledge_for_Nature_27.09.20.pdf
and has been signed by Canada and many other countries and supporters (see List here) but not the United States


Opera video streaming -- very dramatic, both with great acting and beautiful singing, with a tragic ending and a happy ending, respectively....
Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor, tonight until 6:30PM
Starring Anna Netrebko, Piotr Beczała, Mariusz Kwiecień, and Ildar Abdrazakov, conducted by Marco Armiliato. From February 7, 2009.

Donizetti’s La Fille du Régiment, 7:30PM tonight until Wednesday about 6:30PM
Starring Natalie Dessay, Felicity Palmer, Juan Diego Flórez, and Alessandro Corbelli, conducted by Marco Armiliato. From April 26, 2008.  "Madcap physical comedy and impeccable coloratura come together for Natalie Dessay’s indelible portrayal of the feisty tomboy raised by a regiment of French soldiers. Juan Diego Flórez is the young Swiss villager who captures her heart..." and sings this amazing tenor parts.


Global Chorus essay for October 13
John Pomeroy

We are in a very dangerous time in history due to rapidly rising greenhouse gas concentrations and other impacts of our growing population. Climate warming means that we are now starting to see exactly how loss of cold melts snow, permafrost, sea ice and glaciers and how intensification of the hydrological cycle results in severe storms, foods and droughts. This involves irreversible thermodynamics and complex ecohydrological regime changes which take time to manifest themselves and are often unanticipated. Changes to water are focused and magnified downstream in river basins and are inordinately directed to rivers, lakes, ponds, wetlands and floodplains where key ecosystems and our main communities reside.

I have found humanity’s response to the degradation of climate, ecosystems and water to be discouraging – we almost always respond and correct our behaviour only after a disaster and rarely with foresight. And then we try to forget about it. I fear that we will only begin to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions after repeated catastrophes have limited our ability and will to emit. It is virtually certain that we will see more extreme climate, ecosystem and water problems before the effects of declining emissions on climate become apparent. But there will be no return to “normal.” The responses to climate forcing will alter the Earth dramatically and irrevocably and require all the adaptation that humanity can tolerate.

Though unrecognizable in many instances, this will still be our home. Our clever species and many others will survive – intrinsically refigured by the trauma of change. Through this we must ensure that decency, diplomacy, integrity and our natural creative, hopeful spirit survive as we contend with irreversible thermodynamics and ecohydrological change.

       — Professor John Pomeroy, Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change, director of the Centre for Hydrology at the University of Saskatchewan

John's page at the Global Institute for Water Security:

https://water.usask.ca/about/profiles/people/john-pomeroy.php
--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 12, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Happy Thanksgiving, and

Thanks to Ian Petrie for sharing this:

"At the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, we are keenly aware of whom and what we are thankful for.

We are thankful for the land defenders and water protectors who, in the midst of this unprecedented upheaval, remain unwavering in their dedication to protecting ecosystems from coast to coast to coast. 

We're grateful for the essential and front line workers who have been literally putting their lives and health on the line to, yes, keep the economy running, but also to ensure that public services and infrastructure–after decades of underfunding–are still there to address the basic needs of people and communities.

We thank the migrant workers, denied immigration status or full access to labour rights and benefits including health care, on whom so much of what we rely–in many cases, the food we will eat this weekend, and the care our elderly relatives receive–depends.

We recognize the labour–often unpaid and too often unnoticed–of parents and caregivers, largely women, who have struggled to maintain a basis of normalcy and sense of security for their children, families and friends through a profoundly difficult year.

We want to thank all of the “caremongerers” who continue to reach out to neighbours who are unable to shop or easily connect with others outside their homes."


It was eight years ago today on a rainy later Friday afternoon, that the Robert Ghiz government presumably instructed the RCMP to evict peaceful protesters and destroy their camp in a Hemlock Grove in Churchill, Queens County, to allow the tree-cutting machinery in to continue to build the "Plan B" Highway. 


small sign in a hemlock grove

Roads seem to get built all the time on P.E.I., but for a small land base and an unsustainable reliance on new road construction (and squiggy federal funding sources), we should continue to question that.  The issues with the Plan B highway that really crossed lines (literally) were its total lack of public consultation on the final design, its complete misuse of statistics (on accidents and such) to shore up its safety argument claims, its disregard for the older residents in the area, and of course, its destruction of so much farmland and woodland, including rare patches of Island Old Growth forest.  Take time to visit some trees today, and take this as a thank-you to all who get involved for standing up for what is right and what we need to protect, even if we get bulldozed down every so often. 
-- Chris


Global Chorus essayist Mary Evelyn Tucker has done so much -- here are a few interesting resources that touch on her work and world: Center for Humans and Nature

Whose Mission is: to explore and promote human responsibilities in relation to nature — the whole community of life.

and the values are well worth reading.
on this page: https://www.humansandnature.org/mission-values
----------------------------------------
Journey of the Universe: https://www.journeyoftheuniverse.org/
a film and book she co-wrote with Brian Thomas Swimme, and a good introduction here:

TED Talk:
Mary Evelyn Tucker of Yale University introduces Journey of the
Universe, a multi-media collaboration inspired by Thomas Berry's
"The New Story." Journey of the Universe weaves together scientific
discoveries and humanistic insights to create a new narrative of the
evolution of the universe - from the Big Bang to the impact of human
life on our planet.

http://thomasberry.org/publications-and-media/journey-of-the-universe-mary-evelyn-tucker-at-tedxfgcu
--------------------------------------
because I need the clarification:

Thomas Berry:
Thomas Berry, CP, PhD (November 9, 1914 – June 1, 2009) (born in Greensboro, North Caroline) was a cultural historian and scholar of the world’s religions, especially Asian traditions. Later as he studied Earth history and evolution, he called himself a “geologian.”   http://thomasberry.org/\

Wendell Berry
Wendell Erdman Berry (born August 5, 1934)(bornin Henry County, Kentucky)  is an American novelist, poet, essayist, environmental activist, cultural critic, and farmer.
http://www.wendellberrybooks.com/


Thankful for the Metropolitan Opera:

Wagner’s Parsifal, until 6:30PM this evening
Starring Katarina Dalayman, Jonas Kaufmann, Peter Mattei, Evgeny Nikitin, and René Pape, conducted by Daniele Gatti. From March 2, 2013.

Now we begin something different -- Donizetti Week:
Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor, tonight 7:30PM until Tuesday 6:30PM
From February 7, 2009. "Star soprano Anna Netrebko... (is... Donizetti’s hapless heroine ...Rising young tenor sensation Piotr Beczała is Edgardo and Mariusz Kwiecien plays Lucia’s brother Enrico whose brutal authority forces her to deny her heart and marry for the sake of her family. The famous mad scene brilliantly depicts the cascading fragments of Lucia’s disintegrating mind."  2 hours 22 minutes

The schedule is here:
https://www.metopera.org/user-information/nightly-met-opera-streams/

and about Donizetti, from Wikipedia:
Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti  (29 November 1797 – 8 April 1848) was an Italian composer, best known for his almost 70 operas. Along with Gioachino Rossini and Vincenzo Bellini, Donizetti was a leading composer of the bel canto opera style during the first half of the nineteenth century.


Global Chorus essay for October 12 
Mary Evelyn Tucker

More than ever before in human history we are facing a moment of immense historical consequence. Our planet has evolved over four and a half billion years. It has brought forth complex and beautiful life forms. We are latecomers to the Earth community. Our planetary presence and our technological powers are causing the climate to change, species to go extinct and ecosystems to be diminished. We have an immense challenge before us.

In over two hundred thousand years of our presence on this blue-green planet we have never been asked to renew the face of the Earth. That is what we are being asked to do now. To renew our wetlands and restore our woodlands. To re-inhabit cities and countryside in a sustaining way. To participate in healthy cycles of carbon and nitrogen. To become a life-enhancing species on a life-giving planet. This is no small task.

The possibility that is held forth for us as humans in renewing the face of the Earth is to become worthy of our name Homo sapiens sapiens. Perhaps we had to be named twice, sapiens, so we could reflect on what our gift of self-refection would mean over time. We have to earn the name of wisdom. To do that we will need to draw in the powers which have helped to shape our universe and Earth. As Thomas Berry suggested, this immense journey may be a source of great strength as we align our efforts with the unfolding universe:

"If the dynamics of the universe from the beginning shaped the course of the heavens, lighted the sun, and formed the Earth, if this same dynamism brought forth the continents and seas and atmosphere, if it awakened life in the primordial cell and then brought into being the unnumbered variety of living beings, and finally brought us into being and guided us safely through the turbulent centuries, there is reason to believe that this same guiding process is precisely what has awakened in us our present understanding of ourselves and our relation to this stupendous process. Sensitized to such guidance from the very structure and functioning of the universe, we can have confidence in the future that awaits the human venture."

The Dream of the Earth, Thomas Berry

       —Dr. Mary Evelyn Tucker, founder of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale University

Her profile from Yale University:
https://environment.yale.edu/profile/tucker
--------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 11, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events: Downtown Chartlottetown Farmers' Market, 11AM-4PM, Lower Queen Street.

"Hope you can join us at the Downtown Charlottetown Farmer's Market tomorrow. What’s more fall that strolling an open air Farmers Market, choosing fresh produce and beautiful crafts from local makers, Scarecrows, Stilt Walkers, food service and more."


From The Leap Organization and others, the second video "looking back" on how we can get to the future we want, heal the planet and the living beings on it.  And beautifully illustrated.

Message from the Future II: The Years of Repair
'Do we have a right to be hopeful? With political and ecological fires raging all around, is it irresponsible to imagine a future world radically better than our own? A world without prisons? Of beautiful, green public housing? Of buried border walls? Of healed ecosystems? A world where governments fear the people instead of the other way around? “A Message From the Future II: The Years of Repair” is an animated short film that dares to dream of a future in which 2020 is a historic turning point, where the lessons of the Covid-19 pandemic and global uprisings against racism drive us to build back a better society in which no one is sacrificed and everyone is essential. The film is a sequel to the 2019 Emmy-nominated short film “A Message From the Future” with Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and features the art of Molly Crabapple, with the political storytelling of Naomi Klein, Avi Lewis, and Opal Tometi. The cast of narrators from around the world includes Tometi, Emma Thompson, Gael García Bernal, and the Nigerian poet and activist Nnimmo Bassey. Produced with The Leap.

Please visit their site at https://theleap.org and subscribe to their channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcaa_RkWkP_DHG4tx5c94Pw

Message from the Future II YouTube:  about 9 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2m8YACFJlMg

and a live chat from October 1st with the creative team behind Message II at its launch:
"A live chat with members of the team behind the film “A Message From the Future II: Years of Repair" including host Emma Thompson, Naomi Klein, Opal Tometi, and Nnimmo Bassey."  about an hour (I have not watched all of this yet)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-MLWu2xpS0

And the first one:

A Message From the Future With Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

"What if we actually pulled off a Green New Deal? What would the future look like? The Intercept presents a film narrated by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and illustrated by Molly Crabapple."  7 1/2 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9uTH0iprVQ&ab_channel=TheIntercept


Still Wagner! Met Opera streaming

Wagner’s Götterdämmerung, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Christa Ludwig, Siegfried Jerusalem, and Matti Salminen, conducted by James Levine. From May 5, 1990.  Spolier: the gold returns to the Rhine.

Wagner’s Parsifal, tonight 7:30PM until Monday about 6:30PM
 From March 2, 2013.
"Wagner’s final masterpiece. Jonas Kaufmann in the title role of the fool “made wise by compassion” is as convincing vocally as he is haunting dramatically, delivering a thoroughly moving portrayal. René Pape is equally compelling as (a) veteran Knight of the Grail..."  Clocks in under 5 hours.  :-)


Global Chorus essay for October 11
Anita Stewart


If humankind is to survive, let us rekindle the extraordinary spirit that built our respective nations. Let’s learn and honour the fact that farmers and plumbers and cooks are as important to society as lawyers and politicians and pundits. Let’s cook, eat and preserve the harvest together, sharing our knowledge generously. Let’s embrace one another’s happiness as our own.

These dreams are indeed achievable. As Jesuit thinker Tomas Merton wrote, “We are already one. But we imagine that we are not. And what we have to recover is our original unity. What we have to be is what we are.”

       — Anita Stewart, culinary activist, food and travel journalist, founder of Food Day Canada


July 31st, 2021:
https://fooddaycanada.ca/

------------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 10, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Farmers' Markets in Charlottetown (8-1PM -- outside) and Summerside (9AM-1PM -- INSIDE)

Tomorrow is the last: Sunday Downtown Charlottetown Market, 11AM-4PM, lower Queen Street


Opinion: https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/paul-schneidereit-partisan-politics-and-the-pitfalls-of-tribalism-504601/

PAUL SCHNEIDEREIT: Partisan politics and the pitfalls of tribalism - The Chronicle Herald column by Paul Scheidereit

Published on Thursday, October 1st, 2020, in Saltwire publications

This column’s ultimately to be about politics. But, bear with me, let’s start with a few concepts.

First, it’s our nature to be tribal.

Early humans, to survive, had to band together, to improve chances for a successful hunt and to stay safe in a dangerous world.

Your tribe was crucial. If you had to overlook things you didn’t like, or didn’t agree with, when at stake was inclusion or expulsion, you usually sided with your group, simply to survive.

That impulse was so vital, some experts say, it played a role in the evolution of our species. People who left their tribes to go it alone had a lower chance of survival than those who remained. 

At the same time, the human mind abhors cognitive dissonance. By that, I mean it’s hard to stay committed to something — whether people or an idea — to which you’re deeply opposed.

Which creates a dilemma. If survival depends on staying in your group, but you fundamentally disagree with their ideals and actions, what do you do?

Enter humanity’s ability to rationalize.

To repel cognitive dissonance, experts argue, people may — even unconsciously — rationalize away offending behaviour or ideas, from making excuses for the unpalatable to outright denial they even existed.

(For more on these ideas, there’s Willful Blindness: Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril, by Margaret Heffernan, and The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt.)

I’m not saying people can’t be self-aware about these tendencies. I’m saying not everyone makes the effort.

What’s this look like today?

Take sports. Die-hard fans of rival teams watch the same game, the same plays, and yet come to completely different conclusions about what they’ve seen. In hockey, for example, my team’s solid bodycheck might, in a rival fan’s eyes, be a dirty hit. And vice versa.

Or religion, for a more serious example. Vast amounts of blood have been shed throughout history in religious conflicts that essentially boiled down to my religion (or interpretation) vs. yours.

Or politics.

You know that old rule: No politics at family holiday dinner get-togethers. We don’t want Uncle Donnie, a life-long Liberal, throttling Cousin Joe, a dyed-in-the-wool Conservative, over whose side was right and wrong about, well, everything.

We all know people who are uber-partisan about politics. Seen another way, it’s a variation on the human tendency to stick with one’s group, complete with rationalizations to make transgressions by your side explainable — or invisible — while those by the other side are evidence of moral corruption, criminality and worse.

My tribe vs. yours.

It affects those practising politics, too.

Destructive partisanship, as seen in the extreme in the U.S., but also evidenced by the shenanigans of the Nova Scotia Liberals in limiting proper oversight of government actions by legislative committees, does not serve the public.

Here’s a thought. Imagine if we elected MLAs, but parties weren’t allowed? Imagine if we voted for candidates based not on the colour of their lawn signs but their individual merits. (I know, many do vote for the best candidate regardless of party, but they’re a minority.) Imagine if those elected then worked together on the problems of the day without checking if colleagues were “one of us” or “one of them.”

That concept — called consensus government — does exist in some places (for example, Nunavut), but nowhere of size.

Pity. One of the many pitfalls with tribalism is it’s so damn predictable.

-30-

I haven't seen a "playbook" for how a small area could "evolve" or "devolve" from an established political parties' system to a consensus system, but perhaps someone has seen one and can pass it on our has some idea. 
Trying a different voting method like Proportional Representation should allow for more collaboration between MLAs from different parties, and still allow voters to identify with a set a values (and keep with that and the organizational aspects and other apparent positives of the Party system) and have the voting system more clearly represent the values of the voters.

----------------------------------
Saturday, October 24th:
Forum: "PR Vision 2020 and Beyond: Ways Forward", 2PM, on-line

Islanders for Proportional Representation (IPR) will host the virtual forum, PR Vision 2020 and beyond: Ways Forward, Oct 24 at 2PM. The interactive online event will mark 18 months since the 2019 referendum which revealed that a growing number of Islanders want electoral democracy in the form of proportional representation (PR) for PEI. Keynote speaker Willie Sullivan from the Scottish branch of Electoral Reform Society, will discuss how PR is working in Scotland, how difficulties are being addressed, and how many fears about PR are proving to be unfounded. To register, visit islanders4pr.ca or follow Islanders4pr on FB. All are welcome to attend.
https://www.islanders4pr.ca/
https://www.facebook.com/islanders4pr/


An "In case you missed it", as I missed part of it, but:
The 5AM Friday October 9th, 2020, morning CBC Radio's playing of the BBC's interview show HARDTalk with Stephen Sackur featured a discussion with Harvard professor Joe Henrich, who "says Western society is unique in the world because it is 'weird' - Western, educated, industrialised, rich and democratic. What does that mean?" 


https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cszc6y
23 minutes long


Lots of Saturday and Sunday opera:

Radio:
Saturday afternoon, with Ben Heppner, 1PM, 104.7FM
Handel's Julius Caesar, with the English National Orchestra and Chorus
details:
https://www.cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/2-4288-saturday-afternoon-at-the-opera


Video streaming: Metropolitan Opera:

Wagner’s Siegfried, until 6:30PM Saturday
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Siegfried Jerusalem, and James Morris. From April 26, 1990. Siegfried, raised by a dwarf, grows up, figures out the sword, finds Brunhilde, and all ends so happily and with SO much singing!

Wagner’s Götterdämmerung, 7:30PM Saturday until Sunday about 6:30PM
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Christa Ludwig, Siegfried Jerusalem, and Matti Salminen. From May 5, 1990. "And after twenty hours of opera, you're right back where you started from...."!


Timing...
Global Chorus essay writer for October 10th (George Mu'Ammar) works in the United Nations World Food Programme, which was just awarded  The 2020 Nobel Peace Prize, “for its efforts to combat hunger, for its contribution to bettering conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas and for acting as a driving force in efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict”.


CBC article on the WFP win


Global Chorus essay for October 10
George Mu’Ammar


How do we discuss “change”? “Did the dinosaurs evolve or die out?” Both and neither; the problem is only linguistic. “People who love this country can change it” has more meanings and implications than words. Language appears inappropriate for defining, analyzing and solving problems that go beyond individual daily personal life. We are language animals, genetically built for communication. But we do talk too much, giving ourselves unjustified praise, often lies, to satisfy our justice-seeking sentiments, or those of the conqueror within us. Language distorts and misrepresents reality, even nullifying efforts of entire communities. Years of manipulation using language produced societies that can be driven to consensus by religious/political leaders but, regardless of centuries of scientific advancements are incapable of agreeing upon solutions to problems that are easily observed and quantified by individuals.

Today we realize that global social and environmental problems are relentlessly advancing uncontrollably because of financial and political drivers. Commodities are incorrectly priced, discounting the real cost of the social/environmental impact their production caused. Incorrect measures of human success, defined in previous eras were based upon religious fantasies or military ideals with no regard for the bigger picture drawn by human accomplishments. We must start today defining standards for equilibrated globalized pricing of our industrial production based on the real cost to the planet, and more importantly (but less urgently) redefining the meaning of “success” by giving individuals the ethical background and support to define their moral compass and their goals in compatibility with those of their community and society, if necessary by calling upon the human need for religion and justice.

Human knowledge is adept at saving the global situation, requiring extensive and prolonged efforts on behalf of us all, with the only reward being the awareness of not having damaged Mother Nature as our predecessors had. Our consumption/disposal of food and non-food commodities must change based on new ideals to which our industrial practices must adapt, driven mostly by adjusted pricing. Our energy production/ consumption must be redesigned and our demand for military hardware must cease, outlawed. Obtaining this in a democratic world requires not only increased global awareness but also a correct metering of our actions and ambitions and those of our communities, guided by scientific strategy and not political blurb.

     —George Mu’Ammar, spatial analyst for the Food Security Analysis Service, Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping, UN World Food Programme; hobbyist beekeeper

  -------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 9, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Legislative Committee Meetings today:

Special Committee on Retention of Government Records, 9AM (**in camera** so no recording available)
Topic: Consideration of the committee's report

The committee will meet to begin consideration of its report to the Legislative Assembly. Please note: this will be an in camera meeting.

Heath and Social Development Standing Committee meeting, 1:30PM, online

Topic: Update on the Affordable Housing Development Program

The committee will meet to hear an update on the Affordable Housing Development Program.

  • Deputy Minister of Social Development and Housing (David Keedwell)

  • Director of Housing Services (Sonya Cobb)

The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public for in-person attendance, but this meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page. Audio and video recordings of the meeting and a transcript of same will later be made publicly available as well.

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/
https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

MOVED TO TODAY (and inside) due to yesterday's weather:
Farm Centre Legacy Garden Thanksgiving Sale, 2-5:30PM, Farm Centre, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.
Garlic, Tomatoes: Roma and Mountain Merit, Tomato Seconds, Green Tomatoes, Legacy Apples, Asian Pears, Hardy Kiwis, Tomatillos, Winter squash: butternut, acorn, kabocha, Dried herbs: Basil, parsley, sage, 
AND wreaths graciously donated by Yanira Greener for sale for your Thanksgiving decor.
-------------------
Fridays4Future gathering, 4PM, outside Province House.
Facebook event details
And if you can't make it, consider writing a quick note to your MLA (contact page here) reminding them the Climate Crisis is still happening, and we hope they are dealing with it effectively and as urgently as needed, too. (see article about Nova Scotia, below)

MLAs' contact page:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/members


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/jim-vibert-climate-crisis-takes-backseat-to-covid-506465/

JIM VIBERT: Climate crisis takes backseat to COVID - The Guardian column by Jim Vibert

Published on Tuesday, October 6th, 2020, in Saltwire publications

One crisis at a time, please.

Before the end of this year, Nova Scotians should be in possession of the provincial government’s seminal plan to combat the climate crisis, along with the regulations that give force to legislation the Liberals claim will set Nova Scotia on path to a carbon-neutral, sustainable future.

Don’t expect to see either, at least not on the schedule that, last year, was sacrosanct according to the government.

In the fall of 2019, months before anyone heard of COVID-19, the climate crisis gripped the globe. Millions marched in streets all over the world – more than 10,000 in Halifax alone. Nova Scotia’s Liberal government took notice and was moved to act.

“Thousands of people took to the streets just to show how concerned they are,” provincial Environment Minister Gordon Wilson said at the time. “They expect government to take urgent action, and we agree.”

That action came in the form of the new Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act (EGSPA), passed last fall to replace the ground-breaking 2007 Nova Scotia law of the same name. The original law took Nova Scotia to the head of the Canadian pack with its 2020 targets to reduce carbon emissions and build an economy based on principles of sustainability.

By contract, the bill Wilson introduced in October 2019 was a pale imitation. It was a framework – a shell, some would say – resplendent with language designed to soothe the masses crying out for climate action, but utterly devoid of that action.

Fear not, the Liberals told those of us who are more than a little worried about wildfires consuming North America’s west coast, disappearing glaciers, rising sea levels and 100-year storms arriving annually.

Before the end of 2020, the government said, the province’s plan to mitigate and adapt to climate change would be available for all to see in a strategy that, while unwritten, was already titled: “Climate Change Plan for Clean Growth.”

But that wasn’t all. After consulting with Nova Scotians, the province would also produce regulations to put flesh on the bones of its new EGSPA. Action was indeed urgent and before the end of 2020 Nova Scotians were to know what that action would be.

But alas, along came COVID-19 and the government – or at least that small slice of government capable of making stuff happen – was seized with the more immediate emergency.

The existential threat to the planet would have to wait for the virus to abate. Or, as Nova Scotia’s Environment Department now says:

“We had planned to do in-person and online consultation on the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act and the Climate Change Plan for Clean Growth starting in early March. COVID-19 impacted that plan. Nova Scotia Environment is looking forward to hearing from Nova Scotians, and we're working to determine how and when we can move forward. When that happens, we will let Nova Scotians know.”

The thousands in the streets disappeared, and the imperative of the province to act on climate change went right along with them. Wilson’s urgency of a year ago has been replaced by a “stay tuned’ message from his department today.

Sources well-placed to know say the province plans to start consultations with stakeholders soon, but broader consultations with Nova Scotia will be postponed until 2021. The plan and regulations promised for this year, presumably, will follow the consultations sometime next year, COVID-willing.

There’s no doubt that the coronavirus has interrupted or changed the plans of many, if not most, of us.

But the government of Nova Scotia is a big outfit – big enough to walk and chew gum at the same time.

Given the near-total absence of COVID-19 from the province during the months of August, September and now well into October, this seems like an opportune time for consultations, if indeed the government was ready to conduct them. Who knows what the new year will bring?

Surely, the Environment Department and other ministries involved with the consultations and with drafting the climate plan and the regulations weren’t seized by the provincial response to COVID-19.

The decision-making apparatus of the province, however, centralized as it is in and around the premier’s office was almost entirely occupied by COVID-19. Everything else except the most pressing of matters could wait.

Obviously, the climate crisis and the province’s sustainable future are matters that can wait, so far as the provincial Liberals are concerned.

Because they can only deal with one crisis at a time.

-30-

P.E.I.'s Climate Action Plan:
https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/topic/climate-change-action-plan
 


The Ring continues...
Met Opera video streaming access:

Wagner’s Die Walküre, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Jessye Norman, Christa Ludwig, Gary Lakes, James Morris, and Kurt Moll. From April 8, 1989.

Friday, October 9
Wagner’s Siegfried, tonight 7:30PM until Saturday 6:30PM
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Siegfried Jerusalem, and James Morris. From April 26, 1990.  So the Siegfried is sung by a Siegfried and Brunhilde by a Hildegard!  With the Best Wotan, James Morrris.


Super guy:
http://davidrichardboyd.com/

and work on Environmental Right is happening!

Global Chorus essay for October 9 
David R. Boyd


I’m an optimistic environmentalist. That’s not an oxymoron. Over the past fifty years we’ve witnessed an extraordinary transformation of human legal systems, values and behaviour. Hundreds of international environmental treaties. Thousands of new environmental laws. The emergence of a new human right – to live in a healthy environment – now endorsed by 90 per cent of the world’s nations. This right is protected in over 100 constitutions, indicating it is among our most deeply cherished values and aspirations.

Some environmental laws are like hibernating polar bears, not yet active, but many are already fulfilling their goals. Safe drinking water has been extended to billions of people around the world. CFCs and other chemicals threatening to destroy the Earth’s protective ozone layer have been virtually eliminated. The most deadly persistent organic pollutants are globally banned. Endangered species including grey whales, bald eagles and sea otters recovered from the brink of extinction. Levels of some air pollutants are down 90 per cent.

Humanity still faces monumental environmental challenges. But our track record of successes provides a powerful elixir of hope. We can reboot society to flourish on 100 per cent renewable energy from sun, wind and water. We can create a circular economy without waste and pollution. We can grow delicious and nutritious food locally. We can build bright, green cities where everyone lives within a five-minute walk of green spaces – parks, community gardens and orchards. Walking, cycling and public transit will be more convenient and economical than driving. Buildings will produce more energy than they consume. From Vancouver to Stockholm, these visions are becoming reality.

Western cultures are recovering the indigenous wisdom that we depend on Nature for health, well-being and prosperity. We must treat this wonderful planet, our home, with the respect and reverence it richly deserves. Within the geologically infinitesimal span of one or two generations – ours and our children’s – we can ensure a cleaner, greener, healthier and happier future for all of Earth’s inhabitants.

       —David R. Boyd, PhD, author, environmental lawyer, professor, co-chair of Vancouver’s Greenest City Action Team

  ----------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca


October 9, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Legislative Committee Meetings today:

Special Committee on Retention of Government Records, 9AM (**in camera** so no recording available)
Topic: Consideration of the committee's report

The committee will meet to begin consideration of its report to the Legislative Assembly. Please note: this will be an in camera meeting.

Heath and Social Development Standing Committee meeting, 1:30PM, online

Topic: Update on the Affordable Housing Development Program

The committee will meet to hear an update on the Affordable Housing Development Program.

  • Deputy Minister of Social Development and Housing (David Keedwell)

  • Director of Housing Services (Sonya Cobb)

The Hon. George Coles Building remains closed to the public for in-person attendance, but this meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly’s website and Facebook page. Audio and video recordings of the meeting and a transcript of same will later be made publicly available as well.

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/
https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

MOVED TO TODAY (and inside) due to yesterday's weather:
Farm Centre Legacy Garden Thanksgiving Sale, 2-5:30PM, Farm Centre, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.
Garlic, Tomatoes: Roma and Mountain Merit, Tomato Seconds, Green Tomatoes, Legacy Apples, Asian Pears, Hardy Kiwis, Tomatillos, Winter squash: butternut, acorn, kabocha, Dried herbs: Basil, parsley, sage, 
AND wreaths graciously donated by Yanira Greener for sale for your Thanksgiving decor.
-------------------
Fridays4Future gathering, 4PM, outside Province House.
Facebook event details
And if you can't make it, consider writing a quick note to your MLA (contact page here) reminding them the Climate Crisis is still happening, and we hope they are dealing with it effectively and as urgently as needed, too. (see article about Nova Scotia, below)

MLAs' contact page:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/members


https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/jim-vibert-climate-crisis-takes-backseat-to-covid-506465/

JIM VIBERT: Climate crisis takes backseat to COVID - The Guardian column by Jim Vibert

Published on Tuesday, October 6th, 2020, in Saltwire publications

One crisis at a time, please.

Before the end of this year, Nova Scotians should be in possession of the provincial government’s seminal plan to combat the climate crisis, along with the regulations that give force to legislation the Liberals claim will set Nova Scotia on path to a carbon-neutral, sustainable future.

Don’t expect to see either, at least not on the schedule that, last year, was sacrosanct according to the government.

In the fall of 2019, months before anyone heard of COVID-19, the climate crisis gripped the globe. Millions marched in streets all over the world – more than 10,000 in Halifax alone. Nova Scotia’s Liberal government took notice and was moved to act.

“Thousands of people took to the streets just to show how concerned they are,” provincial Environment Minister Gordon Wilson said at the time. “They expect government to take urgent action, and we agree.”

That action came in the form of the new Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act (EGSPA), passed last fall to replace the ground-breaking 2007 Nova Scotia law of the same name. The original law took Nova Scotia to the head of the Canadian pack with its 2020 targets to reduce carbon emissions and build an economy based on principles of sustainability.

By contract, the bill Wilson introduced in October 2019 was a pale imitation. It was a framework – a shell, some would say – resplendent with language designed to soothe the masses crying out for climate action, but utterly devoid of that action.

Fear not, the Liberals told those of us who are more than a little worried about wildfires consuming North America’s west coast, disappearing glaciers, rising sea levels and 100-year storms arriving annually.

Before the end of 2020, the government said, the province’s plan to mitigate and adapt to climate change would be available for all to see in a strategy that, while unwritten, was already titled: “Climate Change Plan for Clean Growth.”

But that wasn’t all. After consulting with Nova Scotians, the province would also produce regulations to put flesh on the bones of its new EGSPA. Action was indeed urgent and before the end of 2020 Nova Scotians were to know what that action would be.

But alas, along came COVID-19 and the government – or at least that small slice of government capable of making stuff happen – was seized with the more immediate emergency.

The existential threat to the planet would have to wait for the virus to abate. Or, as Nova Scotia’s Environment Department now says:

“We had planned to do in-person and online consultation on the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act and the Climate Change Plan for Clean Growth starting in early March. COVID-19 impacted that plan. Nova Scotia Environment is looking forward to hearing from Nova Scotians, and we're working to determine how and when we can move forward. When that happens, we will let Nova Scotians know.”

The thousands in the streets disappeared, and the imperative of the province to act on climate change went right along with them. Wilson’s urgency of a year ago has been replaced by a “stay tuned’ message from his department today.

Sources well-placed to know say the province plans to start consultations with stakeholders soon, but broader consultations with Nova Scotia will be postponed until 2021. The plan and regulations promised for this year, presumably, will follow the consultations sometime next year, COVID-willing.

There’s no doubt that the coronavirus has interrupted or changed the plans of many, if not most, of us.

But the government of Nova Scotia is a big outfit – big enough to walk and chew gum at the same time.

Given the near-total absence of COVID-19 from the province during the months of August, September and now well into October, this seems like an opportune time for consultations, if indeed the government was ready to conduct them. Who knows what the new year will bring?

Surely, the Environment Department and other ministries involved with the consultations and with drafting the climate plan and the regulations weren’t seized by the provincial response to COVID-19.

The decision-making apparatus of the province, however, centralized as it is in and around the premier’s office was almost entirely occupied by COVID-19. Everything else except the most pressing of matters could wait.

Obviously, the climate crisis and the province’s sustainable future are matters that can wait, so far as the provincial Liberals are concerned.

Because they can only deal with one crisis at a time.

-30-

P.E.I.'s Climate Action Plan:
https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/topic/climate-change-action-plan
 


The Ring continues...
Met Opera video streaming access:

Wagner’s Die Walküre, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Jessye Norman, Christa Ludwig, Gary Lakes, James Morris, and Kurt Moll. From April 8, 1989.

Friday, October 9
Wagner’s Siegfried, tonight 7:30PM until Saturday 6:30PM
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Siegfried Jerusalem, and James Morris. From April 26, 1990.  So the Siegfried is sung by a Siegfried and Brunhilde by a Hildegard!  With the Best Wotan, James Morrris.


Super guy:
http://davidrichardboyd.com/

and work on Environmental Right is happening!

Global Chorus essay for October 9 
David R. Boyd


I’m an optimistic environmentalist. That’s not an oxymoron. Over the past fifty years we’ve witnessed an extraordinary transformation of human legal systems, values and behaviour. Hundreds of international environmental treaties. Thousands of new environmental laws. The emergence of a new human right – to live in a healthy environment – now endorsed by 90 per cent of the world’s nations. This right is protected in over 100 constitutions, indicating it is among our most deeply cherished values and aspirations.

Some environmental laws are like hibernating polar bears, not yet active, but many are already fulfilling their goals. Safe drinking water has been extended to billions of people around the world. CFCs and other chemicals threatening to destroy the Earth’s protective ozone layer have been virtually eliminated. The most deadly persistent organic pollutants are globally banned. Endangered species including grey whales, bald eagles and sea otters recovered from the brink of extinction. Levels of some air pollutants are down 90 per cent.

Humanity still faces monumental environmental challenges. But our track record of successes provides a powerful elixir of hope. We can reboot society to flourish on 100 per cent renewable energy from sun, wind and water. We can create a circular economy without waste and pollution. We can grow delicious and nutritious food locally. We can build bright, green cities where everyone lives within a five-minute walk of green spaces – parks, community gardens and orchards. Walking, cycling and public transit will be more convenient and economical than driving. Buildings will produce more energy than they consume. From Vancouver to Stockholm, these visions are becoming reality.

Western cultures are recovering the indigenous wisdom that we depend on Nature for health, well-being and prosperity. We must treat this wonderful planet, our home, with the respect and reverence it richly deserves. Within the geologically infinitesimal span of one or two generations – ours and our children’s – we can ensure a cleaner, greener, healthier and happier future for all of Earth’s inhabitants.

       —David R. Boyd, PhD, author, environmental lawyer, professor, co-chair of Vancouver’s Greenest City Action Team

  ----------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 8, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Standing Committee on Rules, Regulations, Private Bills and Privileges, 9:30AM, online at Legislative Assembly website and Facebook page
Topic: further consideration to rule changes

"The committee will meet to continue its consideration of the following: Motion No. 71 (Motion respecting hybrid proceedings of the House); rule changes relating to the new parliamentary calendar and sitting hours, and other potential rule changes.
The buildings of the parliamentary precinct remain closed to the public. The meeting will be live-streamed on the Legislative Assembly's website and Facebook page."
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/
https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

Farm Centre Legacy Garden Thanksgiving Sale, 2-5:30PM, Farm Centre back parking lot, 420 University Avenue, Charlottetown.
For sale:
-Garlic ($20 for 1 pound, $40 for 2 pounds, $50 for 3 pounds)
-Tomatoes: Roma and Mountain Merit ($1.50 per pound)
-Tomato Seconds ($1.00 per pound)
-Green Tomatoes ($1.00 per pound)
-Legacy Apples ($2.00 per pound)
-Asian Pears ($2.00 per pound)
-Hardy Kiwis ($7.00/pint)
-Tomatillos ($2.50 per pound)
-Winter squash: butternut, acorn, kabocha... ($2.00 per pound)
-Dried herbs: Basil, parsley, sage ($3.00 per 20g)
AND wreaths graciously donated by Yanira Greener for sale for your Thanksgiving decor. 

Webinar: Grow Great Garlic with Stephanie Dewar, 7PM, online and free.
The title says it all, and Fall is a great time to plant garlic.

Zoom Registration Link
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/74375008130?pwd=SVhwekloN25LVDlVQjRjNkJGTGNJZz09&fbclid=IwAR28qezrzlb3ysa5lTt4kYhI_TTptkZOHO-ZsHnjQGK-aJJLpxcLGm44bQ4#success

Webinar: Fermenting the Harvest: Pickling without Canning, 9:30-11PM, hosted by University of British Columbia, $15 fee.

"Join Chef and Holistic Nutritionist, Andrea Potter of Rooted Nutrition, demonstration how to make pickled vegetables, perfectly crisp and preserved- without canning! Fermentation is a food preservation technique, older than canning technology (with an even better record of food safety!) with all the added benefits of adding loads of probiotics, digestive enzymes and more! This class is a Fermenting Vegetables 101, giving you hands-on experience in making a jar of fermented pickled vegetables, enabling you to pickle nearly anything that pops up in your garden! In this workshop, participants will be welcomed and encouraged (but not required) to make the product(s) during the workshop. An ingredient list will be sent in advance."  Note there is a $15 fee. To register:
https://ubcfarm.ubc.ca/events/event/online-fermenting-the-harvest-pickling-without-canning/


Edith Perry calls it: https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/letter-greed-and-arrogance-504498/

LETTER: Greed and arrogance - The Guardian Letter to the Editor

Published on Thursday, October 1st, 2020

Flying under the pandemic radar are two scenarios reeking of capitalist arrogance and audacity.

Thanks to the alertness of Gerard Gallant and Michael Page who, in recent letters to the editor, warn us of two situations Canadians need to be concerned about.

In one case a group of for-profit health-care business types is lobbying the Alberta Conservative government to help build a privately owned surgical hospital in Edmonton. Yes, a private, for-profit hospital. Not a clinic, a hospital. They want taxpayers to help pay for the building of it.

In the other situation Husky Oil is pressuring the federal Canadian government to invest in its East Coast off-shore drilling project. Yes, they want taxpayers to put our money into their project intended to make themselves, not the taxpayers, money. And this in the face of over supply of oil in the world market and increases in alternative energy sources.

The hypocrisy of these believers in the free market business model, never mind their greed and arrogance, takes one's breath away. Why, if they want the unfettered ability to do business without any or minimal government controls, do they want our public tax dollars to help them make their 100 per cent profits? Free market should also mean no public money for their private interests.

Someone once coined the term “corporate welfare bums”. I call them greedy entitled brats!

Edith Perry, Millview


Met Opera Presents Richard Wagner

Wagner’s Das Rheingold, until tonight at 6:30PM
Starring Christa Ludwig, Siegfried Jerusalem, James Morris, and Ekkehard Wlaschiha. From April 23, 1990.
Wagner’s Die Walküre, tonight 7:30PM until Friday about 6:30PM
Starring Hildegard Behrens, Jessye Norman, Christa Ludwig, Gary Lakes, James Morris, and Kurt Moll. From April 8, 1989.  The doomed couple Siegmund and Sieglinde, Brunhilde the Valkyrie, and a Wagnerian Ring of Fire!   It's probably the most popular of the quartet.  Just under four hours.


Global Chorus essay for October 8
Clare Delaney


We live on the most perfect planet. Our “pale blue dot” to quote Carl Sagan. It is perfectly positioned in space to give us everything we need to sustain diverse life. Similar perfection is hard to find.

Despite this, we extract, transport and burn fossil fuels at an unprecedented rate. We don’t account for the external costs (pollution and its associated health problems, disposal and waste) that go into producing energy, products and “growth” as we currently define it. Our centralized food production system doesn’t consider the environmental cost of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, animal welfare and habitat destruction.

Collective suicide is not factored into annual profit reports.

Large corporations are by no means the only problem. We know that we must reduce carbon emissions if we are to avoid catastrophic climate change. Yet the biggest emitters – China, USA, Russia, India, Japan – will not meet those requirements. Japan will actually increase emissions, as will Australia and Canada.

Most countries are run by politicians who are frequently tied to and dependent on corporate capitalism. By necessity, politicians think short-term (the next election). A decision that is good for the planet but may cost them votes, is political suicide.

And then there’s the general populace. You and me. We’re concerned with jobs and money. We also think short-term. Sure, save the planet, but don’t inconvenience me or make me pay more.

Rampant capitalism, powerful corporations, politicians dependent on votes, and a predominantly uncaring population. It’s a deadly combination. Said Albert Einstein bluntly: “We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive.”

Even with so many passionately showing us the error of our ways, do we have sufficient commitment to make the necessary radical changes to save our beautiful – and fragile – pale blue dot?

Are we “fiddling while Rome burns”?

It’s time to recognize that dramatic change is, quite simply, essential for our survival.

We have a small window of opportunity to mend our ways before it is too late.

Join the global chorus for action.

Because the alternative – the destruction of our perfect planet, our dot in infinity – is just too final to contemplate.

       — Clare Delaney, environmentalist, sustainable living writer, speaker, founder of EcoFriendlyLink


Very much to read at her website and blog:

https://www.ecofriendlylink.com/blog/
--------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 7, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Standing Committee on Health and Social Development, 1:30PM, livestreamed on the Legislative Assembly website and Facebook page

Topic: Recruitment and retention during the COVID-19 pandemic

The committee will meet with Health PEI (Rebecca Gill and Lori Ellis) to discuss the impact of the pandemic on recruitment/retention and plans going forward.

"Audio and video recordings of the meeting and a transcript of same will later be made publicly available as well."

---------------------------
Webinar:  A Guide to New Brunswick Tree Identification, 3:30PM
"Join (New Brunswick) Nature Trust board member and forester, David Palmer, for a free, family-friendly webinar about tree identification. During this 1-hour webinar, you will learn the best practices on identifying trees by looking at the bark, leaves, textures, and more...This webinar is a part of our digital Passport to Nature, a series of educational webinars and videos...
*If you cannot attend this webinar live, a recording will be available.
"

Registration link at the Facebook event page


Checking in with the Maritime Nature Trusts, our regional trusty treasures, and treasure-protectors:

Nova Scotia Nature Trust got an amazing bequeath of a unique oceanfront property and more unique contents which is basically to be sold and the profits given to them for land conservation:
https://globalnews.ca/news/7374465/customized-once-in-a-lifetime-home-in-port-lhebert-n-s-left-to-nature-trust/

Customized ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ home in Port L’Hebert, N.S., left to Nature Trust - Global News post by Karla Renic

Published on Friday, October 2nd, 2020

Nova Scotia Nature Trust says the sale proceeds of a home filled with hand-carved woodwork in Shelburne County have been gifted to the charity.


from the Royal LePage real estate listing of the home recently donated to the Nova Scotia Nature Trust, by Mr. "Ray: Titterington, of the cactus solarium and some of his hand-carved wood figurines.
 

In a surprise to the charity, a recently deceased Port L’Hebert resident, Victor “Ray” Titterington, left the entire estate to Nature Trust in his will. Titterington was born in England in 1928. His family moved to Ontario when he was one year old.According to a Nature Trust blog post, Titterington loved outdoor activities and travelling. When he was 36, he quit his job as a tool and die maker and followed an “entrepreneurial life.”

His estate includes a seven-acre oceanfront property. The house is listed as a one-bedroom, one-bathroom home, but also includes a large solarium and full woodworking shop. The solarium is filled with cacti that Titterington cared for in the last few decades of his life, as well as hand-made wooden horses hanging from a carousel-style ceiling.

“He crafted wooden floors and doors piece-by-piece to create an artistic marquetry pattern, embellished bookshelves with fanciful decorative carved horses galloping across the top, and filled an atrium with a wide range of cacti – some of which grew so huge they touched the glass-topped ceiling,” said the Nature Trust blog post. According to a release, the estate has been listed with a Shelburne-native agent for $295,000. The listing offers a virtual tour of the home.
Nature Trust said all proceeds are going to the charity, and it will start reviewing offers on Oct. 9.

-30-
--------------------------------------------------

Island Nature Trust (INT) news: from:  https://www.islandnaturetrust.ca/

Congratulations, Jeanne Maki!
INT was delighted to award the 2020 Hon. J. Angus MacLean Natural Areas Award to nominee Ms. Jeanne Maki. Ms. Maki has spent her adult life working to safeguard one of PEI’s most important and threatened ecosystems: our forests. As a testament to her dedication, she recently designated close to one hundred acres of woodlands in the Pinette-Belfast area as protected natural area under the private stewardship option of the PEI Natural Areas Protection Act.

Also:
New Board Members!  from the INT News page

MARIE-ANN BOWDEN

During her career at the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan, Marie-Ann actively pursued research and teaching in the areas of environmental law, property and water law. Since retiring Professor Emeritus from the College, she has returned to PEI and has joined the Board of the Upton Farmlands Trust and helped secure a new Water Act with her colleagues at the Coalition for the Protection of PEI Waters.

TYLER COADY

Tyler is a Canadian Armed Forces Veteran who has obtained a B.A. Psychology (Honours) at UPEI and an M.A. Military Psychology at Adler University, Chicago. He has several published research articles and has a strong background in behavioural sciences. Combined with work in peer support and crisis negotiations, Tyler helps other veterans reconnect with nature.

ROGER E. COFFIN

Roger spent 20 years in the private sector as a manager and entrepreneur, followed by a career in the public sector that included business support and aerospace recruitment. Roger has been involved with outdoor organizations mainly in the areas of hunting and fishing. Roger is a life member of Margaree Salmon Association, Miramichi Salmon Association and now Island Nature Trust.

GORDON MACKAY

Gordon, who has practiced law since 1980, comes to the Island Nature Trust with extensive personal and professional volunteer experience. He has served as a Commissioner on the Judicial Review Commission (PEI), the Treasurer of the Law Foundation of Prince Edward Island, and President of the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. He has also chaired the Red Cross Multi-Sport Relay and the Prince Edward Island United Way Campaign, as well as the Inspire fundraising campaign of the University of Prince Edward Island.

The other Board of Directors for INT are listed on this page:
https://www.islandnaturetrust.ca/about/board-of-directors/

More News and the recording of their recent Annual General Meeting is here:
https://www.islandnaturetrust.ca/category/news/


Correction:
I was mistaken in thinking the library overdue fees were introduced during the Robert Ghiz/Wes Sheridan years, but it was actually in 2004 under Progressive Conservative Premier Pat Binns and Finance Minister Mitch Murphy, and at that point, P.E.I. was one of the the last provinces to get revenue by punishing late returners/ offer disincentives for not returning items on time. (Thanks to Peter Rukavina for doing some research instead of relying on faulty memories.)    Now P.E.I. is one of the last provinces to drop fees, so things come and go.  I understand the argument that now there isn't any reason to return materials, but that's not quite true --- the library system will still remind people that they have overdue books and that may affect future borrowing privileges.  But they won't relentless follow you like Captain Ahab with a harpoon for that quarter a day you owe. (Not that the kind library people would ever do that, as they never seemed delighted about collecting fees, but the system's racking up of overdue fines was stressful to many without reliable ways to get to branches to return materials.)

Just for fun -- here is the CBC list of other news stories in May 2004 at the end of the article on library fees adoption...everything old is new again....hmm, where are we with the midwives right now on P.E.I.? (see below)



a few months old, but still up-to-date on the midwives situation, unfortunately...

Hospital delivery only: In PEI, midwives are not an option for pregnant women - The Globe and Mail article by Alex Cyr

Published on Monday, April 27th, 2020

Once a week in March, Natalie LeBlanc drove herself to the Prince County Hospital in Summerside for her routine prenatal checkups. She was anxious about COVID-19 and worried about getting sick, but at eight months pregnant, she had no other choice but to check in regularly.

“At that point, the hospital was the last place I wanted to be,” said the 24-year-old first-time mother, whose son, Louie, was born on April 9.

If a midwife was an option in Prince Edward Island, Ms. LeBlanc would have contemplated using one. She says she felt isolated at the hospital during labour with access to just one support person, her partner. She struggled with having no in-person professional care after her discharge – she had to make do with a checkup phone call from PEI’s Department of Health and Wellness.

“Running off three hours of sleep in the last three days and you have to get help over the phone,” she said, “that was really tough.”

PEI is the only province in Canada with no regulated midwives. The province’s Department of Health and Wellness had announced funding for a preliminary midwifery program last fall, but it has yet to be put in place, leaving expectant mothers with no other alternative to giving birth at the hospital during the COVID-19 outbreak.

In all other provinces, midwives are regulated health professionals who provide medical and emotional support to a mother and infant during pregnancy, birth and a postpartum period of at least six weeks. They enable home and hospital births, and they can be a bridge between the mother, infant and other health professionals such as obstetricians or family doctors. The first province to regulate midwifery was Ontario in 1994. In 2016-17, there were 1,690 midwives in Canada who supported more than 42,000 births.

PEI’s 2020-21 provincial budget for the first time included $150,000 for midwifery services and plans to hire a midwifery program co-ordinator, giving some Islanders the impression that services were on their way. In the fall, PEI’s Minister of Health and Wellness James Aylward had told reporters he expected to have some services in place by January, 2020.

In February, however, the Department of Health and Wellness announced that more steps, such as developing program guidelines and regulations, had to happen before the program could start. Mr. Aylward recently declared the program deferred indefinitely, as a result of COVID-19.

Since the start of the outbreak, PEI midwife-advocacy group BORN has received many questions about whether midwives would be rushed into the health care system to meet the needs of some families. In response, the group founded a bi-weekly virtual postpartum support group, said BORN member and doula Megan Burnside.

“We saw there was a need for personal support right now on the Island,” Ms. Burnside said. “There’s a bit of a sense of panic for expectant families, because they don’t know what the situation will be when they enter the hospital.”

Luckily, PEI’s hospitals have not so far been overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients. As of Wednesday, there were two active COVID-19 cases in the province. But the possibility of contracting the virus still exists for mothers and babies.

Amy-Mae Jewell, a third-year midwifery student at Toronto’s Ryerson University, is from Covehead, PEI. She is saddened that midwifery is not established in her home province, as she sees ways in which it could help families stay safe as the pandemic lingers.

“Midwives can enable mothers and their babies to stay at home and not contract the virus. When the baby is born in a hospital right now, they can be very vulnerable.”

Canada has seen a spike in demand for midwifery services since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak. In Toronto, midwifery practices had reported a jump in intake from women who want to avoid hospital deliveries in early April. Around that time, 25 per cent to 50 per cent of clients at the Midwives Collective in Victoria who had planned for a hospital birth inquired about a home birth.

In March, the Nova Scotia Association of Midwives received a spike in requests for information about birthing outside hospitals. Yet, on March 30, Nova Scotia suspended home births until April 30, in a bid to curb the spread of the virus and protect midwives and birth attendants.

Ms. Jewell said keeping midwives and patients safe could have been done in other ways.  “They could have assigned some midwives in the hospitals and others for home care to prevent crossover,” she said.

-30-


Opera Video-streaming:

Wagner’s Tannhäuser, today until 6:30PM
Starring Eva-Maria Westbroek, Michelle DeYoung, Johan Botha, Peter Mattei, and Günther Groissböck.  From October 31, 2015. About "... the minnesinger torn between earthly passion and true love." Including an appearance by Venus. In under four hours.

The Ring Cycle begins!
the first of the four:
Wagner’s Das Rheingold, tonight 7:30PM until Thursday 6:30PM
Starring Christa Ludwig, Siegfried Jerusalem, James Morris, and Ekkehard Wlaschiha. From April 23, 1990. Lump of magic gold, teasing Rhinemaidens, spurned and furious dwarf steals it; the gods are building their dream-castle but defaulting on the loan and need some gold....what could go wrong?

And in case you need a refresher, in a very accurate and definitely tongue-in-check way, here is Dame Anna Russell with her twenty minutes of piano, singing and fun, from 1984.


Paul Beckwith, the Global Chorus contributor, has a website:

Paul Beckwith, Climate System Scientist
https://paulbeckwith.net/
which is very active and recent (postings just this week) and the Summary is thus:

Summary

Well known and respected creator of entertaining and comprehensible videos of sometimes daunting subjects, especially in climate system science, meteorology, oceanography and Earth Sciences at YouTube. Frequently called upon for commentary by fellow educators, activists, and public. Physicist, Engineer, and part-time professor at the University of Ottawa. His primary interest is joining-the-dots on Abrupt Climate System Change to determine where we are heading, and how fast, and what it all means for us and our amazing planet.


Global Chorus essay for October 7
Paul Beckwith


Abrupt climate change. It is happening today, big time. We have changed the chemistry of our atmosphere with fossil fuel emissions. Climate system statistics are now different. Rates of change have surpassed tipping points. Extreme weather events are skyrocketing in frequency, intensity and duration. Societal and economic costs are already substantial and are rapidly accelerating. Oceans are acidifying. Global food supplies are threatened. We are still at very early stages. Climate change is just getting warmed up.

Powerful feedbacks have caused enormous Arctic temperature amplification with exponential collapse of sea ice and snow cover. Thawing terrestrial and subsea permafrost is releasing ever-increasing amounts of powerful climate-warming methane. Atmospheric circulation patterns without guidance from stable jet streams are water vapour turbocharged from increased evaporation. Regions unlucky in our new climate casino are inundated by torrential rainfall and becoming water-worlds. Or baked from persistent heat waves and drought and fires exploding in size, frequency and severity. Or buried by snow and ice storms. Lives are in turmoil. Infrastructure like houses, roads, train tracks and pipelines are being hammered.

What next? There is no new normal. Far from it. We have lost our stable familiar climate. Likely permanently. Rates of change greatly exceed anything recorded in paleo-records. By at least 10 to 30 times. Greenland and Antarctic ice caps are melting and calving at unprecedented and accelerating rates. Large chunks will soon slide into the ocean causing tsunamis and abrupt sea level rise, swamping coastlines. We are heading to a much warmer world. Abruptly. Within decades. The transition will be brutal for civilization. Global flora and fauna face a sixth mass extinction.

There is hope. Knowledge of this climate threat is spreading widely to our society that has been brainwashed into inaction by fossil fuel corporations and their subservient governments who maintain the status quo. More and more people see trees dying in their backyards. Devastation to their houses, roads and cities from extreme weather events is awakening them to the grave dangers. Soon a threshold will be crossed and a tipping point reached in human behaviour. A wisdom reached on the reality of the risks that we face. And finally global concerted action. To slash emissions and embrace renewable energies. And change our ways. And retool our economies and reset our priorities. And not take our life on this planet for granted.

      — Paul Beckwith, part-time professor of climatology/meteorology at University of Ottawa (Canada)

-----------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 6, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Order deadline:
Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup:
https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/

-------------------------------------------
There are no Standing Committee meetings on the schedule for today. If you wish to catch up on any committee meetings from previous weeks, start here:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/calendar
-------------------------------------------------
Green Party of PEI nomination meeting tonight for District 10:Charlottetown-Winsloe, 7:30PM, Irish Cultural Centre (formerly the BIS), with the only candidate Chris van Ouwerkerk.
More info on watching online:
https://www.greenparty.pe.ca/nominationsd10
--------------------------------------
Thursday, November 12, 2020, 2PM:
"The fall session of the legislature will continue the regular business of the 1st Session of the 66th General Assembly."


From The other Guardian:

PM windmills in – Boris Johnson will promise to power every UK home from offshore wind by 2030 and make the pandemic a catalyst for green growth. In a speech to the virtual Tory party conference today he is due to say the government is banking on a clean energy future to create jobs,
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/oct/05/boris-johnson-to-unveil-plan-to-power-all-uk-homes-with-wind-by-2030?


This stuck with me, after all the events "down south" in the last seven days, and as we work outside getting ready for Fall and Winter....https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/regional-perspectives/russell-wangersky-walk-away-re-energize-re-engage-504629/

RUSSELL WANGERSKY: Walk away, re-energize, re-engage - The Guardian column by Russell Wangersky

Published on Thursday, October 1st, 2020

Thoughts on a morning after a neighbouring nation bends ever closer to hatred.

Sometimes you have to walk away, shake your head, regroup. Not to give up the fight, but take a break from it. Maybe go to a familiar place you can conjure up easily in your head, if for no other reason than to try and recapture its necessary calm.

Do your best to make something beautiful.

Awake at 5 a.m., windows open, out of town so not a sound except the wind, and the way it batters the screens like the flat of a hand.

Soon, there are crows calling in the hot, moist air: I’m always taken by the way, when they walk away from you as you approach, you can speak softly to them and they’ll stop, tilt their heads as if listening, and sometimes cancel their departure altogether. As if, while they don’t actually understand words, they at least recognize tone of voice. Do it for long enough and it’s pretty clear they remember you, too. 

Later, measuring-tape therapy: trying to make sense of the numbers washes everything else out of my head. Calculating the length of one-by-six trim boards I’ll need to trim out two side-by-side single-pane windows with a divider between them, based on a 53-inch horizontal opening that’s going to be 26 and a half inches high. Carpenters would measure twice, cut once: I measure many times, write the numbers in note form, draw a diagram of the whole process just to be sure. (I’ll check the measurements again later, knowing I’ll still probably make a mistake here or there.)

In front of the house, my new square of concrete is done curing, and hot in the sun, it’s both an exploration zone and rock desert for small, visiting grasshoppers. They spring away quickly, their jumps higher and much longer than off the more springy turf and grass. I measure some more, draw arcane and confusing scrap-paper pictures that will no doubt be my most lasting contribution to the world. (The will certainly be the hardest to decipher. Otherwise, I’m pretty much an open book.)

Stop for water. Cold, clean well water is an underappreciated thing.

Out to the garden, where I wasn’t expecting much, frankly. I dream of a crop of potatoes, but rarely get what I’d like.

This year, though, a new, more thorough spring preparation of the soil — plenty of peat, seaweed and wheelbarrows of soft dark compost — has made a softer bed than the clay soil I’m used to, and the few short rows of potatoes are freakishly successful, more than 20 pounds of them in the end, large, clean spuds — not to mention a richly pungent array of brown-skinned onions as well.

Later still, elbows-deep in tide-line rotting kelp, filling buckets with it to turn into the garden. Small sea life squirms and wriggles away from the air and the sunlight, and the iodine smell of the kelp is sheer magic, a dense smell that is almost a taste all by itself.

It’s wet and slimy and rotten and glorious all at once. I load the car, go away, come back and do it all over again. Brown seaweed, red, yellow, light and dark green — in ruffles and fronds and shapes that would be fascinating to see underwater, undulating in the waves. 

I believe almost all people are good, deep down. I also believe that many of us are exhausted: physically, psychologically, emotionally. And there are also people who are more than willing to take advantage of that.

Walk away, recharge, come back ready. There’s suddenly a lot to be done in this world.

Russell Wangersky’s column appears in SaltWire newspapers and websites across Atlantic Canada. He can be reached at russell.wangersky@thetelegram.com

-30-


Operatics, from the good, talented people at The Met:

Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde, tonight until 6:30PM
Starring Nina Stemme, Ekaterina Gubanova, Stuart Skelton, Evgeny Nikitin, and René Pape, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle. From October 8, 2016. Celtic star-crossed lovers, this one set in more modern times.

Wagner’s Tannhäuser, tonight 7:30pMuntil Wednesday 6:30PM
Starring Eva-Maria Westbroek, Michelle DeYoung, Johan Botha, Peter Mattei, and Günther Groissböck. From October 31, 2015.  Redemption through grace...and about four hours of gorgeous singing.....


Global Chorus essay for October 6 
David Helwig


Enduring Prophecy
Geography abandons itself to history;
cities afloat on the fires of the infinite
falter in the elisions of our knowing.

Who will whistle the lovely notes of the bobolink,
the meadows lost? Who will warranty
the exactly certain doom of our gardens?

Beneath the wild leaves of metaphor
wind and grass and ocean shallows
seed futures which will come or not come.

Unease kindles beyond the half-life of certainties.
We try to believe our grandchildren will forgive us
if we bless them and abandon thinking.

The inevitable rises like a great food.

       —David Helwig, CM, former poet laureate of Prince Edward Island (Canada), author of over 40 books, including The Stand-In, The Year One and The Names of Things


www.davidhelwig.com

-------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 5, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Order deadline for local food options this week:
OrganicVeggieDeliver, order by tonight for Friday delivery.  Info at: https://www.organicveggiedelivery.com/
Charlottetown Farmers' Market to Go, Tuesday noon for Thursday delivery/pickup: https://cfm2go.localfoodmarketplace.com/
Eat Local PEI -- Online Farmers' Market order by Wednesday midnight for Saturday pickup/delivery: https://www.localline.ca/eatlocalpei


Main Editorial  (P.E.I.) Guardian https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/regional-perspectives/editorial-hands-off-water-supply-in-futures-trading-504623/

EDITORIAL: Hands off water supply in futures trading - The Guardian Main Editorial

Published on Friday, October 2nd, 2020

So, you’re interested in the futures market.

It’s a dandy little place where you can make or lose a lot of money very fast, betting on where prices for commodities like wheat or oil are going to go in a set period of time.

You buy now a commodity at one price with a plan for delivery or to sell at a set point of time in the future — if the sale price goes up over what you paid, you win.

What are commodities? Well, unprocessed goods like oil, wheat, cocoa, soybeans, gold, pork bellies — essentially, all sorts of raw materials.

Futures trading even has its own world of language; there’s hardly enough space here to explain contango (it sounds like a dance, but it isn’t one) and backwardation — it’s enough to say they are opposites of one another, and involve the market’s view of where the spot price of energy is going. Crack spread — cramming — head-and-shoulders — Henry Hub — Iceberg order. Suffice to say, if you don’t know what they all mean and how the system works, you probably shouldn’t be dipping your financial toes in it.

Not if you like your toes.

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be concerned about the futures trading business.

Because futures trading just took something of a dark turn. Dark, that is, if you’re not, say, a futures trader, but are instead interested in the fundamental rights of people.

Wall Street is about to start trading futures contracts on fresh water.

The goal seems reasonable enough. The idea behind the water futures exchange is to let big water users like almond farmers — or even cities — in drought-stricken places like California buy water in advance at a set price. Essentially, it would let big users “hedge” against big increases in price that might appear if supplies of water tighten dramatically. Essentially, those users would have already bought water for a set delivery at a set price, protecting them against unexpected price spikes.

The users won’t actually buy physical water that they have to store. As the Wall Street Journal explains, citing high summer water prices in California, “Had there been water futures, a farmer who bought summer-dated futures at the prevailing price months earlier could have pocketed big profits when drought hit and prices soared. Those gains could then be used to offset the higher cost of buying actual water.”

Sounds good, right?

Well, no.

There might be things that just shouldn’t be cash commodities — particularly fresh water. The feeling on the market is that water will get more valuable as climate change drives drought in many agricultural areas. And, if it gets more valuable, the people who have money will be the ones who can afford it.

Eventually on that road, what about the little guy who just needs a drink?

-30-


from The (U.K.) Guardian:

Tom talks – Capt Sir Tom Moore, the centenarian propelled to fame for his efforts to raise funds for the NHS, is to become the UK’s oldest podcaster today when he launches a national campaign to tackle loneliness among older people. The Covid crisis has worsened the isolation felt by many elderly people but the new campaign aims to encourage people to “donate their words” and have a meaningful conversation with an older person.


Atlantic Skies for October 5th-11th, 2020 "-A Celestial Challenge" by Glenn K. Roberts

While, from time to time, I have highlighted the various major seasonal constellations, in hopes that, not only will you learn where to look for them in the night sky during the appropriate season, but also that you may find some amusement in the stories behind them, this week, I thought I might pose a celestial challenge for you, by listing a half-dozen very minor constellations, and letting you locate them in the night sky. They should all be relatively easy to spot from a dark site away from city lights under a clear, cloudless sky, once your eyes have dark-adjusted (after about 15 - 30 minutes, depending on your age). Try spotting them first with your naked-eye, but if you can't make them out (or only some of the stars in the constellation), you can use binoculars, if you have any. If you can't get outside, or if each night is cloudy, become an armchair astronomer for the night, and look them up on-line via Google (which will also likely provide you with a location chart). First though, if at all possible, try the challenge with your own eyes. All the listed constellations will be visible in the night sky during this coming week (weather permitting) between the hours of 8 - 10 p.m.

The first constellation to look for is Lacerta - the Lizard, located between Cygnus - the Swan and Andromeda - the Princess (N sky). The second is Vulpecula - the Little Fox, between Cygnus and Aquila - the Eagle (WSW sky). Also between these two constellations is the third constellation to find, Sagitta - the Arrow. Number four is Triangulum - the Triangle, between Aries - the Ram and Andromeda (E sky). The fifth constellation on the list is Camelopardalis  - the Giraffe (and you thought it was the Camel), fairly close to the North Star, between Ursa Major - the Great Bear (low on the northern horizon) and Cassiopeia - the Queen (NE sky). The final constellation to find will be Equuleus - the Little Horse/Foal,  located to the lower right of Sagitta, next to the head of Pegasus - the Winged Horse (SSW sky).  I'll even throw in a bonus constellation (which I wrote about a short while ago), Delphinus - the Dolphin (SSW sky, between Vulpecula and Equuleus). Once you've found all these constellations, perhaps you'll be intrigued enough to search them on-line, and learn how they got their names, and how they came to be placed in the night sky. However, if you can't find them on-line (perhaps you don't have access to a computer), and do want to know more about them, just email me, and I'll be happy to provide the information. If it's cloudy this week, look for them next week. Good luck. let me know how you made out.

While you're out looking for the above constellations, you might want to also look for a number of early evening planets as well.  The first two early evening planets to watch for will be Jupiter and Saturn. Jupiter will be the most readily visible planet, shining at mag. -2.35 on the 5th (mag. -2.31 by 11th), 20 degrees (21 degrees by 11th) above the southern horizon around 7:05 p.m. (6:50 p.m. by 11th). Jupiter reaches its highest point in the evening sky around 7:30 p.m. (7:10 by 11th), 21 degrees above the southern horizon, remaining observable until about 10:50 pm. (10:25 p.m. by 11th), after which it drops below 7 degrees above the south-west horizon. Saturn (mag. +0.49; +0.52 by 11th) is visible around 7:20 p.m.(7:10 by 11th), 21 degrees (22 degrees on the 11th) above the southern horizon as dusk fades to darkness. It is highest in the late evening sky 22 degrees above the southern horizon around 8:25 p.m. (7:40 p.m. by 11th), remaining observable until about 11:05 p.m. (10:40 by 11th), after which time is sinks below 10 degrees above south-west horizon. Mars (mag. -2.56; - 2.62 by 11th) makes a bright appearance (actually brighter than Jupiter now) in the east, 7 degrees above the eastern horizon shortly after 8 p.m. (7:35 p.m. by 11th), reaching its highest point 49 degrees above the southern horizon around 1:45 a.m. (1:15 a.m. on 11th), before being  lost to the dawn twilight about 7 a.m. (6:50 a.m. by 11th). Venus (mag. -4.07; -4.05 by 11th) is visible in the pre-dawn sky, rising in the east around 3:45 a.m. (4 a.m. by 11th). Our "morning star" reaches its highest point 31 degrees above the eastern horizon before fading with the dawn around 7 a.m. (7:10 a.m. on the 11th). Mercury remains difficult to see low in the western sky just after sunset.

Until next week, clear skies.

Events:

Oct. 6 - Mars at apogee (farthest from Earth)

        9 - Last Quarter Moon


Met Opera video streaming

Have a big slice of Black Forest Cake as this week is Wagner Week!
Mozart’s Idomeneo, tonight until 6:30PM

Starring Elza van den Heever, Nadine Sierra, Alice Coote, Matthew Polenzani, and Alan Opie. From March 25, 2017.

Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. tonight 7:30PM until 6:30PM tomorrow

Starring Nina Stemme, Ekaterina Gubanova, Stuart Skelton, Evgeny Nikitin, and René Pape, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle. From October 8, 2016.  Four hours and a bit.


Global Chorus essay for October 5
Gary Hirshberg

Self-interest. It’s our greatest threat and yet also our greatest hope.
Self-interest has led us to ignore our “externalities” – the direct consequences of our economic behaviours that we then leave of our balance sheets and income statements as if they don’t exist.
The bad news is that most of these outcomes – toxification, depletion of biodiversity and natural resources, climate change, cancer rates – have worsened. And this may be history’s first generation to live shorter lives than their parents.
But therein lies the good news. The very same self-interest that got us into most of these messes is probably the only hope to get ourselves and our planet back to good health. Climate events have displaced millions and cost billions. The President’s Cancer Panel reports that 41 per cent of us will be diagnosed with cancers from exposure to chemicals in our foods, air and water. Disappearing pollinators pose serious risks to farmers and food prices. These are not just statistics. We are all being touched. We feel fear, hardship and pain.

And pain will makes us change. Because it is in our self-interest to do so. I have hope because I have seen that ecology is really long-term economics. That healthy soil sequesters carbon and produces higher yields. And biodiversity controls pests better than chemicals. That the cheapest form of healthcare is not getting sick. And food is better when Nature’s rules are followed.
When it comes to expediting our evolution, pain is a good catalyst.
     —Gary Hirshberg, co-founder and chairman of Stonyfield Farm, chair of the Just Label It! campaign

justlabelit.org

  A YouTube about his quest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=coZsLw216GM

--------------------------------------
essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 4, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

"Remember: transformation is not a linear process; it can happen all at once." 

     -- from Norie Huddle in today's Global Chorus essay


even thought that was written in 2013 or so for Todd E. MacLean's anthology, it strikes as relevant in these times,

Events:

Downtown Farmers' Market, 11AM-4PM, Lower Queen Street, Charlottetown.  This week and next are the final weeks, and there is a lot of produce that you can get fresh now, plus crafts and prepared food.

Local Food: "Bulk-It-Up!" ordering opportunity:  Soleil's Organic Veggies has a Fall ordering form available, until midnight tonight, for pick-up later next week, LINK here
(if the link does not work, you should be able to search for the key words and find it.)

Various Apple U-picks are open today and this week.
Some info from the PEI Apple Growers' Association:
http://islandapples.com/
and on Facebook (but this is not very up-to-date, you may want to check pages for individual places):

https://www.facebook.com/islandapples/


News from Saturday:

Federal Green Party Leader 
Annamie Paul has won the leadership of the Green Party of Canada.


https://www.greenparty.ca/en/leader

Very detailed "Sunday read" story at CBC website, here:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/green-party-new-leader-1.5749648

Toronto lawyer Annamie Paul elected leader of the federal Green Party, running in "Bill Morneau's old riding" of Toronto Centre in the byelection Monday, October  


Provincial District 10: Charlottetown-Winsloe nominees/interested people/candidates so far:

Zack Bell for the PCs (Guardian article below)
Chris van Ouwerkerk running for the Green Party, and their nominating meeting will be Tuesday night
Lynne Thiele is running for NDP  

------------------------------

Guardian story: https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/provincial/zack-bell-wins-hotly-contested-pc-nomination-in-district-10-505383/

Zack Bell wins hotly contested P.E.I. PC nomination in District 10 - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Saturday, October 3rd, 2020

Former Hot 105.5 radio personality Zack Bell has won the Progressive Conservative nomination in District 10, Charlottetown-Winsloe.

Bell, now a sales representative with Kenmac Energy, defeated two challengers for the nomination - Early Childhood Development Association executive director Sonya Hooper and Sherwood Elementary School educational assistant Susie Dillon.

A total of 398 votes were cast in the nomination contest at the former Sherwood BMR location over the course of Friday and Saturday. Bell won the vote on the second ballot of the vote, held via preferential ballot.

PC officials did not release details of how many votes Bell, or any of the other candidates, garnered in the contest.

In a speech after the results were announced, Bell pledged to work hard for the residents of Charlottetown-Winsloe. He also praised his rivals Hooper and Dillon. 

"District 10 should be impressed to have the other two candidates. They were incredible in this campaign."

"I know we can come out of this as a unified force to ensure that District 10 has a strong PC voice in the P.E.I. legislature."

In an interview, Bell did not single out a particular local issue he hoped to highlight if he becomes an MLA. He said residents of the district have expressed concerns about healthcare and education.

“It is a very difficult time right now for a lot of people. I do think that a collaborative approach is the right way," Bell said.

Former Liberal MLA Robert Mitchell stepped down from his role as District 10's representative in the legislature earlier in September. A byelection call could come at any time.

The PC’s have been well ahead of the provincial Green and Liberal parties in recent polls, due in part to voter confidence in the performance of Premier Dennis King during the COVID-19 pandemic.

But in a speech, King downplayed speculation that he might call a general province-wide election in order to capitalize on his political popularity.

“I've read and heard many pundits talking about how they see these things going and apparently about how I'm craving and salivating some type of monstrous majority government,” King said.

“What has demonstrated any desire to see that actually happen? We have been focused solely on doing what is best for Prince Edward Islanders and that won't change."

Although King has expressed pride in working with opposition parties, a win for King’s party in District 10 would mean his party has a majority in the legislature. The PC’s would no longer require the support of the Greens or Liberals to pass confidence motions, if a majority of votes are secured with the support of the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly, PC MLA Colin LaVie.

But King said he would still work with other parties if Bell wins the byelection.

"If he is to get elected, we would still need other parties to support legislation," King said.

"As a former political watcher and observer and commentator, it would be very, very bad political advice for me to change the way we do things."

King added he hoped to call a byelection in time to see the representative of Charlottetown-Winsloe sit in the Legislature during the upcoming fall session, slated to begin November 12.

Earlier on Saturday, the NDP nominated Lynne Thiele as their candidate in the district. Zac Murphy has been acclaimed as the candidate for the Liberals.

The Provincial Greens have not nominated a candidate.

On Saturday the party announced plans to hold their nomination meeting on Tuesday, October 6.

-30-
(sorry for any formatting errors)


Jane Goodall and World Animal Day, October 4th


   https://news.janegoodall.org/2017/10/04/6-great-ways-celebrate-world-animal-day/

Some background, written by a Youth Member of the Jane Goodall Institute, and published in 2017, but still relevant today:

World Animal Day is celebrated in all corners of the world, from the United States, to Sudan, to Nepal. The first World Animal Day was organized in 1925 by a man named Heinrich Zimmermann to promote the protection of all animals, domestic or wild. The mission today is to “raise the status of animals in order to improve welfare standards around the globe.” With looming statistics around species loss highlighting what has been termed “the Sixth Great Extinction,” endangered protections (like the Endangered Species Act) under threat, and animals still suffering under poor conditions of treatment, today is a day to do something positive for the rest of the animal kingdom!

Zimmermann, a writer and publisher of Mensch und Hund (Man and Dog) magazine, was born in Germany and was a passionate animal rights advocate. Zimmermann chose the date of October 4th as it is the day of the Christian Saint Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals and ecology.  In 1925, Zimmermann organized the first World Animal Day event at the Sport Palace in Berlin, which was attended by over 5,000 people! Such participation is a great indicator of how people can come together to act on behalf of animal welfare, though there are challenges.

Through the centuries, humans have compromised animal welfare and species protection for a number of reasons. Whether it be destroying natural habitats for new buildings or agriculture, or testing chemicals on animals to determine whether the substance is safe for human use, humans have rarely prioritized animals. Species such as the orangutan are losing their habitat due to rapid palm oil farming in an effort to fulfill the demands of consumers. The wild chimpanzee, one animal closest to our hearts, is the victim of habitat loss due to development and logging along with poaching for the illegal bushmeat and pet trade. The purpose of World Animal Day is to bring these issues to light and to provide effective protection for species worldwide.
<snip> 

More at the LINK.


Opera anytime: Metropolitan Opera free video streaming

Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, until 6:30PM tonight
Starring Renée Fleming, Cecilia Bartoli, Susanne Mentzer, Dwayne Croft, and Bryn Terfel.  From November 11, 1998.  A beautiful production and snapshot of over twenty years ago.

Mozart’s Idomeneo, available tonight 7:30PM until about 6:30PM Monday
 From March 25, 2017. Mozart's early masterpiece...."Tenor Matthew Polenzani brings both steely resolve and compassionate warmth to the title king of Crete, who is faced with an impossible decision. With her rich mezzo-soprano, Alice Coote sings the trouser role of Idomeneo’s son Idamante, who loves the Trojan princess Ilia, sung with delicate lyricism by Nadine Sierra. Elza van den Heever gives a thrillingly unhinged portrayal of the jealous Elettra."   Deeply engrossing, and of course the music!


So much to address about Global Chorus writer Norie Huddle's endeavors, as it relates to the beautiful work of Martin Rutte with Project Heaven on Earth (which this newsletter will revisit in the coming days), and to the idea of nature having rights, as Norie and her partner worked on in Ecuador.

Here is a bit more about that:
https://therightsofnature.org/ecuador-rights/

and this is related to the concept of the Environmental Bill of Rights, which I could certainly get, and then give, a refresher on, as it is related to David Suzuki and the Blue Dot movement, and environmental rights both local and beyond.


Global Chorus essay for October 4 
Norie Huddle


Yes, we can transform ourselves, all of humanity – and do it very rapidly and enjoyably.

Remember: transformation is not a linear process; it can happen all at once.

To survive and thrive as a species, to heal the Earth and ourselves, we have a big job ahead of us and must come together as never before to support and empower and cheer on one another. How grateful I am for all that you are doing – and how grateful I am for our partnership in the Great Work ahead.

Be connected, be authentic, breathe with awareness, be flexible and open, remember that we’re all students and all teachers, find the perfection in the moment, feel and express gratitude, follow your bliss, be kind, inform yourself, grow in your capacity for love and contribution, collaborate wholeheartedly and cheerfully, create beauty.

Thank you so much for doing your part! Together we can do what no one of us can do alone.

Love and Blessings.

        — Norie Huddle, author, public speaker, consultant, artist www.gardenofparadise.net and www.butterflyblessings.net

---------------------------------------------------
essay from:

Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 3, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:
Farmers' Markets open inside in Summerside (9AM-1PM) and outside in Charlottetown (8AM-1PM)

Island New Democrats and
Island Progressive Conservatives
choose their nominee for the District 10:Charlottetown-Winsloe byelection which will likely get called very soon.

Lynne Thiele is running for the NDP, meeting at Kings Square at
Thiele is an author, educator, and social activist, and has held many roles in the Island NDP.  An informal gathering is set for 11AM at Kings Square in Charlottetown.


There are three candidates for the PC space, with the meeting wrapping up today at the former Sherwood BMR store (former Do It Centre) at 423 Mt. Edward Road. 
----------------------------------------
Green Party Federal convention and Leadership Race Watch Party, gathering starting at 6:30PM, Water's Edge Restaurant, Delta Hotel, Charlottetown.  You may recall the Green Party Convention was planned for Charlottetown, and it would have been quite the event.
Space is limited, to check Facebook event link for reservation information.
Facebook event link

--------------------------
Tomorrow, Sunday, October 4th:
Fermentation Celebration, 12noon-4PM, Heart Beet Organics Farm,742  Darlington Road in Darlingtron.
Entry charge. Ferments like krauts and kimchi and kombucha for tasting, etc.  Covid-19 guidelines followed.  Limited space, see Facebook event link for more information


Long-Overdue (ha!) News

"PEI public library card holders will no longer have to pay a fee for library materials that are returned late, plus all outstanding overdue fees will be waived."  Starting October 1st, 2020.

This is long-overdue (ha!) news.  Sounds like P.E.I. was one of the last provinces to drop this nickel-and-diming of readers. While we all should be considerate and return materials when we are done, charging people appears to disproportionately affect those without easy transportation abilities... those same people who tend to use the library for many reasons.  I do remember when the fines were brought in, I think during the days Robert Ghiz as premier and Wes Sheridan as finance minister, grasping at any way to raise revenues, as opposed to looking at some of the profligate ways they were spending money.

Newfoundland and Labrador have a plastic bag ban that started October 1st, 2020.
Saltwire story link


Opera sound and fury:

Saturday Afternoon at the Opera with Ben Heppner, 1PM, Radio 104.7 CBC
"Best Opera Ever" series resumes:

Semyon Bychkov, conductor,  presents Lohengrin by Richard Wagner
for a 2009 recording with him conducting featuring Johan Botha as Lohengrin and Adrianne Pieczonka as Elsa

Metropolitan Opera video streaming:

Mozart’s Don Giovanni, until 6:30PM Saturday
Starring Marina Rebeka, Barbara Frittoli, Mojca Erdmann, Ramón Vargas, Mariusz Kwiecień, Luca Pisaroni, and Štefan Kocán, conducted by Fabio Luisi -- who also plays the harpsichord!. From October 29, 2011.  About 3 hours.

Saturday, October 3
Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, Saturday 7:30PM until 6:30PM Sunday
Starring Renée Fleming, Cecilia Bartoli, Susanne Mentzer, Dwayne Croft, and Bryn Terfel. From November 11, 1998.  **Classic production!!**  About 3 hours.


Global Chorus essay for October 3
Ryan Vandecasteyen


I have hope that there is indeed a way past our current global crises. We’ve reached a critical point in our collective history; all around the world we’re seeing the impacts of our continual need for growth. Governments are favouring big business over the welfare of people and the sustainability of our life systems. Climate change is causing sea levels to rise, increased severity of major weather events and desertifcation.

Resource use is poisoning our land, air and water. We’ve entered the only era in the history of our planet where humans are a leading driver of geophysical and ecological change.

Despite how bleak the picture can be at times, I’m empowered by the thought that we’ve reached a critical turning point, and before us lies an amazing opportunity. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Every day I’m inspired and given hope by stories of groups of people all around the world standing up and demanding to be heard, telling us that business as usual is unacceptable, and taking affirmative action to affect real change.

I found myself being a part of one of these kinds of stories of standing up for change, as two colleagues and I set out to kayak the length of the British Columbian coastline to connect and engage citizens with the risks posed by the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline.

I’m lucky to live in a place where these kinds of stories are unfolding in my own backyard, where thousands of people from all walks of life are standing up to say no to dirty energy, to protect the places they call home and one of the last truly wild places on Earth.

Change is messy, and it’s not an easy task. For us to survive, we each have to recognize that we all play a role; history is being made right here and now and every one of us is already a part of it. To me the question is, will we be known for our inaction, or for our drive to recognize and act on the world-changing issues with which we’re faced?

    — Ryan Vandecasteyen, filmmaker, environmental advocate, co-creator of The Pipedreams Project

IMDB for The Pipedreams Project

--------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 2, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

Events:

Fridays for Future Charlottetown, 4PM, outside Province House.

Facebook event link

"All are welcome! We gather to express our love for humanity and our concern for the future. Feel free to bring your own signs and invite others."


Article:
https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/pei-water-coalition-urges-province-to-maintain-moratorium-proclaim-water-act-504679/

P.E.I. water coalition urges province to maintain moratorium, proclaim Water Act - The Guardian article by Stu Neatby

Published on Friday, October 2nd, 2020

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. — 

A conservation coalition is urging the province to maintain a moratorium on high-capacity irrigation wells and has raised concerns about a proposed UPEI study on their impacts.

During a meeting of the standing committee on natural resources and environmental sustainability on Thursday, members of the Coalition for the Protection of P.E.I. Water said they were disappointed to see ongoing calls for the lifting of the moratorium by industry groups.

Coalition member Don Mazer explained the group was formed in 2013 in response to calls from agricultural groups to lift the moratorium. The coalition played a significant role in the Water Act public consultations.

The province’s Water Act was passed by the legislature in 2017 but has yet to be proclaimed. The drafted regulations would maintain the moratorium on high-capacity wells, which has been in place since 2002.

"The Water Act and the draft regulations are clear about keeping the moratorium in place. And yet here we are to talk about undoing the spirit of this act before it is even enacted," Mazer told the committee.

Mazer said the P.E.I. government has put in place strong legislation to protect water in the past including banning bottled water and prohibiting fracking.

“But the high-capacity wells issue keeps coming back,” Mazer said.

“It is difficult not to feel an erosion of trust in government to protect our water in response to powerful interests like industrial agriculture."

Mazer said recent fish kills, as well as the granting of a pumping permit in the Dunk River, have contributed to this distrust.

Coalition member Gary Schneider said that if the moratorium on high-capacity wells were lifted, it would be difficult to control extraction of ground water.

"Once we start drilling high-capacity wells for agriculture, it will be impossible to turn down future requests," Schneider said.

The P.E.I. Federation of Agriculture has intensified calls for lifting the moratorium in recent months due to the summer’s dry growing conditions. The federation has pointed to statistics released by staff with the Department of Environment, Water and Climate Change that show that agricultural producers use only 0.04 per cent of the annual recharge of groundwater each year.

On Sept. 17, UPEI researcher Michael van den Heuvel provided details to the same committee about a proposed four-year study of the effects of wells on streams.

The study would involve the construction of four high-capacity wells. This would require a legislated exemption from the Water Act regulations. The research is supported by Cavendish Farms and the P.E.I. Federation of Agriculture.

On Thursday members of the coalition questioned whether this study would provide clarity.

“All science is grounded in particular interests. The proposed UPEI project is an outgrowth of the 2018 version sponsored by Cavendish Farms,” Mazer said.

“We are unlikely to learn what we need to learn about protecting our water from this study. How likely is it that the findings would recommend keeping the moratorium in place?"

Finance Minister Darlene Compton said there have been discussions within cabinet about provincial ownership of wells constructed for Van den Heuvel’s research.

Compton asked if this would inspire more confidence in van den Heuvel’s research from the coalition.

Schneider admitted he would “have more appetite” for provincial ownership of wells, but said his dominant concern remains the long-term implications of bypassing the moratorium.

“I tell you I've talked to hydro-geologists who said recharge rates are incredibly difficult to figure out. When I talked to people in the province, they say 'we've got tons of water,'" Schneider said.

"We may not have tons of water."

-30-

The informative Coalition for the Protection of PEI Water website:
https://peiwater.com/category/high-capacity-wells/

The written presentations will be on the website in the next few days.

Watch yesterday's meeting:
P.E.I. Legislature Facebook page (scroll down a bit to get to the posting)
https://www.facebook.com/peileg

Legislative Assembly of P.E.I. Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability video archives:
https://www.assembly.pe.ca/committee-archive


A bit of opera
Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, today until 8:30PM
Starring Golda Schultz, Kathryn Lewek, Charles Castronovo, Markus Werba, Christian Van Horn, and René Pape.  From October 14, 2017.

Mozart’s Don Giovanni, tonight 7:30PM until Saturday afternoon
Starring Marina Rebeka, Barbara Frittoli, Mojca Erdmann, Ramón Vargas, Mariusz Kwiecień, Luca Pisaroni, and Štefan Kocán, conducted by Fabio Luisi. From October 29, 2011.

clicking on the title will bring you to the Met Opera's page for that performance, with more information on the production and the link to the performance


Global Chorus essay for October 2
Jennifer J. Brown


When I think about our future as a species, I always look back at our history for perspective. The stone age must have seemed like all there was for a while, and then the bronze age too. And at times, the fossil fuel age we are in feels so entrenched that it is something we cannot change, but of course, it will pass, as all other ages have. Our future will shine with the realization of the promises of solar and wind generated energy; that future is blossoming even now. Alternatives to coal, oil and gas are all around us above ground and will sustain our needs with clean renewable energy. Our future is as bright as the sun.

Looking into our future as a species I see a time when life is respected universally, with the rights of people and animals protected around the world. People will continue to turn away from the barbaric practices of the past, embracing the path of vegetarian and vegan diets for a healthier planet. As the demand for animal products fade, the animals, birds and fish will regain a place of honour in the world of Homo sapiens. Their rights will be respected as ours are. We will survive to see a peaceful and natural world, rich in variety.

I have hope, and we have hope, because of the growing awareness among young people who can reach beyond borders as they learn about their world. The Internet and social media continue to connect us to each other in ways that defy nationalism and push us toward a more peaceful planet.

      —Jennifer J. Brown, PhD, author, mother, scientist

---------------------------------------------

essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

October 1, 2020

Chris Ortenburger's CANews

This morning, Thursday, October 1st:
Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability meeting, 10AM, livestreamed on-line and available after the meeting, on The Water Act regulations on water extraction.

Representatives of the Coalition for the Protection of PEI Water will be presenting to the Standing Committee on Natural Resources and Environmental Sustainability Thursday, October 1st, 2020, at 10AM.

This is in relation to the draft regulations for the Water Act, the cluster concerned with extraction of water, including high capacity wells for irrigation.

The Legislative Standing Committee information is here:

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/committees/current-committees/natural-resources-and-environmental-sustainability

and presenting will be Catherine O'Brien, chair (everyone from various backgrounds including: Citizens' Alliance), Andrew Lush (Don't Frack PEI,watershed group), Don Mazer (former UPEI professor, ECOPEI), Ann Wheatley (Cooper Institute) and Gary Schneider (ECOPEI), so you can assume there will be informative and engaging presentations, related to who the Coalition is, what's in the Water Act, public process, the current issue of high capacity wells for agriculture, and how the draft set of regulations could be improved. 

One of the purposes of this meeting and ones in the last few weeks are for the current committee members to understand where the draft regulations are, and be ready for any additional drafts.  They also write a report to the Legislature for the Fall Sitting, which should start in November after Remembrance Day.

You can watch LIVE by going to the front page of the PEI Legislative Assembly website OR Facebook page:

https://www.assembly.pe.ca/

Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/peileg/

The video will be available afterward, and transcripts so after that.


Food Events:

Starting today:
U-Pick Apples at The Mount, 9AM-6PM, 141 Mt. Edward Road, Charlottetown.  Bring your own bags/boxes/buckets, accessible but no washrooms

Monday - Friday 9AM  – 6PM, Saturday - Sunday 9AM - 4PM

"...open in October until the apples are gone.

varieties: Ambrosia, Honeycrisp, and Gala. Possible pears. These apples were grown according to organic standards in the first year of a three-year transition to organic certification.
$2 / pound, Cash or Square (interac / Visa / Mastercard) accepted

Check in at the white trailer located in the parking lot prior to picking.

Covid-19 public health protocols will be followed.

A portion of the proceeds will go toward The Mount Foundation, which supports activities for the residents of The Mount Continuing Care Community and students of The Mount Academy.

More info: (902) 370-8888

Facebook event details

Farm Centre Legacy Garden produce sale, 3-6PM, 420 University Avenue.
For sale:
-Garlic ($20 for 1 pound, $40 for 2 pounds, $50 for 3 pounds)
-Tomatoes: Roma and Mountain Merit ($1.50 per pound)
-Tomato Seconds ($1.00 per pound)
-Green Tomatoes ($1.00 per pound)
-Tomatillos ($2.50 per pound)
-Winter squash: butternut, acorn, kabocha... ($2.00 per pound)
-Fresh herbs: Parsley, sage, dill ($2.00 per bunch)
-Dried herbs: Basil, parsley, sage ($3.00 per 20g)
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timely
​​​​​​​https://www.theguardian.pe.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/guest-opinion-way-past-time-to-settle-water-issue-503389/

GUEST OPINION: Way past time to settle water issue - The Guardian Guest Opinion by Gary Walker

Published on Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

 I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but what the heck is going on here? A moratorium on drilling high-capacity wells in the province has been in place since 2002. Back in 2014, the Council of Canadians said, "There is a huge danger in allowing deep well irrigation in the province." Our ground water is not an infinite resource and we will suffer from long-term ground water depletion.

"Eventually our water table will respond, causing serious environmental damage and affecting individual and municipal water supplies."

This year, on April 3, 2020, Cavendish Farms advised their P.E.I. potato producers to "sell to other markets if they can," as the company was dealing with a sharp drop in demand for its product, in the wake of COVID-19-related restaurant closures. On April 2, Agriculture Minister Bloyce Thompson announced funding of $4.7 million dollars to Cavendish Farms, saying the money would pay for shipping from the 2019 growing season "to help mitigate the potato surplus". 

Also, a spokesperson for the department told CBC that "as part of the arrangement, Cavendish Farms had agreed to process the 40 million kilograms of potatoes that didn't have a market. The P.E.I. government says this money will result in 40 million kilograms of Island potatoes being processed, rather than potentially going into landfill."

In June of 2020, after COVID-19 hit, the Coalition for the Protection of P.E.I. Water at https://peiwater.com was calling for a moratorium on holding ponds, however, Cavendish Farms was, and continues to call for deep-wells.

So, as nearly I can tell, after an eternity without rain on P.E.I., Cavendish Farms — supported by Mr. King's government is 1) doing us a favour by taking our "surplus" potatoes, and, 2) supported by other groups, still wants deep-water wells.

Hold it right there. It is way past time to re-think the water issue here on P.E.I. It is said that one definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Soon, unless a miracle occurs, without lots of rain, we won't have to worry about deep-water wells; there won't be any water left in the ground. Which begs the question: Since we can't sell last year's crop of potatoes, why are we planting more? The Souris P.E.I. Export Processing Organic Plant told this writer that it can't keep up with demand for its potato products. So do we need more, or less? Or a new company or government to call the shots?

We are in a new reality. It's way past time that we seriously looked at other crops here in P.E.I. Please. As far as water goes, potatoes and golf clubs have done a great job of poisoning our steams and wasting the little water we have left. And what's with the obsession with huge lawns, acres and acres of them in the country? These aren't good for water; plus, cutting these lawns causes a huge amount of air (and noise) pollution — great for global warming.

Now — the icing on the cake — a professor at UPEI is proposing a four-year study on deep-water wells. Four years! This study would involve installing four new high-capacity irrigation wells to measure the impact their use has on the local watershed. And people with ties on are nodding their heads and thinking this is a good idea. Really, is there a crystal ball involved here? What will the Island be like in four years? How about four weeks? Four days?

Two major things are needed for immediate survival — air and water. Things have changed, and rapidly. Ask the people in Vancouver about clean air. As for water — we can't afford to waste any. What if we have to stay indoors, and have little snow and no rain next summer? Last year you would have laughed at such ideas. This year, thanks to COVID-19 and weather patterns, both of which we have no control over, all bets are off.

The main thing that we need now, and will in the future, is water. Good, clean water, for our own survival on our Island home. Let's conserve what we have left.

Gary Walker is a former educator who lives in Charlottetown.


opera for all ages

Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito, until 6:30PM tonight
"Starring Lucy Crowe, Barbara Frittoli, Elīna Garanča, Kate Lindsey, Giuseppe Filianoti, and Oren Gradus, conducted by Harry Bicket. From December 1, 2012."  If you read through the synopsis about four times, it finally isn't so confusing.  The music is familiar and that's a comfort.  And gorgeous.

Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte, tonight 7:30PM until Friday about 6:30PM
"Starring Golda Schultz, Kathryn Lewek, Charles Castronovo, Markus Werba, Christian Van Horn, and René Pape.  From October 14, 2017."  Three hours on the dot of "magic"!


Global Chorus essay for October 1
Rob Sisson


ConservAmerica is an American conservation group of Republicans and conservatives who care about environmental protection. For the past two decades, there has not been a lot of reason to be optimistic that we’ll leave behind a sustainable world for future generations.

Today, however, I am extremely optimistic and hopeful for our shared future. We have a moral obligation to lead on major global issues like climate change, clean drinking water and clean air. Ronald Reagan referred to America as “the shining light upon a hill” giving hope to all the world’s citizens. A purposeful failure to answer the present environmental challenges would extinguish that beacon.

My political party is the keystone – currently the missing piece in building the national will to tackle these problems. I’m confdent that the Republican Party will soon rediscover its great conservation legacy. The demographic landscape in America will force the party to adapt. Voters under the age of thirty believe environmental protection should be a priority. Hispanic voters, the fastest growing cohort, strongly support climate action. Pro-life voters, always taken for granted by Republican candidates, are now recognizing that sustaining life after birth is equally important to protecting it before birth. Recent polls even demonstrate rank-and-file Republicans support laws protecting the environment.

It is among faith-based voters, the salt of the conservative movement, where I have greatest hope. There are 70 million Catholics in the United States, and I am one of them. The last two popes – John Paul II and Benedict XVI – spoke eloquently and often about caring for creation. Pope Francis has surpassed his predecessors in the ability to reach into the hearts of Catholics around the world. His focus on environmental protection and justice is awakening the slumbering Church. If – when – he issues a call to U.S. Catholics to rise above politics and self-interest to serve God and humanity, American politicians will race to the front of the legion.

In 1984, Ronald Reagan described our mutual obligation:

We want to protect and conserve the land on which we live – our countryside, our rivers and mountains, our plains and meadows and forests. This is our patrimony. This is what we leave to our children. And our great moral responsibility is to leave it to them either as we found it or better than we found it.

Thirty years later, I am brimming with hope that we will heed those words.

       — Rob Sisson, president of ConservAmerica

https://www.conservamerica.org/
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essay from:
Global Chorus: 365 Voices on the Future of the Planet
edited by Todd E. MacLean
copyright 2014
http://globalchorus.ca

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